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What is a Law Foundation Year?

A Law Foundation Year is a one year course that equips students with the essential academic skills and foundational legal knowledge to prepare them for the first year of a Law Degree. It is designed for students who do not meet the standard entry requirements for the degree.

The LLB with Foundation year is an integrated foundation course. If you aspire to have a career in law, the foundation year is designed to provide a strong grounding in both subject knowledge and skills.

If you pass the foundation year, you automatically progress to the Northumbria LLB undergraduate honours degree.

In the Foundation Year you study five semester long modules and one-year long module where you will develop your knowledge of the theory and practice of law. You will also have an opportunity to learn effective academic writing, analysis skills, interpersonal communication, and the ability to work in teams. The main attribute you need to bring is curiosity.

Our modules encourage you to look at contemporary legal issues and events, exploring how the law works. During your modules, you will consider ethical issues and learn analytical skills while being encouraged to build your creative, critical, and independent thinking.

On successful completion of the Foundation Year, you will progress to the LLB (Hons) programme, which is designed to provide you with a thorough grounding in legal principles. The degree programme includes study of the 7 foundations of legal knowledge which are required for a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD), the first stage of legal education for those who might want to pursue a career as a barrister. The LLB degree course will provide you with the relevant skills and knowledge to sit the Solicitors Qualifying Examination. The foundations of legal knowledge are Constitutional and Administrative Law, Law of Contract, Crime, Equity and Trusts, EU, Land, and Tort. On the LLB you can choose from a wide range of options (including working in the Student Law Office).

Successful completion of the foundation year qualifies you to join:

If you already know you want to study Law then check out all of our available Law Courses to find the right one for you.

Why choose Northumbria to Study a Law Foundation Year?

  • Over 92% of students studying Law at Northumbria believed that their course enabled them to develop knowledge and skills needed for their future (NSS, 2024).

  • Law at Northumbria is ranked 7th in the UK for research power out of 69 submissions (REF, 2021). This represents a rise of 37 places compared to 2014.

  • Law at Northumbria is ranked Top 40 in the UK by the Complete University Guide for 2024.

If I wish to qualify as a solicitor, what will I have to do if I start a Qualifying Law Degree after September 2021?

The Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE) is an assessment method that all aspiring solicitors are required to pass in England and Wales. This route has been in action since November 2021.

Previously, qualifying as a solicitor required the completion of a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD), such as LLB or GLD, as well as completion of a Legal Practice Course (LPC) and two years of recognised training (known as a Training Contract). During the training contract, students undertook a final assessment as part of the Professional Skills Course (PSC).

The introduction of SQE means this process is more centralised, split into 4 stages. Now, the new qualification route requires:

• You must still hold a degree or equivalent in any subject

• You must have a minimum of two years’ ‘Qualifying Work Experience’ (QWE)

• You must pass the new SQE assessments

• You must be able to show that you are of satisfactory character and suitability

The SQE Assessment is further split into 2 components:

SQE Stage 1 – A test of your ‘functioning legal knowledge’ and application of law based on realistic client scenarios. This stage consists of 2 multiple choice papers of 180 questions each. To progress onto Stage 2, you must pass Stage 1.

SQE Stage 2 – A test of your practical legal skills including interviewing (notes and analysis), advocacy, research, drafting, writing, and case analysis.

As mentioned above, ‘Qualifying Work Experience’ (QWE) is also required as part of the SQE route. The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) do anticipate that student’s gain this experience before sitting their Stage 2 assessment. A minimum of two years is required and, where the previous route was restricted to one organisation for the entire duration, the new QWE framework means students can gather experience in a maximum of 4 periods with up to 4 different organisations. This new development provides students with more flexibility and opportunity to widen their knowledge and prepare for practice that best suits their talents.

The total cost of this new qualification route, in addition to tuition fees, is £4,115. SQE Stage 1 is £1,622 for the two examinations, while SQE Stage 2 is £2,493 for the written and oral tasks. For any resits taking place you will pay a fee depending on your circumstances, more information can be found here.

*Please note these fees are subject to change 

What is a Law Foundation Year?

A Law Foundation Year is a one year course that equips students with the essential academic skills and foundational legal knowledge to prepare them for the first year of a Law Degree. It is designed for students who do not meet the standard entry requirements for the degree.

The LLB with Foundation year is an integrated foundation course. If you aspire to have a career in law, the foundation year is designed to provide a strong grounding in both subject knowledge and skills.

If you pass the foundation year, you automatically progress to the Northumbria LLB undergraduate honours degree.

In the Foundation Year you study five semester long modules and one-year long module where you will develop your knowledge of the theory and practice of law. You will also have an opportunity to learn effective academic writing, analysis skills, interpersonal communication, and the ability to work in teams. The main attribute you need to bring is curiosity.

Our modules encourage you to look at contemporary legal issues and events, exploring how the law works. During your modules, you will consider ethical issues and learn analytical skills while being encouraged to build your creative, critical, and independent thinking.

On successful completion of the Foundation Year, you will progress to the LLB (Hons) programme, which is designed to provide you with a thorough grounding in legal principles. The degree programme includes study of the 7 foundations of legal knowledge which are required for a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD), the first stage of legal education for those who might want to pursue a career as a barrister. The LLB degree course will provide you with the relevant skills and knowledge to sit the Solicitors Qualifying Examination. The foundations of legal knowledge are Constitutional and Administrative Law, Law of Contract, Crime, Equity and Trusts, EU, Land, and Tort. On the LLB you can choose from a wide range of options (including working in the Student Law Office).

Successful completion of the foundation year qualifies you to join:

If you already know you want to study Law then check out all of our available Law Courses to find the right one for you.

Why choose Northumbria to Study a Law Foundation Year?

  • Over 92% of students studying Law at Northumbria believed that their course enabled them to develop knowledge and skills needed for their future (NSS, 2024).

  • Law at Northumbria is ranked 7th in the UK for research power out of 69 submissions (REF, 2021). This represents a rise of 37 places compared to 2014.

  • Law at Northumbria is ranked Top 40 in the UK by the Complete University Guide for 2024.

If I wish to qualify as a solicitor, what will I have to do if I start a Qualifying Law Degree after September 2021?

The Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE) is an assessment method that all aspiring solicitors are required to pass in England and Wales. This route has been in action since November 2021.

Previously, qualifying as a solicitor required the completion of a Qualifying Law Degree (QLD), such as LLB or GLD, as well as completion of a Legal Practice Course (LPC) and two years of recognised training (known as a Training Contract). During the training contract, students undertook a final assessment as part of the Professional Skills Course (PSC).

The introduction of SQE means this process is more centralised, split into 4 stages. Now, the new qualification route requires:

• You must still hold a degree or equivalent in any subject

• You must have a minimum of two years’ ‘Qualifying Work Experience’ (QWE)

• You must pass the new SQE assessments

• You must be able to show that you are of satisfactory character and suitability

The SQE Assessment is further split into 2 components:

SQE Stage 1 – A test of your ‘functioning legal knowledge’ and application of law based on realistic client scenarios. This stage consists of 2 multiple choice papers of 180 questions each. To progress onto Stage 2, you must pass Stage 1.

SQE Stage 2 – A test of your practical legal skills including interviewing (notes and analysis), advocacy, research, drafting, writing, and case analysis.

As mentioned above, ‘Qualifying Work Experience’ (QWE) is also required as part of the SQE route. The Solicitors Regulation Authority (SRA) do anticipate that student’s gain this experience before sitting their Stage 2 assessment. A minimum of two years is required and, where the previous route was restricted to one organisation for the entire duration, the new QWE framework means students can gather experience in a maximum of 4 periods with up to 4 different organisations. This new development provides students with more flexibility and opportunity to widen their knowledge and prepare for practice that best suits their talents.

The total cost of this new qualification route, in addition to tuition fees, is £4,115. SQE Stage 1 is £1,622 for the two examinations, while SQE Stage 2 is £2,493 for the written and oral tasks. For any resits taking place you will pay a fee depending on your circumstances, more information can be found here.

*Please note these fees are subject to change 

Course Information

UCAS Code
M757

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
Foundation year followed by a further 3 or 4 years full-time study

Department
Northumbria Law School

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2024 or September 2025

Fees
Fee Information

Modules
Module Information

Learning Law / Hear from our students

Hear what it is really like to study our Law foundation year from our current students.

Our Take On Law student podcast series

Department / Northumbria Law School

Northumbria Law School is one of the largest law schools in the UK, with a national and international reputation for excellence in legal education for those interested in studying law.

Image of a gavel and law books

Department

Discover NU World / A virtual journey through everything Northumbria has to offer.

Explore our immersive 360 tours, informative subject videos, inspirational student profiles, ground-breaking research, and a range of life at university videos and articles.

Delve Deeper / Discover more about life at Northumbria

Book an Open Day / Law Foundation Year LLB (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Law LLB. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

80 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Northumbria University is committed to supporting all individuals to achieve their ambitions. We have a range of schemes and alternative offers to make sure as many individuals as possible are given an opportunity to study at our University regardless of personal circumstances or background. To find out more, review our Northumbria Entry Requirement Essential Information page for further details www.northumbria.ac.uk/entryrequirementsinfo

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications 

Entry Requirements 2025/26

Standard Entry

80 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Northumbria University is committed to supporting all individuals to achieve their ambitions. We have a range of schemes and alternative offers to make sure as many individuals as possible are given an opportunity to study at our University regardless of personal circumstances or background. To find out more, review our Northumbria Entry Requirement Essential Information page for further details www.northumbria.ac.uk/entryrequirementsinfo

Subject Requirements:

There are no specific subject requirements for this course.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications 

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1: £9,250

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.


EU Fee in Year 1: £18,250

International Fee in Year 1: £18,250


Please see the main Funding Pages for 24/25 scholarship information.

 


ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Fees and Funding 2025/26 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1*: TBC

* Government has yet to announce 25/26 tuition fee levels. As a guide, 24/25 fees were £9,250 per year. 



EU Fee in Year 1: **TBC


International Fee in Year 1: TBC

ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

How to Apply

Please use the Apply Now button at the top of this page to submit your application.

Certain applications may need to be submitted via an external application system, such as UCAS, Lawcabs or DfE Apply.

The Apply Now button will redirect you to the relevant website if this is the case.

You can find further application advice, such as what to include in your application and what happens after you apply, on our Admissions Hub Admissions | Northumbria University



Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

LW3000 -

Law and Society (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with the knowledge and understanding of the role law plays in modern society. You will examine the interrelationship between law and the other social, cultural, economic and political elements that make up the society in which we live. You will consider the profound changes that have taken place in society over the last 200 years and understand how the law has evolved to meet the changing needs and values of that society. You will consider the relationship of law to those changes and assess whether the law has been successful in keeping pace. So for example how well has the law coped with the advance of human rights and civil liberties, or how far has law gone in controlling the internet and cyber-crime or cyber bullying.

You will also be introduced to theories of what law is and what distinguishes a legal rule from other forms of rules and why that might be. For many centuries legal philosophers have asked the question such as “what is law?” and “why should we follow the law?” – you will consider some of the key concepts that lie behind these questions.

The assessment will be through a portfolio of work that will be submitted at the end of the semester, this will include personal reflections and a mark for a group presentation.

More information

LW3001 -

Law and Ethics (Core,20 Credits)

This module recognises the important role that ethics has to the practice of law and is designed to enable students to begin to develop the knowledge, thinking skills and practical aptitudes in relation to law and ethics necessary to the successful study and practice of law.

You will be encouraged to consider your own moral positions using Case studies, both real and fictional, (e.g. lifeboat cannibalism, autonomy and end of life cases) to present you legal ethical dilemmas. Using Tutor led and group discussion you will begin to investigate both the basis of your ethical views and to deconstruct moral makeup: and consider challenging questions such as where does your moral sense originate? How do you make ethical judgements and to what extent are your actions guided by these judgements? These and other questions you will face include whether your moral sensibilities are a sufficient foundation for evaluating moral problems, making judgements and acting upon them – especially in consideration of your moral responsibilities to others.

Basic moral philosophical distinctions will be made between the nature of moral judgements and argument (e.g. are there any objective moral truths) and ethical principles (e.g. what does it mean to be a ‘good person’ and why?). A range of ethical stances will be examined and account taken of the historical development of ethical thought and its relation to law in particular areas e.g. insanity, marriage, children, homosexuality, animals.

Building on these ideas, the second part of the module will explore case studies using class debates, research tasks and films selected from the Muckle law film collection sessions. Wherever possible, contemporaneous events in the media will be incorporated to make the module content current. Links will be made to Year 1 modules such as Public Law, Crime, Contract, Property and Tort to illustrate the centrality of ethics to the making and practice of law. Themes will include Criminal Justice, Human Rights and Freedom to resist the law, Equality, Medical and Scientific development (eg abortion, right to life and euthanasia )

More information

LW3003 -

Academic Practice for Law (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with the opportunity to develop academic skills, knowledge and understanding to support your future study of law. You will build an awareness of the importance of examining knowledge and beliefs critically; and to develop the ability to recognise, analyse and evaluate your own and others’ beliefs and knowledge claims in a variety of contexts. In doing so you will learn about the different types of sources and resources which are integral to higher education study. You will begin to engage in generating your own views, arguments and develop the skills, which you will need in order to express these views clearly across a range of media. This is an innovative module where you will from the start engage with challenging aspects of the legal world whilst building important academic skills and practices. In particular you will develop the following skills:

• Reading and understanding academic texts and legal source materials
• Time management
• Research skills
• Essay writing
• Discussion & presentation skills
• Examination techniques


You will be assessed through completion of an annotated bibliography. You will be given a broad legal topic in which to analyse, and you will be asked to locate a range of sources. You will need to correctly reference each source, and give your personal summary and evaluation of each source you find. Your bibliography can be a maximum of 2000 words in length. Your bibliography will be assessed by asking whether you have demonstrated sufficient academic practice skills on a pass / fail basis. You will be given a number of opportunities to practice this task, and receive feedback from tutors, before you submit your assignment. You will also receive feedback (from your peers and from your tutors) on other key academic skills, such as your academic writing, research, and giving presentations.

More information

LW3005 -

Law in Action (Core,40 Credits)

This year-long module is designed to introduce you to the real world of criminal and civil legal practice. Working within the Law School’s vibrant community of academic and legal practitioners, you will focus on two fictitious case scenarios of the kind that criminal and civil lawyers regularly encounter in practice. Working individually and in groups you will begin to identify the legal problems arising in the scenarios and start to generate and present solutions to the problems your clients face. In doing so, you will develop key legal skills of oral and written communication, fact management, case analysis and legal research – skills that are central to the work of the practising lawyer. You will also begin to develop your knowledge of crime and tort law as you begin to resolve the legal issues in your client’s case.
The knowledge and skills you develop in this module will be invaluable to you in your later studies in law, as well as in your future legal careers. You will become more confident when identifying solutions to legal problems and when communicating with the public and your peers. You will also begin to appreciate the challenges and opportunities faced by the legal services sector in England and Wales and the broader context within which the law operates.
Lectures will introduce you to the area of criminal and civil practice, will highlight the role of key professionals and will inform and provide a context for the work you carry out in tutor supervised workshops, and tutor guided workshops (Hub sessions). Lectures, workshops and Hub sessions will help you to deepen knowledge and understanding, giving you an oportunity to practice and develop your analysis and problem-solving skills as you learn how criminal and civil law is applied to resolve legal problems in the real world.

You will benefit from technology-enhanced learning, including webcasts and feedback opportunities to build your skills, knowledge and understanding, equipping you for the module assessments and beyond.
No prior knowledge of law is required to study this module which complements the other modules offered on your Foundation programme, as well as the Approaches to Law and Lawyering Skills module offered in year 1 on the MLaw Degree at Northumbria.

More information

LW3006 -

Project: Lives, Trials and the Law (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to build on your understanding of wider legal issues, gained in previous modules and to provide an opportunity to further enhance your skills and Academic practices. You will use this module to identify and explore key cases and events in the Law which will illuminate the law in its social, historical, and ethical guises. The module will develop the skills which lawyers are expected to demonstrate, such as being able identify, select and evaluate diverse sources of legal information, critically examine and appraise a specific area of Law. Further, in producing a coherent, independent research project you will also demonstrate the ability to apply skills of research, analysis and synthesis and to communicate your findings efficiently and effectively both orally and in writing.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

LW3000 -

Law and Society (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with the knowledge and understanding of the role law plays in modern society. You will examine the interrelationship between law and the other social, cultural, economic and political elements that make up the society in which we live. You will consider the profound changes that have taken place in society over the last 200 years and understand how the law has evolved to meet the changing needs and values of that society. You will consider the relationship of law to those changes and assess whether the law has been successful in keeping pace. So for example how well has the law coped with the advance of human rights and civil liberties, or how far has law gone in controlling the internet and cyber-crime or cyber bullying.

You will also be introduced to theories of what law is and what distinguishes a legal rule from other forms of rules and why that might be. For many centuries legal philosophers have asked the question such as “what is law?” and “why should we follow the law?” – you will consider some of the key concepts that lie behind these questions.

The assessment will be through a portfolio of work that will be submitted at the end of the semester, this will include personal reflections and a mark for a group presentation.

More information

LW3001 -

Law and Ethics (Core,20 Credits)

This module recognises the important role that ethics has to the practice of law and is designed to enable students to begin to develop the knowledge, thinking skills and practical aptitudes in relation to law and ethics necessary to the successful study and practice of law.

You will be encouraged to consider your own moral positions using Case studies, both real and fictional, (e.g. lifeboat cannibalism, autonomy and end of life cases) to present you legal ethical dilemmas. Using Tutor led and group discussion you will begin to investigate both the basis of your ethical views and to deconstruct moral makeup: and consider challenging questions such as where does your moral sense originate? How do you make ethical judgements and to what extent are your actions guided by these judgements? These and other questions you will face include whether your moral sensibilities are a sufficient foundation for evaluating moral problems, making judgements and acting upon them – especially in consideration of your moral responsibilities to others.

Basic moral philosophical distinctions will be made between the nature of moral judgements and argument (e.g. are there any objective moral truths) and ethical principles (e.g. what does it mean to be a ‘good person’ and why?). A range of ethical stances will be examined and account taken of the historical development of ethical thought and its relation to law in particular areas e.g. insanity, marriage, children, homosexuality, animals.

Building on these ideas, the second part of the module will explore case studies using class debates, research tasks and films selected from the Muckle law film collection sessions. Wherever possible, contemporaneous events in the media will be incorporated to make the module content current. Links will be made to Year 1 modules such as Public Law, Crime, Contract, Property and Tort to illustrate the centrality of ethics to the making and practice of law. Themes will include Criminal Justice, Human Rights and Freedom to resist the law, Equality, Medical and Scientific development (eg abortion, right to life and euthanasia )

More information

LW3003 -

Academic Practice for Law (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with the opportunity to develop academic skills, knowledge and understanding to support your future study of law. You will build an awareness of the importance of examining knowledge and beliefs critically; and to develop the ability to recognise, analyse and evaluate your own and others’ beliefs and knowledge claims in a variety of contexts. In doing so you will learn about the different types of sources and resources which are integral to higher education study. You will begin to engage in generating your own views, arguments and develop the skills, which you will need in order to express these views clearly across a range of media. This is an innovative module where you will from the start engage with challenging aspects of the legal world whilst building important academic skills and practices. In particular you will develop the following skills:

• Reading and understanding academic texts and legal source materials
• Time management
• Research skills
• Essay writing
• Discussion & presentation skills
• Examination techniques


You will be assessed through completion of an annotated bibliography. You will be given a broad legal topic in which to analyse, and you will be asked to locate a range of sources. You will need to correctly reference each source, and give your personal summary and evaluation of each source you find. Your bibliography can be a maximum of 2000 words in length. Your bibliography will be assessed by asking whether you have demonstrated sufficient academic practice skills on a pass / fail basis. You will be given a number of opportunities to practice this task, and receive feedback from tutors, before you submit your assignment. You will also receive feedback (from your peers and from your tutors) on other key academic skills, such as your academic writing, research, and giving presentations.

More information

LW3005 -

Law in Action (Core,40 Credits)

This year-long module is designed to introduce you to the real world of criminal and civil legal practice. Working within the Law School’s vibrant community of academic and legal practitioners, you will focus on two fictitious case scenarios of the kind that criminal and civil lawyers regularly encounter in practice. Working individually and in groups you will begin to identify the legal problems arising in the scenarios and start to generate and present solutions to the problems your clients face. In doing so, you will develop key legal skills of oral and written communication, fact management, case analysis and legal research – skills that are central to the work of the practising lawyer. You will also begin to develop your knowledge of crime and tort law as you begin to resolve the legal issues in your client’s case.
The knowledge and skills you develop in this module will be invaluable to you in your later studies in law, as well as in your future legal careers. You will become more confident when identifying solutions to legal problems and when communicating with the public and your peers. You will also begin to appreciate the challenges and opportunities faced by the legal services sector in England and Wales and the broader context within which the law operates.
Lectures will introduce you to the area of criminal and civil practice, will highlight the role of key professionals and will inform and provide a context for the work you carry out in tutor supervised workshops, and tutor guided workshops (Hub sessions). Lectures, workshops and Hub sessions will help you to deepen knowledge and understanding, giving you an oportunity to practice and develop your analysis and problem-solving skills as you learn how criminal and civil law is applied to resolve legal problems in the real world.

You will benefit from technology-enhanced learning, including webcasts and feedback opportunities to build your skills, knowledge and understanding, equipping you for the module assessments and beyond.
No prior knowledge of law is required to study this module which complements the other modules offered on your Foundation programme, as well as the Approaches to Law and Lawyering Skills module offered in year 1 on the MLaw Degree at Northumbria.

More information

LW3006 -

Project: Lives, Trials and the Law (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to build on your understanding of wider legal issues, gained in previous modules and to provide an opportunity to further enhance your skills and Academic practices. You will use this module to identify and explore key cases and events in the Law which will illuminate the law in its social, historical, and ethical guises. The module will develop the skills which lawyers are expected to demonstrate, such as being able identify, select and evaluate diverse sources of legal information, critically examine and appraise a specific area of Law. Further, in producing a coherent, independent research project you will also demonstrate the ability to apply skills of research, analysis and synthesis and to communicate your findings efficiently and effectively both orally and in writing.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Law Foundation Year

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

START MONTH
YEAR

UniStats

Any Questions?

Our Applicant Services team will be happy to help.  They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901 or by using our Contact Form.



Accessibility and Student Inclusion

Northumbria University is committed to developing an inclusive, diverse and accessible campus and wider University community and are determined to ensure that opportunities we provide are open to all.

We are proud to work in partnership with AccessAble to provide Detailed Access Guides to our buildings and facilities across our City, Coach Lane and London Campuses. A Detailed Access Guide lets you know what access will be like when you visit somewhere. It looks at the route you will use getting in and what is available inside. All guides have Accessibility Symbols that give you a quick overview of what is available, and photographs to show you what to expect. The guides are produced by trained surveyors who visit our campuses annually to ensure you have trusted and accurate information.

You can use Northumbria’s AccessAble Guides anytime to check the accessibility of a building or facility and to plan your routes and journeys. Search by location, building or accessibility feature to find the information you need. 

We are dedicated to helping students who may require additional support during their student journey and offer 1-1 advice and guidance appropriate to individual requirements. If you feel you may need additional support you can find out more about what we offer here where you can also contact us with any questions you may have:

Accessibility support

Student Inclusion support




All information is accurate at the time of sharing. 

Full time Courses are primarily delivered via on-campus face to face learning but could include elements of online learning. Most courses run as planned and as promoted on our website and via our marketing materials, but if there are any substantial changes (as determined by the Competition and Markets Authority) to a course or there is the potential that course may be withdrawn, we will notify all affected applicants as soon as possible with advice and guidance regarding their options. It is also important to be aware that optional modules listed on course pages may be subject to change depending on uptake numbers each year.  

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with possible restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors if this is deemed necessary in future.

 

Useful Links

Find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions
northumbria.ac.uk/terms

Fees and Funding
northumbria.ac.uk/fees

Admissions Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy

Admissions Complaints Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/complaints



If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

a sign in front of a crowd
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Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

a person sitting at a table using a laptop
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NU World Virtual Tours
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Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

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