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90% of our research outputs are internationally excellent

Would you like to learn the hands-on technical, analytical and practical skills required to prepare you for a career as an electrical and electronic engineer, with the option of progressing to full Chartered Engineer status?

An electrical and electronic engineer has the ability and knowledge to use principles of science and mathematics to create new products that enhance and improve quality of life across the world. This integrated master’s course will give you an extra edge in today’s competitive job market.

The MEng Electrical and Electronic Engineering course will allow you to explore this subject in greater depth, with a specialised final year that leads to a master of engineering qualification.

Thanks to the recovering economy and advancements in technology, graduates are in high demand globally meaning there has never been a better time to enter the industry.

Although our current programme, based on AHEP3 learning outcomes, is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET), the MEng Electrical and Electronic Engineering course is undergoing changes to transition for compliance to AHEP4 and to ensure provision to you with all of the skills and knowledge required to pursue a career in this exciting and diverse industry. This new programme will allow you to have more flexibility in selecting your career path and will be reviewed by the IET in 2024, with the expectation for being approved for accreditation from 2023/24 academic year.

See other similar courses you may be interested in: BEng (Hons) Electrical and Electronic Engineering.

Why choose Northumbria to Study Electrical and Electronic Engineering?

Top Department - Electrical & Electronic Engineering at Northumbria is ranked Top 40 in the UK by the Complete University Guide for 2024.

Super Satisfaction - Over 92% of students studying Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Northumbria believed that subject specific resources were easy to access and that staff supported their learning (NSS, 2023). Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Northumbria is ranked top 15 in the UK for overall Student Experience (Times Good University Guide, 2024).

Internationally Recognised Research - 90% of our research outputs are rated as internationally excellent (3*) and world-leading (4*) (REF, 2021). Engineering is ranked 25th for research power in the UK out of 89 submissions (REF, 2021). This is a rise of 8 places compared to 2014.

Accredited Degree - Accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) on behalf of the Engineering Council for the purposes of fully meeting the academic requirement for registration as an Incorporated Engineer and partly meeting the academic requirement for registration as a Chartered Engineer.

 

 

 

 Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) logo 

Course Information

UCAS Code
H605

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
4 years full-time or 5 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2024 or September 2025

Fee Information

Module Information

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Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Electrical and Electronic Engineering. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

112 UCAS Tariff points

From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A-level, T Level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas, or the International Baccalaureate.

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth by using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Northumbria University is committed to supporting all individuals to achieve their ambitions. We have a range of schemes and alternative offers to make sure as many individuals as possible are given an opportunity to study at our University regardless of personal circumstances or background. To find out more, review our Northumbria Entry Requirement Essential Information page for further details www.northumbria.ac.uk/entryrequirementsinfo

Subject Requirements:

A-level Mathematics and another analytical science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Computer Sciences, Physics or Technology), or recognised equivalents.

GCSE Requirements:

Applicants will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4/C, or an equivalent.

Additional Requirements:

There are no additional requirements for this course.

International Qualifications:

We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications which may not match those shown above.

If you have qualifications from outside the UK, find out what you need by visiting www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:

International applicants should have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 5.5 with 5.5 in each component (or an approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades in our English Language section: www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

UK Fee in Year 1: £9,250

* The maximum tuition fee that we are permitted to charge for UK students is set by government. Tuition fees may increase in each subsequent academic year of your course, these are subject to government regulations and in line with inflation.


EU Fee in Year 1: £19,750

International Fee in Year 1: £19,750


Please see the main Funding Pages for 24/25 scholarship information.

 


ADDITIONAL COSTS

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KC4010 -

Engineering Mathematics (Core,20 Credits)

This course will introduce and delve into the following maths concepts

Basic algebra and trigonometry
This course develops the foundational mathematics skills and language set that underpin analytical sciences. This will include the transposition and manipulation of algebraic expressions, the notion of functions and the basics of trigonometry

Basic calculus
We will define the derivative, how one quantity can change with respect to another, and learn how to compute these. We will also encounter the integral, related to areas and averages, and tackle computations involving these

Complex numbers
This course introduces complex numbers, important in electrical engineering and beyond, and teaches students about their property, their algebra and how these numbers can be understood geometrically.

Further Calculus
Further into the course, we will build upon our understanding of calculus with more advanced methods, introducing partial differentiation for functions of multiple variables, as well as more advanced integral techniques to simplify complex problems.

Matrices and Vectors
A fundamental aspect of modern computing, we will define what vectors and matrices are and how one can undertake computations involving these and their special properties. We will demonstrate how large systems of equations can be formulated as matrix-vector problems, making them far easier to solve.


Differential Equations
A cornerstone of modern physics, we will learn how to identify and solve differential equations by several techniques. We will also encounter the wave equation, which underpins a great number of applications, and learn methods as to how it can be solved and understood.

More information

KD4008 -

Computer Programming (Core,20 Credits)

Within this module you will cover the design and development of C based code for both a standard PC and an embedded system.

The module syllabus us based but not exclusively on the following:
• Introduction of computer systems, the architecture and types from standard PCs to embedded systems,
• Code development from specifications through Pseudo code to a top-down or bottom-up based design,
• Language operators for example, if-then-else, switch-case, do-while, for,
• Data types for systems including bit length, and data pointer structures and use,
• Use of information hiding in functions, with strongly typed designs,
• File system access for a PC and for an embedded system where files may be more abstract handles,
• Controlling hardware on an embedded system for example and ADC or DAC on a microcontroller,
• The use of IO lines and interrupt structures in low level programming.

Typically the learning in the module will be based on simple case studies and example such that the above knowledge can be applied to solve a real world problem within a defined engineering context. An example of such a real-world problem would be a Traffic Light controller, or Home Burglar Alarm system.

More information

KD4009 -

Digital Electronics and Communications (Core,20 Credits)

The students will gain fundamental knowledge as follows:

Within the digital electronics aspect of this module the student will learn

The operation of logic gates AND,NAND,OR,NOR,XOR.
The use of truth tables and logic gates to solve combinational logic problems.
Boolean algebra and the use of Boolean algebra to simplify logic expressions prior to implementation.
The use of Karnaugh maps to simplify logic expressions prior to implementation.
Implementation of adders/subtractors using logic gates.
Using logic gates to implement S-R flip flop, J-K flip flop and D-type flip flop.
Using flip flops to develop asynchronous counters and shift registers.

Within the communication aspects of this module the student will learn

Typical types of communication techniques
Characteristics of analogue signals, their time- and frequency-domain representations
Importance of bandwidth
Characteristics of digital signals, frequency domain representation of digital signals
Evaluation of basic transmission performance in communications
Signal conversion techniques on communications
Analog and digital modulation
Encoding
Multiplexing

In addition to the gained knowledge, the students will apply this knowledge to analyse and design digital electronics circuits and communication systems. The design of analysis aspects will be targeted especially in the laboratory sessions.

More information

KD4010 -

Electricity, Magnetism and Electronics (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to fundamental electromagnetism, electrical circuit theory and analogue electronics. Through a combination of lectures, labs and technology-enhanced resources, you will learn to analyse basic DC and AC circuits and to familiarise with fundamental electronic components such as operational amplifiers and semiconductor diodes. This module will provide you with core knowledge, and experimental, numerical and analytical skills to tackle problems in electrical and electronic principles, thus establishing firm foundations for future employability.

Electricity and Magnetism (25%)

Electrostatics: Coulomb's law of electrostatic forces, superposition of electrostatic forces and the electric field, electric flux, Gauss’s law and its applications to calculate electric field associated with the continuous charge distributions; Concept of electric potential and its relation to the electric field; Energy stored in an electric field; Introduction to magnetostatics.

DC and AC Circuit Theory (50%)

Introduction to ideal linear elements: resistor, inductor and capacitor. Transient currents across ideal elements. Current and voltage division rule. Applications of superposition: Kirchhoff’s law.


Properties of sinusoidal and periodic waveforms, average, RMS values. Phasors and phasor diagrams, and j operator. Complex impedance, impedance diagrams.

Applications to series circuits. Power in AC circuits, power factor, apparent power, active power, and reactive power. Complex admittance and applications to parallel
circuits. An introduction to series and parallel RLC circuits.

Analogue Electronics (25%)
Introduction to the properties of an ideal operational amplifier. Simple inverting and non-inverting applications using virtual earth principles. Properties and parameters of a non-ideal op-amplifier including gain-bandwidth. Op-amplifier applications including summing, integrator and differentiator.

More information

KD4011 -

Fundamentals of Energy Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This is a project-oriented design-based learning module, which introduces you to the fundamental concepts of energy systems. The underlying electrical engineering, physics and mathematics is illustrated using examples from electricity generation, transmission, distribution, consumption and storage. Ficus is given to develop unique design skills over a wide range of scenarios.
Basics of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Voltage, current, power and energy. Conservation of energy. Basic electromagnetism. Electric charge: conductors, insulators and semiconductors. Electric field. Electrostatic potential energy and potential. Magnetic field and magnetic flux density. Electromagnetic induction: Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law. Electric generator. Electric and Magnetic Circuits. Basics of electric motors and generators.

Three phase power and power electronic devices
Production of three-phase power. Phase and line voltages and currents in star and delta systems. Measurements of three-phase power. Introduction to single-phase transformer: principle, construction, referring of impedances, losses and efficiency, and equivalent circuit. Transformer Connections (Autotransformers and three-phase transformers). Overview of power electronics: Rectifiers and inverters for renewable energy integration

Power generation, energy efficiency and energy storage
Overview of conventional power generation system: gas and coal-fired power stations, combined heat and power, IGCC, nuclear power. Load curve and load factor. Fundamentals of power transmission and distribution. Load, Fundamentals of wind energy and solar energy conversion systems. Energy storage technologies

More information

KD4014 -

Research, Analysis and Presentation (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to gathering research data from either laboratory or reference material, analysing the acquired data in an appropriate manner and then presenting the key findings. Formal training in experimental techniques acquired in this module will support your professional and personal skills.

Research
You will learn about methods to conduct research methods based on an open-ended research question provided by the tutors. You will learn: where and how to gather information, which can be applied to generate solutions to real world problems. The ability to select from a number of research methods is important, for example, the ability to research a method to design simple laboratory tests.

Analysis
Correct use of units and symbols for physics and engineering along with the use of data analysis techniques. Specific techniques may include, for example, mean and standard deviation, simple regressive techniques, log-log and log-linear relationships, and error analysis. Simple measurement techniques may include, for example, measuring velocity, voltage, current and power. Key factors in measurement include the need to analyse the accuracy, errors, resolution and the need for calibration. You will be introduced to suitable computational packages for data analysis and processing in physics and engineering.

Presentation
You will develop key communication skills in report writing, laboratory book writing (of laboratory data), and the presentation of information both visually (via graphs and diagrams) and using text. You will develop skills in processing information, for example, highlighting key findings and drawing suitable conclusions from a piece of work, and presenting the information in both written and oral format.

Group work
Communicating and working effectively in teams is a highly sought-after skill by employers. While working in a group with other students, you will develop skills in communication and project management. You will be responsible for managing individual tasks while ensuring completion of the group tasks. You will also be introduced to tools to keep track of your professional development throughout your programme

More information

KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KC5002 -

Advanced Engineering Mathematics (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with two key concepts in Mathematics: Laplace Transforms and periodic functions. You will learn their use in solving ordinary differential equations arising from real world physical problems, and their use in describing the behaviour of simple control systems. The concept of the harmonic components of a periodic waveform will be introduced to you and be shown how this is useful in matching general solutions of partial differential equations to particular boundary or initial conditions. The solution of systems of linear ordinary differential equations using matrix methods will also be considered.


Outline Syllabus
Laplace Transforms: Definition, simple transforms, linearity. First shift theorem. Inverse transforms, linearity, use of the first shift theorem and partial fractions. Transforms of derivatives. Transforms of an integral. The Heaviside Unit Step function. The second shift theorem. Solution of linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, including systems of such equations. The Delta function and the Impulse Response function; transfer function. Initial and final-value theorems. Convolution and the convolution theorem. Poles of the transfer function and stability. Steady-state response. (50%)

Periodic functions and Fourier series: Full-range and half-range series, even and odd functions and coefficients in complex form. Application to the solution of partial differential equations by the method of separation of variables. (25%)

Matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors: Algebraic evaluation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix, application to the solution of a system of linear ordinary differential equations. (25%)

The module will be delivered using a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is by formal examination.

More information

KD5064 -

Analogue Electronics and Instrumentation (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn on module key technical content around two themes that of analogue electronics and instrumentation. These are important topics for electrical engineering covering the key basics of analogue design and the use of analogue signals used in instrumentation. Amplifiers and signal conditioning devices will be covered that convert the sensor output into usable signals for typical process control platforms. Operational amplifiers will be used extensively in the module, leading up to an understanding of discrete electronic transistor design.

Operational Amplifiers - Operational amplifier applications applied to instrumentation signals, active filter circuits, and instrumentation amplifiers. Filter considerations including magnitude and phase bode diagrams, and compensation methods.

Sensors - Temperature, strain and light sensor systems looking into devices and signals. Additional sensors considered may also include slot encoders, accelerometers and hall-effect devices.

Instrumentation - Amplifiers and signal conditioning demonstrates the ability for signal conversion and used in real world environments. Operational amplifiers will be expanded upon with the design of the instrumentation amplifier to highlight the performance improvements. Noise analysis will be introduced to show how instrumentation techniques reduce this phenomenon.

Discrete Electronics - Operational amplifiers are made from discrete elements; these building blocks will be explained include the Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs) and the Field Effect Transistor (FET). Transistor applications may include current sources, current sinks, and differential input stages.

More information

KD5065 -

C Programming and Digital Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your capabilities in the areas of digital systems, building on the hardware and software design and development techniques covered in previous related module(s).

In the Hardware Description Language (HDL) section, you learn about technology and architecture. The concept of HDL as a tool to simulate, design and document digital systems is introduced and you will learn how to design, specify, and apply digital combinational and sequential building blocks in isolation, and as part of a larger system. Then the module introduces an industry standard HDL known as Verilog, and shows how it can be used to describe, at the gate and logic expression level, digital building blocks such as decoders, multiplexers, encoders, shift registers and counters. During the course, you are given the opportunity to explore designs by means of simulation using industry standard design tools from raw Verilog code to the simulation state. You will learn how the HDL code is used for actual low-level hardware design implementation and they will also cover other practical aspects of digital hardware design, such as logic hazards, propagation delays and interfacing with other digital modules.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your Verilog code including:
1- K-map simplification
2- Timing analysis
3- Synthesizable vs non-synthesizable code
4- Finite state machine (FSM) and state diagram
5- Using built-in simulation task/function
6- IP blocks
7- Icarus Verilog
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for simulation and programming a FPGA device.

In the Programming Language section, you will learn about the architecture of microcontrollers and concept of embedded systems. ARM-based microcontroller as well as various ARM-compatible operating systems will be introduced. You will learn about different types of compilers and toolchain, and they will use the C++ language to program an ARM platform to program hardware to perform high-level tasks such as IO port access, serial connection, memory management, FSM, and string manipulation. An overview of C++ language will be given to you and advanced topics such as pointer and classes in C++ are taught. Controlling peripherals such as analogue to digital converter (ADC), digital to analogue converter (DAC), WiFi, X-Bee is introduced as well as data communication protocols such as I2C, and SPI. you will learn how to communicate with a PC application based on Python, Matlab, or LabVIEW through wired connection. The IoT technology and cloud services for microcontroller platforms are also introduced and you will become familiar with AWS and Azure.
The You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your C++ code including:
1- Debugging
2- Linter
3- QEMU
4- PlatformIO
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for simulation and programming an ARM platform.

In the PCB Design section, you will learn how to manifest your digital system concepts into an actual PCB. You will start by learning about design level and component level considerations. Then they will learn how to find appropriate component for the board and create the schematic to describe the circuit netlist. The component footprints are introduced, and you learn how to create the PCB layout and route it. Next, they are taught how to prepare your design for manufacturing and lastly what are the required post-manufacturing tasks.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your PCB design including:
1- High-speed design tips
2- Track calculation
3- EMI and EMC
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for building a schematic and PCB in software environment.

In the Code Development section, you will learn how to develop a code from a concept. You will get familiar with the concept of structured programming and code hierarchy and learn about techniques to produce clean code. Then the concepts of test code, debugging, and version control are introduced, and tips are given on how to perform code maintenance. At the end tyou will learn how to create a customised library for the digital board that they designed in PCB Design section.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your code including:
1- Flowchart
2- UML
3- Git
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for developing a library code.

More information

KD5066 -

Communication Systems (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about electronic communications. You will learn fundamental techniques that are used in communication systems for sending information between two devices. You will learn a number of techniques that are used in modern day communication systems to transfer information both via a physical connection such as a cable and also via a wireless connection.

Two of the key themes of electronic communications that you will study are Analogue communication and Digital communication. In both themes you will learn a number of key engineering processes that are fundamental to communications. In analogue communications you will learn the key physical and electronic processes necessary to transfer information in an analogue form. You will also explore current technologies and techniques in radio and satellite communications. In the digital communications topic, the knowledge that you learn in analogue communications will be expanded to a higher level to allow you to understand the key requirements for digital communication. We will examine how communication techniques have evolved over the years to allow users to transfer vast amounts of information at ever increasing speeds.

Three key areas within these two topics are identified:

ANALOGUE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
Amplitude Modulation; comparison of various forms of AM, demodulation, frequency and phase insertion errors, examples and applications. Frequency modulation; NBFM, WBFM, spectra and bandwidth, examples and applications. Transmission and reception circuits. Attenuation in radio systems. Modern systems and standards.


DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
Spectra of rectangular waveforms, bit rates, baud rates and relationship to bandwidth. line codes and shaping. ASK, FSK, PSK, generation and demodulation, spectrum and bandwidth. Comparison of bandwidth and power. Quadrature carrier systems. OSI reference model. Asynchronous and synchronous communications. The serial data link. Protocols. FDM and TDM multiplexing. Parity and CRC principles and implementation. Networks. IP addressing

OPTICAL SYSTEMS
Optical sources; structure, performance and frequency response. Detectors. Fibres; modes, dispersion, optimum wavelength, coupling and splicing.

More information

KD5067 -

Power Machine and Renewable Energy (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to the principles of operation of power systems, and enhance your knowledge of electrical machinery, power electronics and renewable energy. It will also allow you to consider the interaction between these system components.

A power network typically integrates power generators, distribution grid, transformers, transmission lines, and loads. This module provides you with an introduction to power system structure, and the principles of electrical machines. Moreover, low-carbon energy sources have increasingly contributed to the current power network, and power electronics play a key role in energy conversion. Therefore, the module also provides you with an introduction to renewable energy, and power electronics. Specifically, you will learn the following from this module:

POWER SYSTEMS (30%):
Principles and construction of single-phase transformers, equivalent circuits, efficiency and regulation, open and short circuit tests, connections of 3-phase transformers, and vector groups. Basics of powers, and power flow. Per unit systems and fundamentals of balanced fault level calculations.

ELECTRIC MACHINES (30%):
Principles and construction of DC machines, equivalent circuit, starting and speed control. Principles and construction of induction machines, expressions for speed of rotating field and slip, rotor power balance, torque-slip curve, and modern control techniques.

POWER ELECTRONICS (20%):
Fundamentals of power electronics and converters (AC-DC, DC-DC, and AC-AC etc.), and PWM control.

RENEWABLE ENERGY (20%):
Application of the knowledge of power systems, power electronics and power machines to a variety of renewable systems, such as hydro, photovoltaics, wind, combined heat and power, fuel cells, tidal and marine power plants, and illustration of their operating principles, types, characteristics and comparisons. Overview of electricity generation technologies from new and renewable energy, current contributions and future prospects. fored heat and power, fuel cells, tidal and marine power plants.

More information

KD5080 -

Electrical Product Development (Core,20 Credits)

This module provides you with the knowledge and skills required to research, design, implement and manage the development of an electrical/electronic product. Specifically, you will learn:
• Systems level approach to product design and development.
• The use of online databases to search for patents and research current market trends.
• Project management and the use of Gantt charts.
• Project specification development, project design, electronic/electrical and mechanical design.
• Use of simulation tools, PCB design and rapid prototyping.
• Design analysis and selection, design for manufacturing, product life cycle and product costing.
• Standards and legal issues: market and technical risk assessment, intellectual property, product end of life considerations.
• Ethical aspects, social aspects, and environmental aspects of electrical/electronic engineering product development.
• Communication skills: Pitching technical ideas to general and technical audience.
• Engineering report writing, style, citation tools and content.
• Tracking and managing your professional skill development.

More information

KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KL5006 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

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KL5007 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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KL5008 -

Work placement semester (Optional,60 Credits)

This module operates within a partnership between the University, employer and yourself, and provides you with the opportunity to develop core competencies and employability skills relevant to your programme of study in a work based environment.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, within the appropriate working environments.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the placement is recognised both in your transcript as a 60 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

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KL5009 -

MPEE - Study Abroad Semester (Optional,60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one semester as part of your programme.

This is a 60 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad semester will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as an additional 60 credits for Engineering and Environment Study Abroad Semester.

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KD6010 -

Power Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to develop your knowledge, understanding and the ability to analyse the components of a modern power system. It allows you to study the components and operation of power systems, highlighting the principles, design, control, performance limits and protection from abnormal conditions. The theory, control and the properties of alternators, transmission lines, switchgear and protection will also be covered. Commercial issues surrounding the economics of power generation, electricity market and quality of supply are also explored. This module also gives you the opportunity to critically analyse and develop an understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as load flow, fault and stability studies together with methods for voltage and frequency control, including the use of modern FACTS technologies. These and other topics will be reinforced by using real-world examples and case studies, with emphasis on the use of modern technologies in power systems.

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KD6024 -

Individual Engineering Project (40 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with an opportunity to carry out an extended study in a specific area of Engineering, developing your ability to work independently and promoting self-reliance. Guidance on how to source and assess the appropriateness of information is provided to you by the module tutor.

A key aim is to encourage you to apply theoretical and analytical techniques to problem solve. The module also aims to develop both verbal and written communication skills. The project will provide practical experience of drawing up a project specification defining aims, objectives and identifying an envisaged endpoint. With the supervisor’s guidance, you will prepare a project plan that includes a Gantt chart, project background and sourcing previous work and associated theory/simulation to assess whether the aims and objectives are achievable and that your theoretical basis is sound.

To meet University requirements and gain practical experience, you must perform a risk assessment to identify potential risks/hazards associated with the project. You will follow the defined plan to complete the project that will involve the application of appropriate theory and simulations leading to the production of prototype designs.

You will be encouraged to monitor your progress based upon the project plan and complete the design cycle by testing and redesign, if necessary. A final project report and verbal/poster presentation to the supervisor, second markers and peers are required towards the end of the module. You must maintain contact with the supervisor on a regular basis to discuss/assess progress and obtain advice. As a part of developing employability skills throughout the programme, you will continue to update and record your professional development.

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KD6025 -

Design and Manufacturing Analysis (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with an analytical approach to the issues around both the design and manufacturing of electronic or electrical products. In this respect you have two clear sections, linked by an analysis approach to determine functionality within the bounds of manufacturability.

Design Analysis
• Operational amplifier construction with a view to component reduction and therefore performance degradation. Analysis is therefore required to pinpoint the performance of sub-optimal designs with suitable engineering compromises being found.
• Differential amplifier structures as applied to Instrumentation design, is explored with mathematical rigor to establish their fundamental performance limits.
• Circuit design (typically filters) with consideration of the circuit performance when non-ideal components are used.
• Other complex analysis methods are introduced including: Sensitivity analysis, Tolerance analysis, and Monticarlo analysis.

Manufacturing Analysis
1. Electronics Manufacturing Yield - the performance of electronic yield predictions, with typical examples provided from Integrated Circuit Manufacture.
2. Reliability in Electronics Manufacturing - electronic reliability under the factors of cost, performance availability
3. Waste Management in Electronic Components - green electronic issues and legislation which affect both electronic product design and
manufacturing aspects,
4. Lean Manufacturing - in manufacturing technology illustrating the philosophy of lean manufacturing

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KD6026 -

Digital Signal Processing Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to make use of the knowledge and analytic skills developed throughout the programme to design modern digital signal processing systems.

In this module you will learn:

• The fundamental concepts of discrete-time signals and systems.
• The fundamental mathematical transforms for time-domain and frequency domain representations.
• The design of digital filters; finite impulse filter and infinite impulse filter.
• The practical implementation of digital filters in simulation and hardware.

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KD6027 -

Embedded Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn the architecture, and how to program a high performance microcontroller - ARM cortex series. You will learn how to apply the mathematical, natural science and engineering principles and knowledge in electrical and electronic engineering in an integrated approach to solve the problem of embedded systems with link to real world problems, by using the recent embedded hardware and software technologies. You will also learn how to critically analyse the performance of the embedded systems to verify if a given performance requirement and specification is met, with comprehensive consideration of safety environmental and commercial matters. You will learn how to write a technical report on complex engineering matters with critical evaluation of the performance of the embedded system you design.

Specifically this will include:
- A consideration of the relative merits of a number of commercially available microcontrollers
- Embedded software engineering and lifecyle of embedded system development
- Flowchart for embedded software system design
- A detailed investigation of the ARM cortex series of microcontrollers, including architecture, peripherals and capabilities.
- Using ARM IDE development tools to compose, compile and fault find programs written in a high level programming language ('C').
- Features of the ARM microcontroller that will be considered are:
- Clock generation - internal/external
- GPIO - general purpose input/output
- ADC - analogue to digital converter
- USART, SPI, I2C - serial communications
- Timers
- Interrupt capability

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KD6028 -

Digital System Design and Implementation (Optional,20 Credits)

The module aims to show you how to design and implement digital systems using a range of powerful techniques and tools, such as Finite State Machines (FSMs) and Programmable Logic. A central theme of the module is the use of a Hardware Description Language (HDL), and how it can be used to describe and verify a digital design at a behavioural level. Practical sessions, involving the use of industry standard simulation, synthesis, and implementation software, will be used to provide experience of the complete digital system design flow, from concept to realisation. In addition to the use of HDLs, this module also considers some of the key low-level aspects of digital systems, including Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) circuits and their performance and optimisation using circuit-level simulation.

This module also aims to develop your understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as testing and ‘Design-for-Test’. These and other topics will be reinforced using real-world case examples and designs.

The commercial issues surrounding digital system realisation using a variety of technologies will be explored, with emphasis on Programmable Logic. The design of FSMs is methodically introduced, and synchronous and asynchronous FSMs are covered. The Petri Net is also introduced and used to create both sequential and parallel based FSMs. All these FSM methods are used to synthesise digital systems to meet required specifications.

This module will provide you with the skills you require to practice digital system design in an industrial context, making use of real-world design problems and industry standard software. Case studies, based on industrial consultancy work carried out by academic staff, will be used as examples to enhance your employability.

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KD6029 -

Wireless and RF Systems Design (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your skills in electronic communications with specific reference to key techniques that are used in radio frequency (RF) communications. You will be exposed to the theory, design and analysis of all key aspects of RF and wireless communication systems.

All wireless communication systems consists of two key areas, namely high frequency circuit design and antenna design. Within high frequency circuit design
you will learn how to modify the performance of RF signals and will cover the key concepts of microwave circuit design for wireless and RF systems. Once the RF signal has been generated, it must then be converted to a signal that can be transmitted through air. This is the second key concept and will be covered in the second part of the module – namely antenna design and propagation. The antenna design section covers the key principles of transmitting an RF signal through free space. The antenna design topic also examines the key concepts of antenna design related to modern communication systems, including mobile telephone systems from 1G to 5G. A further key part of any mobile communication device is the interaction between circuit design and antenna design and will also be covered in this module.


For Microwave circuit design typical topics include: Transmission Line Basics, Smith Chart, Impedance Matching techniques, Lumped Elements, Impedance / Admittance parameters, ABCD parameters , S-parameters, Passive microwave circuits.

For Antenna design typical topics include: Basic antenna parameters, outline of antenna types, wires, apertures, dishes, patch antennas, antennas required for
mobile systems, Structure of Cellular systems. Base station design, Typical RF transmitter layout, Antenna types for mobile handset and base stations. Factors affecting reception.

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KD6030 -

Optical Communications System Design (Optional,20 Credits)

The module will provide the knowledge and skills for you in two key themes of optical fibre and optical wireless communications. These are essential topics in electrical and electronics engineering programme that cover the fundamentals and advanced optical system designs in both fibre and wireless systems. Optical fibre communications provides the backbone for long-haul and medium range telecommunications that offers ultrahigh data transmission capacity whereas optical wireless communications is an emerging technology that enables data transmission via light, either in infrared or visible light band using laser and/or light emitting diode (LED) for indoor and short range communications system.

Through the module syllabus you will learn:

Fundamental optical fibre/wireless communications includes
- Introduction to the optical wire/wireless communications system and the overall design
- Identification of system elements, subsystems and required specifications
- Optical transmitter design, optical propagation channel, effect on the optical fibre, effect on the optical wireless channel, noise and losses, optical receiver design.

System design includes: multiple access techniques, system design and performance evaluation, analysis of the practical and industrial optical communications system

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KD6031 -

Instrumentation and Control of Dynamical Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module shows you how to use modern control design techniques based on state-space differential equations governing a dynamical system. You will also cover instrumentation techniques that are required for practical implementation of control algorithms. Upon completion of the module, you will be able to design instrumentation and control systems; implement and evaluate them using relevant software packages. There are two main themes:
Control:
• Conventional and modern control design and analysis
• Description of dynamic control systems using differential equations, transfer functions, and state-space representation.
• Control system analysis, including dynamic responses of systems, stability and controllability of systems.
• Control system design, including design via open- and closed-loop systems, state and output feedback controls
• Analysis and design of digital systems.
• Use of software packages for simulation of control systems.
Instrumentation:
• Range, span, nonlinearity, hysteresis, resolution, ageing effects.
• Dynamic modelling of sensors using transfer functions and state-space methods.
• Signal conditioning: loading effects, bridge circuits, correction of non-linearity, effects of feedback, amplifier limitations.
• Noise and interference in instrumentation systems and estimation of errors.
• Signal recovery from noise interference.
• Computerised data acquisition systems including ADCs and a range of modern instrumentation protocols.
• Use software packages for simulation of instrumentation systems.

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KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KL6068 -

Satellite Systems and Space Environment (Optional,20 Credits)

The module provides students with skills and knowledge to develop scientific and/or electronic systems for space applications. The topics covered are:

The space environment - launch, orbits, rocket equation, drag, radiation, vacuum, thermal gradients.

Satellite systems and system development for space applications - radio communication, ground stations and link budgets, solar power, data processing, Earth observation, optimisation of systems for space, materials choice for space, component characteristics, mechanical and thermal testing.

Product Acceptance and Qualification Assurance for space – industry standards for space-worthy design, functional testing, simulation of operations, verification and validation processes.

Environmental Testing – theory and practice of vibration testing, resonant sweeps, shock tests and random noise tests. Theory and practice of thermal vacuum testing, the effect of vacuum on electronics and thermal cycling. Theory and practice of radiation testing, how radiation effects electronics, how to design to be radiation tolerant, and testing components in the x-ray irradiator.

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KL6069 -

Smart Energy System (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a lab-based group project to develop more design and practical skills for a final year of an undergraduate degree programme in electrical and electronic discipline. You will learn a wide range of extensive knowledge of electronic engineering subjects through undertaking the project, including on the microprocessor-based control system, internet of things (IoT), power conversion, and battery energy storage. You will be motivated to explore problems in real-world applications of electronics and address challenges using the developed skills.

This module will build on the skills acquired through previous study and gain some new knowledge to extend the practical experience of the students into the following areas:

• IoT cloud - based structure using microprocessors
• Modelling, Design and control of simple power DC-DC converter
• Battery charging/discharging and management techniques (e.g. state-of-charge and state-of-health estimation)
• Solar electric power generation
• Maximum power point tracking techniques
• DC motor drive and control
• Advanced programming

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KC7047 -

Applied Engineering Statistics (Core,20 Credits)

In this module, you will develop and apply the statistical techniques required for the analysis and modelling of engineering systems.

In the first half of the Semester the module is delivered through a series of lectures, with accompanying seminars, on requisite material, followed in the second half by assessed independent and group work associated with two case studies, assessed either by a PowerPoint or poster presentation.

You will receive on-going formative feedback during seminars in the first half of the semester, with both written and verbal feedback of their assessed work in the second half.

The two statistical modelling case studies will focus on regression analysis and time series, which are commonly required in engineering disciplines.

Outline Syllabus
Mathematical modelling
Modelling techniques, development, appraisal and modification. (20%)

Statistical methods
Generalised linear and non linear models. Curvilinear and non linear regression models. Analysis of variance and linear logistic model. Testing of model suitability. (40%)

Operational research and time series
Time series characteristics. Trends, moving averages and stationarity. Autocorrelation and tests of randomness. Queuing theory and its application. (40%)

Use of appropriate statistical software (e.g. R).

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KD7011 -

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will consider the current practices and technological advances in the design, control, mathematical modelling, and performance optimisation of modern Wind Energy Conversion Systems. You will apply the necessary knowledge and gain understanding of the main concepts, methodologies, and future developments in this field. The module syllabus includes, but is not limited to, the following topics: wind energy resource; operating principles, characteristics and types of wind turbines; commercial and emerging distributed wind generators; power electronic converter topologies for variable speed systems; turbine aero-dynamics; grid-connected and stand-alone applications; research and development aspects; environmental and social context and issues; regulations and standards; economics, employment opportunities etc.

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KD7019 -

Advanced Embedded System Design Technology (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will cover the broad topic of Microprocessors and Microcontrollers and how they are used in Embedded Systems. This will involve investigating processor architectures, operating modes and interfacing to peripherals. Examples of structures from current industrial vendors such as ATMEL, ARM, and Microchip will be explored and examined. You will consider the hardware design and development of embedded microcontroller systems, including implementations for controlling both internal and external interfaces and peripherals. Careful examination of Real-Time control issues, interrupts and microcontroller interactions will be analysed. This will allow you to be able to design the necessary hardware for microcontroller-based systems to meet a client’s specification.

To support the implementation of hardware designs software development of Embedded Microcontroller Systems will be employed looking at both low level assembly language/machine code programming through to C programming. The techniques employed will cover code generation procedures, structured programming techniques, reusable library functions and top down/bottom up programming methods.
All these techniques will be applied case studies based upon industrial research activities. Typical applications include:

These will cover areas such as temperature monitoring, algorithmic techniques; message passing systems and communication protocols.

Microcontroller technology has a broad range of applications within industry and research environments. Employing the use of a sophisticated ARM module exposes students to the diverse implementations, of such modules, and provides the key technical skills required by industry essential to modern digital and communication systems.

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KD7020 -

Digital Design Automation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your capabilities in the areas of digital systems by means of high-level languages including C/C++ and Python.

The module starts by introducing digital system design and an overview of HDL tools. The concept of HLS and its application in high-level engineering design problems are then introduced, and several comparisons are carried out to highlight the difference and benefits of HLS. C/C++ programming language is presented as the HLS tool and you are given an overview of different data types, arrays, loops, and conditions in C/C++. You will learn the implementation of both sequential and combinational circuits in HLS as well as the concept of testbench and will learn how to apply the concept of testbench to real-world problems and how to simulate the real devices and digital components in your testbench. Through examples, you also will learn about FSM and design hierarchy and the benefit of clean code in a project. The HLS section then continues with the topic of parallelism, IP, and synthesis and concludes by looking at other methods of programming FPGA including SystemC, OpenCL, LabVIEW, and Matlab.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your HLS code including:
1- Simulation
2- Debugging
3- FSM design tool
4- C/C++ standard library
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for simulation and programming a FPGA device using C/C++.

Another section of the module is devoted to programming FPGA using Python language also known as Pynq technology. You will start by understanding SoC and Xilinx Zynq family architectures. Then you will learn the fundamental requirements of Python for FPGA programming such as commonly used keywords and package management. The structure of Pynq is covered and implementing Python code in Jupyter is then explained through several examples and you learn how to apply your acquired knowledge to real world problems. You then will be briefly introduced to topics including digital signal processing (DSP), artificial intelligence (AL), machine learning (ML), software defined radio (SDR), and their common and cutting-edge applications in daily life and industry. The section concludes with looking at concept of embedded ARM cores in FPGA and running operating system (OS) on SoC.

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KD7047 -

Photovoltaic Cell and Module Technology (Optional,20 Credits)

The module delivers four main themes of theoretical and technical content related to solar cell devices and modules within the field of Solar photovoltaics.
You will consider themes that include an introduction to the characteristics of the Sun that are relevant to solar cell operation. The solar spectrum and its intensity and total energy available from the sun, will be presented. Relevant semiconductor physics together with important semiconductor materials used in solar cells will be introduced. Underpinning quantum theory, required to understand energy bandgap, direct and indirect transitions and the electrical and optical behaviour of these materials, will also be reviewed.

Important processes used for the production of semiconductor materials and solar cells will be introduced together with ideal solar cell devices based on the p-n junction. Processes used to produce crystalline silicon as well as the other semiconductor materials and device component layers as well as techniques for controlling the electrical and device behaviour, will be presented.

Ideal behaviour of the junction will be considered under equilibrium conditions and the electrical behaviour derived. This will be extended to consider the behaviour when operating as a solar cell under illumination to include key performance parameters such as the open circuit current, short circuit current and cell conversion efficiency.

The module will proceed to introduce factors that affect solar cell behaviour under non-ideal conditions. The influence of temperature and the quality of electrical contacts on device performance will be examined. Finally, an overview of device characterisation techniques, module design and applications of photovoltaic devices will be presented.

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KD7049 -

Photovoltaic Development and Implementation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module considers the development of photovoltaic technology, in terms of photovoltaic cell design and manufacturing advances, the progress in economic and
environmental aspects and the definition and use of policy measures to aid market development. You will develop a wide range of skills from the understanding of
research directions and how these can lead to improvement of cell and system performance to the ability to conduct economic and environmental assessments of current and
new technologies. This wide range of subjects will equip the student to contribute to the development of photovoltaics as it becomes a mainstream energy source worldwide.
An overview of the subjects to be studied is provided below:

• Advanced photovoltaic cell design (high efficiency approaches, multijunction concepts, material reduction strategies, organic and polymer cells)
• Advanced characterisation methods (methods to determine the detailed performance of advanced cell concepts)
• Economic analysis methods (economic theory, production economics, financing mechanisms)
• Environmental impact assessment (process definition, hazard assessment, embodied energy and emissions analysis)
• Policy issues (market development, climate change and security aspects, government policies and market development approaches)

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KD7050 -

Photovoltaic System Technology (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module, you will learn about the principles of photovoltaic (PV) system, design, operation and application. This will include consideration of the system components and the design and configuration of the solar array, together with examples of stand-alone, grid-connected and space applications. The module will also help you to appreciate the critical issues relating to the implementation of photovoltaic systems.

The topics within the module syllabus include:
• PV arrays and system components
• Grid connected PV systems, including large scale and building integrated systems
• Stand-alone PV systems and applications
• Concentrator PV systems
• PV arrays for satellite power supply
• Monitoring and performance analysis
• Operation and maintenance, system lifetime, standards and regulations

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KD7051 -

Interdisciplinary Team Engineering Project (40 Credits)

This module provides you with the opportunity to take an integrated approach to the application of both your specialist and non-specialist knowledge and skills within an industrial or research-based project. You will work in a team around a substantial interdisciplinary (e.g. electrical, mechanical and control engineering, physicists, chemists) project involving the development of a product, from concept to design and fabrication through to critical evaluation and redesign.
This project will provide you with enhanced preparation for professional practice with diversity and inclusion within the workplace, as well as integrate technical expertise, reflecting on the security implications and mitigations, with business, commercial, ethical and social concerns. You will also have the opportunity to experience working across engineering/sciences disciplines, while developing team leadership attributes.

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KD7063 -

Wireless Communication Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to the concepts, structure and organisation of wireless communications from a system point of view, thus illustrating the theoretical concepts and their application in practical scenarios. Wireless communication systems including the old analogue as well all digital technologies based on the optical and radio frequencies will be introduced. In addition, you will learn about the fundamental theoretical concepts for both radio and optical based wireless communications.

The module syllabus:

• Communication Regulation: Regulating authorities; standards organisation; frequency spectrum, and power usage.

• Radio Communication: System and subsystem specifications for radio based communication including antennas and propagation mechanisms; cellular wireless systems, traffic engineering; noise and interference; noise factor and cascaded systems; wireless channel; link budget calculations; frequency re-use; GSM; multi-path propagation.

• Optical Wireless Communications: Including the concept of indoor optical wireless systems; diffused and line of sight links; optical channel characteristics; noise sources; and optical path link budgets.

• Digital Communication: M-ary modulation and demodulation; coherent and non-coherent systems; signalling space and constellation diagrams; BER performance of different modulation formats; matched filter detection.

• Multiplexing and Multiple Access: TDM, FDM, TDMLA, FDMA and CDMA.

The syllabus will allow you to understand and pursue careers of communication system design and deployment within the telecommunications industry. This module together with other modules such as the high level system design and high level digital / analogue circuit design will give you the skills and expertise required within the telecommunications and computer network industries, as well as preparing you to do further studies in the this and relevant fields.

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KD7064 -

Optical Communications System (Optional,20 Credits)

The module will provide you with the knowledge and skills in system design around two key themes of optical fibre and optical wireless communications. These are essential topics for modern telecommunications and cover advanced optical system designs as well as including industrial standards in both fibre and wireless systems. Optical fibre communications provides the backbone long-haul and medium range telecommunications that offers ultrahigh data transmission capacity whereas optical wireless communications is an emerging technology. This technology enables data transmission, either in the infrared or visible light bands, employing lasers or light emitting diodes (LED) for indoor and short range communications system.

The module syllabus covers the technical analysis of optical fibre and wireless communications both at a system and sub-system level. Performance calculations and design considerations are covered, specifically in the areas of optical transmitters and receivers, Careful examination of performance limiters will be defined and methods to offset them will be explored and analysed for optimum design. These limiters include such effects as modulation, noise, dispersion, modal transmission, multipath effects, diffusion, fog, turbulence, smoke etc.

System performance is developed and explored to maximise the capability of a communication channel covering such aspects as link budgets, multiplexing techniques, BER analysis etc. allowing the performance criteria being characterised to meet a system specification

With these developed skills and knowledge you will be able to undertake the design and analysis of a complex optical communication system, making judicial choices and improvements.

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KD7066 -

Analogue Electronic Design (Optional,20 Credits)

Within this module you will learn some of the key design and development skills needed for analogue electronics. The module will run through a number of fundamental building blocks of circuit design to enable you to design and develop from a high level abstraction in circuit design. The module supports this learning though the use of specific tools mixed in with key design theory along with practical lab based skills for the development and design of analogue circuitry using optimisation techniques.

Computer Aided Design (CAD)
Experimentation based on the use and application of an industry standard CAD package (for example, OrCAD or Mentor Graphics). Use of CAD tools to experiment with a number of circuit structures to derive their function and application inside of an abstract CAD environment.
Components, Bipolar device operation and modelling in association with passive components. The design needs for the layout of components, including some of the key parameters needed for modelling inside a CAD environment.

Analogue Design
Design of fundamental analogue cell structures, including switches, active resistors, current sources and current sinks. The design of current mirrors from basic to more advanced supply voltage independent mirrors, and voltage and current references. Integrated circuit level design of the building blocks of communications, for example, low noise amplifiers, mixers, phase locked loops and oscillators.

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KD7068 -

Renewable Energy Technologies for Electricity Supply (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides you with the opportunity to study the operation of the renewable energy technologies used for electricity generation, covering the aspects of resource assessment, operating characteristics, typical performance levels, economics, and environmental impact. You will also consider the context of the use of renewable energy systems, including aspects relating to power electronics techniques with grid connection and enabling technologies in power processing and energy storage.

The module introduces you to all the renewable technologies that can be used to generate electricity, including solar, water, wind, geothermal and biomass technologies. In addition, other type of renewable energy generation, power conversion and control techniques as well as energy storage technologies associated with the smart grids (e.g. electrical vehicles, power to hydrogen technologies etc) will be covered in this course module.

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KD7069 -

Power Electronics and Drive Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with thorough understanding and knowledge of existing and new concepts and technologies in electrical power engineering, and apply the knowledges on design and industrial applications of power electronics and electric motor drives. You will cover the principles of advanced control techniques as applied to these systems. The module is specifically concerned with the following subjects: power electronics devices and conventional converter topologies; pulse-width-modulation (PWM) techniques; state of the art practical switching power converters; power quality and harmonic analysis of various power conversion systems; power electronics control of renewable energy sources including solar, wind, and fuel-cell energy systems as well as electric and hybrid vehicles; electric machines and drives fundamentals; space-vector theory, control and applications of DC and AC drives; vector and field-oriented control of high performance induction and synchronous motor drives; applications and efficiency of electric drives; regulations, standards and other professional issues.

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KD7070 -

Smart Grids (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to deepen your understanding and ability to study existing electrical power distribution networks and to consider new concepts and technologies for future ‘smart grid’ power networks. Emphasis will be given to the integration of renewable energy resources, electric vehicles, enabling technologies and the quality of supply. The module also covers advanced power electronics controllers and ICT techniques as applied to the smart grid.

This module also gives you the opportunity to critically analyse and develop an understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as, quality of supply, cost considerations, regulations and standards. It explores the role of the built environment in the whole energy system, with a focus on the integration of renewables, demand response and static/ mobile energy storage. You will develop skills in modelling, and the visualisation and discussion of results, through applying your knowledge to develop techno-economic models of case studies.

Topics covered will be reinforced by the use of real-world examples and case studies. Published papers and simulation will be uploaded in elp and it can provide a good experience for students to see where the proposed algorithms/ methods will be applied.

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KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KL7022 -

Engineering Technology Management (Core,20 Credits)

In this module students will learn about Strategic Management, Project Management including Project Definition and its links to Project Success through the Management of Risk as well as Planning and Control of projects. Students will learn about management techniques and professional issues associated with relevant industry and society. They will enhance their critical reflection, analysis and other transferable skills which will aid their studies and support their career progression after graduating.

In addition, students will consider the role of ethics in delivering a Business Strategy and in their role as a manager. The Learning and Teaching strategy will engage students with lectures and online resources, much guided and independent reading about theory and practice as well as seminars where they will develop and improve their abilities and skills through reflection, discussion, and argument. The assessment will seek to move students from passive gatherers of knowledge to active participants in management decision making. Through the process they will refine and improve their own approaches to solving management problems in the subject disciplines. Students are required to critically analyse the management environment and to propose solution based on the module theory.

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KL7023 -

Smart Microsystems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a background in microengineering in general and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) in particular. This module will build on the skills acquired through previous study and gain some new knowledge to extend the experience of the students into the following areas:

• Micromachining and microfabrication techniques,
• Thin-film processes, photolithography, deposition and etching techniques for microsystems fabrication,
• Analytical and finite-element method-based analysis of microsystems,
• Transduction mechanisms,
• Design and analysis of micromachined sensors and actuators.

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Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KC4010 -

Engineering Mathematics (Core,20 Credits)

This course will introduce and delve into the following maths concepts

Basic algebra and trigonometry
This course develops the foundational mathematics skills and language set that underpin analytical sciences. This will include the transposition and manipulation of algebraic expressions, the notion of functions and the basics of trigonometry

Basic calculus
We will define the derivative, how one quantity can change with respect to another, and learn how to compute these. We will also encounter the integral, related to areas and averages, and tackle computations involving these

Complex numbers
This course introduces complex numbers, important in electrical engineering and beyond, and teaches students about their property, their algebra and how these numbers can be understood geometrically.

Further Calculus
Further into the course, we will build upon our understanding of calculus with more advanced methods, introducing partial differentiation for functions of multiple variables, as well as more advanced integral techniques to simplify complex problems.

Matrices and Vectors
A fundamental aspect of modern computing, we will define what vectors and matrices are and how one can undertake computations involving these and their special properties. We will demonstrate how large systems of equations can be formulated as matrix-vector problems, making them far easier to solve.


Differential Equations
A cornerstone of modern physics, we will learn how to identify and solve differential equations by several techniques. We will also encounter the wave equation, which underpins a great number of applications, and learn methods as to how it can be solved and understood.

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KD4008 -

Computer Programming (Core,20 Credits)

Within this module you will cover the design and development of C based code for both a standard PC and an embedded system.

The module syllabus us based but not exclusively on the following:
• Introduction of computer systems, the architecture and types from standard PCs to embedded systems,
• Code development from specifications through Pseudo code to a top-down or bottom-up based design,
• Language operators for example, if-then-else, switch-case, do-while, for,
• Data types for systems including bit length, and data pointer structures and use,
• Use of information hiding in functions, with strongly typed designs,
• File system access for a PC and for an embedded system where files may be more abstract handles,
• Controlling hardware on an embedded system for example and ADC or DAC on a microcontroller,
• The use of IO lines and interrupt structures in low level programming.

Typically the learning in the module will be based on simple case studies and example such that the above knowledge can be applied to solve a real world problem within a defined engineering context. An example of such a real-world problem would be a Traffic Light controller, or Home Burglar Alarm system.

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KD4009 -

Digital Electronics and Communications (Core,20 Credits)

The students will gain fundamental knowledge as follows:

Within the digital electronics aspect of this module the student will learn

The operation of logic gates AND,NAND,OR,NOR,XOR.
The use of truth tables and logic gates to solve combinational logic problems.
Boolean algebra and the use of Boolean algebra to simplify logic expressions prior to implementation.
The use of Karnaugh maps to simplify logic expressions prior to implementation.
Implementation of adders/subtractors using logic gates.
Using logic gates to implement S-R flip flop, J-K flip flop and D-type flip flop.
Using flip flops to develop asynchronous counters and shift registers.

Within the communication aspects of this module the student will learn

Typical types of communication techniques
Characteristics of analogue signals, their time- and frequency-domain representations
Importance of bandwidth
Characteristics of digital signals, frequency domain representation of digital signals
Evaluation of basic transmission performance in communications
Signal conversion techniques on communications
Analog and digital modulation
Encoding
Multiplexing

In addition to the gained knowledge, the students will apply this knowledge to analyse and design digital electronics circuits and communication systems. The design of analysis aspects will be targeted especially in the laboratory sessions.

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KD4010 -

Electricity, Magnetism and Electronics (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to fundamental electromagnetism, electrical circuit theory and analogue electronics. Through a combination of lectures, labs and technology-enhanced resources, you will learn to analyse basic DC and AC circuits and to familiarise with fundamental electronic components such as operational amplifiers and semiconductor diodes. This module will provide you with core knowledge, and experimental, numerical and analytical skills to tackle problems in electrical and electronic principles, thus establishing firm foundations for future employability.

Electricity and Magnetism (25%)

Electrostatics: Coulomb's law of electrostatic forces, superposition of electrostatic forces and the electric field, electric flux, Gauss’s law and its applications to calculate electric field associated with the continuous charge distributions; Concept of electric potential and its relation to the electric field; Energy stored in an electric field; Introduction to magnetostatics.

DC and AC Circuit Theory (50%)

Introduction to ideal linear elements: resistor, inductor and capacitor. Transient currents across ideal elements. Current and voltage division rule. Applications of superposition: Kirchhoff’s law.


Properties of sinusoidal and periodic waveforms, average, RMS values. Phasors and phasor diagrams, and j operator. Complex impedance, impedance diagrams.

Applications to series circuits. Power in AC circuits, power factor, apparent power, active power, and reactive power. Complex admittance and applications to parallel
circuits. An introduction to series and parallel RLC circuits.

Analogue Electronics (25%)
Introduction to the properties of an ideal operational amplifier. Simple inverting and non-inverting applications using virtual earth principles. Properties and parameters of a non-ideal op-amplifier including gain-bandwidth. Op-amplifier applications including summing, integrator and differentiator.

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KD4011 -

Fundamentals of Energy Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This is a project-oriented design-based learning module, which introduces you to the fundamental concepts of energy systems. The underlying electrical engineering, physics and mathematics is illustrated using examples from electricity generation, transmission, distribution, consumption and storage. Ficus is given to develop unique design skills over a wide range of scenarios.
Basics of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
Voltage, current, power and energy. Conservation of energy. Basic electromagnetism. Electric charge: conductors, insulators and semiconductors. Electric field. Electrostatic potential energy and potential. Magnetic field and magnetic flux density. Electromagnetic induction: Faraday’s law and Lenz’s law. Electric generator. Electric and Magnetic Circuits. Basics of electric motors and generators.

Three phase power and power electronic devices
Production of three-phase power. Phase and line voltages and currents in star and delta systems. Measurements of three-phase power. Introduction to single-phase transformer: principle, construction, referring of impedances, losses and efficiency, and equivalent circuit. Transformer Connections (Autotransformers and three-phase transformers). Overview of power electronics: Rectifiers and inverters for renewable energy integration

Power generation, energy efficiency and energy storage
Overview of conventional power generation system: gas and coal-fired power stations, combined heat and power, IGCC, nuclear power. Load curve and load factor. Fundamentals of power transmission and distribution. Load, Fundamentals of wind energy and solar energy conversion systems. Energy storage technologies

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KD4014 -

Research, Analysis and Presentation (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to gathering research data from either laboratory or reference material, analysing the acquired data in an appropriate manner and then presenting the key findings. Formal training in experimental techniques acquired in this module will support your professional and personal skills.

Research
You will learn about methods to conduct research methods based on an open-ended research question provided by the tutors. You will learn: where and how to gather information, which can be applied to generate solutions to real world problems. The ability to select from a number of research methods is important, for example, the ability to research a method to design simple laboratory tests.

Analysis
Correct use of units and symbols for physics and engineering along with the use of data analysis techniques. Specific techniques may include, for example, mean and standard deviation, simple regressive techniques, log-log and log-linear relationships, and error analysis. Simple measurement techniques may include, for example, measuring velocity, voltage, current and power. Key factors in measurement include the need to analyse the accuracy, errors, resolution and the need for calibration. You will be introduced to suitable computational packages for data analysis and processing in physics and engineering.

Presentation
You will develop key communication skills in report writing, laboratory book writing (of laboratory data), and the presentation of information both visually (via graphs and diagrams) and using text. You will develop skills in processing information, for example, highlighting key findings and drawing suitable conclusions from a piece of work, and presenting the information in both written and oral format.

Group work
Communicating and working effectively in teams is a highly sought-after skill by employers. While working in a group with other students, you will develop skills in communication and project management. You will be responsible for managing individual tasks while ensuring completion of the group tasks. You will also be introduced to tools to keep track of your professional development throughout your programme

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KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KC5002 -

Advanced Engineering Mathematics (Core,20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with two key concepts in Mathematics: Laplace Transforms and periodic functions. You will learn their use in solving ordinary differential equations arising from real world physical problems, and their use in describing the behaviour of simple control systems. The concept of the harmonic components of a periodic waveform will be introduced to you and be shown how this is useful in matching general solutions of partial differential equations to particular boundary or initial conditions. The solution of systems of linear ordinary differential equations using matrix methods will also be considered.


Outline Syllabus
Laplace Transforms: Definition, simple transforms, linearity. First shift theorem. Inverse transforms, linearity, use of the first shift theorem and partial fractions. Transforms of derivatives. Transforms of an integral. The Heaviside Unit Step function. The second shift theorem. Solution of linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients, including systems of such equations. The Delta function and the Impulse Response function; transfer function. Initial and final-value theorems. Convolution and the convolution theorem. Poles of the transfer function and stability. Steady-state response. (50%)

Periodic functions and Fourier series: Full-range and half-range series, even and odd functions and coefficients in complex form. Application to the solution of partial differential equations by the method of separation of variables. (25%)

Matrices, eigenvalues and eigenvectors: Algebraic evaluation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a matrix, application to the solution of a system of linear ordinary differential equations. (25%)

The module will be delivered using a combination of lectures and seminars. Assessment is by formal examination.

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KD5064 -

Analogue Electronics and Instrumentation (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn on module key technical content around two themes that of analogue electronics and instrumentation. These are important topics for electrical engineering covering the key basics of analogue design and the use of analogue signals used in instrumentation. Amplifiers and signal conditioning devices will be covered that convert the sensor output into usable signals for typical process control platforms. Operational amplifiers will be used extensively in the module, leading up to an understanding of discrete electronic transistor design.

Operational Amplifiers - Operational amplifier applications applied to instrumentation signals, active filter circuits, and instrumentation amplifiers. Filter considerations including magnitude and phase bode diagrams, and compensation methods.

Sensors - Temperature, strain and light sensor systems looking into devices and signals. Additional sensors considered may also include slot encoders, accelerometers and hall-effect devices.

Instrumentation - Amplifiers and signal conditioning demonstrates the ability for signal conversion and used in real world environments. Operational amplifiers will be expanded upon with the design of the instrumentation amplifier to highlight the performance improvements. Noise analysis will be introduced to show how instrumentation techniques reduce this phenomenon.

Discrete Electronics - Operational amplifiers are made from discrete elements; these building blocks will be explained include the Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJTs) and the Field Effect Transistor (FET). Transistor applications may include current sources, current sinks, and differential input stages.

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KD5065 -

C Programming and Digital Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your capabilities in the areas of digital systems, building on the hardware and software design and development techniques covered in previous related module(s).

In the Hardware Description Language (HDL) section, you learn about technology and architecture. The concept of HDL as a tool to simulate, design and document digital systems is introduced and you will learn how to design, specify, and apply digital combinational and sequential building blocks in isolation, and as part of a larger system. Then the module introduces an industry standard HDL known as Verilog, and shows how it can be used to describe, at the gate and logic expression level, digital building blocks such as decoders, multiplexers, encoders, shift registers and counters. During the course, you are given the opportunity to explore designs by means of simulation using industry standard design tools from raw Verilog code to the simulation state. You will learn how the HDL code is used for actual low-level hardware design implementation and they will also cover other practical aspects of digital hardware design, such as logic hazards, propagation delays and interfacing with other digital modules.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your Verilog code including:
1- K-map simplification
2- Timing analysis
3- Synthesizable vs non-synthesizable code
4- Finite state machine (FSM) and state diagram
5- Using built-in simulation task/function
6- IP blocks
7- Icarus Verilog
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for simulation and programming a FPGA device.

In the Programming Language section, you will learn about the architecture of microcontrollers and concept of embedded systems. ARM-based microcontroller as well as various ARM-compatible operating systems will be introduced. You will learn about different types of compilers and toolchain, and they will use the C++ language to program an ARM platform to program hardware to perform high-level tasks such as IO port access, serial connection, memory management, FSM, and string manipulation. An overview of C++ language will be given to you and advanced topics such as pointer and classes in C++ are taught. Controlling peripherals such as analogue to digital converter (ADC), digital to analogue converter (DAC), WiFi, X-Bee is introduced as well as data communication protocols such as I2C, and SPI. you will learn how to communicate with a PC application based on Python, Matlab, or LabVIEW through wired connection. The IoT technology and cloud services for microcontroller platforms are also introduced and you will become familiar with AWS and Azure.
The You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your C++ code including:
1- Debugging
2- Linter
3- QEMU
4- PlatformIO
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for simulation and programming an ARM platform.

In the PCB Design section, you will learn how to manifest your digital system concepts into an actual PCB. You will start by learning about design level and component level considerations. Then they will learn how to find appropriate component for the board and create the schematic to describe the circuit netlist. The component footprints are introduced, and you learn how to create the PCB layout and route it. Next, they are taught how to prepare your design for manufacturing and lastly what are the required post-manufacturing tasks.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your PCB design including:
1- High-speed design tips
2- Track calculation
3- EMI and EMC
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for building a schematic and PCB in software environment.

In the Code Development section, you will learn how to develop a code from a concept. You will get familiar with the concept of structured programming and code hierarchy and learn about techniques to produce clean code. Then the concepts of test code, debugging, and version control are introduced, and tips are given on how to perform code maintenance. At the end tyou will learn how to create a customised library for the digital board that they designed in PCB Design section.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your code including:
1- Flowchart
2- UML
3- Git
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for developing a library code.

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KD5066 -

Communication Systems (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about electronic communications. You will learn fundamental techniques that are used in communication systems for sending information between two devices. You will learn a number of techniques that are used in modern day communication systems to transfer information both via a physical connection such as a cable and also via a wireless connection.

Two of the key themes of electronic communications that you will study are Analogue communication and Digital communication. In both themes you will learn a number of key engineering processes that are fundamental to communications. In analogue communications you will learn the key physical and electronic processes necessary to transfer information in an analogue form. You will also explore current technologies and techniques in radio and satellite communications. In the digital communications topic, the knowledge that you learn in analogue communications will be expanded to a higher level to allow you to understand the key requirements for digital communication. We will examine how communication techniques have evolved over the years to allow users to transfer vast amounts of information at ever increasing speeds.

Three key areas within these two topics are identified:

ANALOGUE COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
Amplitude Modulation; comparison of various forms of AM, demodulation, frequency and phase insertion errors, examples and applications. Frequency modulation; NBFM, WBFM, spectra and bandwidth, examples and applications. Transmission and reception circuits. Attenuation in radio systems. Modern systems and standards.


DIGITAL COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS
Spectra of rectangular waveforms, bit rates, baud rates and relationship to bandwidth. line codes and shaping. ASK, FSK, PSK, generation and demodulation, spectrum and bandwidth. Comparison of bandwidth and power. Quadrature carrier systems. OSI reference model. Asynchronous and synchronous communications. The serial data link. Protocols. FDM and TDM multiplexing. Parity and CRC principles and implementation. Networks. IP addressing

OPTICAL SYSTEMS
Optical sources; structure, performance and frequency response. Detectors. Fibres; modes, dispersion, optimum wavelength, coupling and splicing.

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KD5067 -

Power Machine and Renewable Energy (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to the principles of operation of power systems, and enhance your knowledge of electrical machinery, power electronics and renewable energy. It will also allow you to consider the interaction between these system components.

A power network typically integrates power generators, distribution grid, transformers, transmission lines, and loads. This module provides you with an introduction to power system structure, and the principles of electrical machines. Moreover, low-carbon energy sources have increasingly contributed to the current power network, and power electronics play a key role in energy conversion. Therefore, the module also provides you with an introduction to renewable energy, and power electronics. Specifically, you will learn the following from this module:

POWER SYSTEMS (30%):
Principles and construction of single-phase transformers, equivalent circuits, efficiency and regulation, open and short circuit tests, connections of 3-phase transformers, and vector groups. Basics of powers, and power flow. Per unit systems and fundamentals of balanced fault level calculations.

ELECTRIC MACHINES (30%):
Principles and construction of DC machines, equivalent circuit, starting and speed control. Principles and construction of induction machines, expressions for speed of rotating field and slip, rotor power balance, torque-slip curve, and modern control techniques.

POWER ELECTRONICS (20%):
Fundamentals of power electronics and converters (AC-DC, DC-DC, and AC-AC etc.), and PWM control.

RENEWABLE ENERGY (20%):
Application of the knowledge of power systems, power electronics and power machines to a variety of renewable systems, such as hydro, photovoltaics, wind, combined heat and power, fuel cells, tidal and marine power plants, and illustration of their operating principles, types, characteristics and comparisons. Overview of electricity generation technologies from new and renewable energy, current contributions and future prospects. fored heat and power, fuel cells, tidal and marine power plants.

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KD5080 -

Electrical Product Development (Core,20 Credits)

This module provides you with the knowledge and skills required to research, design, implement and manage the development of an electrical/electronic product. Specifically, you will learn:
• Systems level approach to product design and development.
• The use of online databases to search for patents and research current market trends.
• Project management and the use of Gantt charts.
• Project specification development, project design, electronic/electrical and mechanical design.
• Use of simulation tools, PCB design and rapid prototyping.
• Design analysis and selection, design for manufacturing, product life cycle and product costing.
• Standards and legal issues: market and technical risk assessment, intellectual property, product end of life considerations.
• Ethical aspects, social aspects, and environmental aspects of electrical/electronic engineering product development.
• Communication skills: Pitching technical ideas to general and technical audience.
• Engineering report writing, style, citation tools and content.
• Tracking and managing your professional skill development.

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KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KL5006 -

Work placement year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

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KL5007 -

Study abroad year (Optional,120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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KL5008 -

Work placement semester (Optional,60 Credits)

This module operates within a partnership between the University, employer and yourself, and provides you with the opportunity to develop core competencies and employability skills relevant to your programme of study in a work based environment.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, within the appropriate working environments.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the placement is recognised both in your transcript as a 60 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

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KL5009 -

MPEE - Study Abroad Semester (Optional,60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one semester as part of your programme.

This is a 60 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad semester will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as an additional 60 credits for Engineering and Environment Study Abroad Semester.

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KD6010 -

Power Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to develop your knowledge, understanding and the ability to analyse the components of a modern power system. It allows you to study the components and operation of power systems, highlighting the principles, design, control, performance limits and protection from abnormal conditions. The theory, control and the properties of alternators, transmission lines, switchgear and protection will also be covered. Commercial issues surrounding the economics of power generation, electricity market and quality of supply are also explored. This module also gives you the opportunity to critically analyse and develop an understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as load flow, fault and stability studies together with methods for voltage and frequency control, including the use of modern FACTS technologies. These and other topics will be reinforced by using real-world examples and case studies, with emphasis on the use of modern technologies in power systems.

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KD6024 -

Individual Engineering Project (40 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with an opportunity to carry out an extended study in a specific area of Engineering, developing your ability to work independently and promoting self-reliance. Guidance on how to source and assess the appropriateness of information is provided to you by the module tutor.

A key aim is to encourage you to apply theoretical and analytical techniques to problem solve. The module also aims to develop both verbal and written communication skills. The project will provide practical experience of drawing up a project specification defining aims, objectives and identifying an envisaged endpoint. With the supervisor’s guidance, you will prepare a project plan that includes a Gantt chart, project background and sourcing previous work and associated theory/simulation to assess whether the aims and objectives are achievable and that your theoretical basis is sound.

To meet University requirements and gain practical experience, you must perform a risk assessment to identify potential risks/hazards associated with the project. You will follow the defined plan to complete the project that will involve the application of appropriate theory and simulations leading to the production of prototype designs.

You will be encouraged to monitor your progress based upon the project plan and complete the design cycle by testing and redesign, if necessary. A final project report and verbal/poster presentation to the supervisor, second markers and peers are required towards the end of the module. You must maintain contact with the supervisor on a regular basis to discuss/assess progress and obtain advice. As a part of developing employability skills throughout the programme, you will continue to update and record your professional development.

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KD6025 -

Design and Manufacturing Analysis (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with an analytical approach to the issues around both the design and manufacturing of electronic or electrical products. In this respect you have two clear sections, linked by an analysis approach to determine functionality within the bounds of manufacturability.

Design Analysis
• Operational amplifier construction with a view to component reduction and therefore performance degradation. Analysis is therefore required to pinpoint the performance of sub-optimal designs with suitable engineering compromises being found.
• Differential amplifier structures as applied to Instrumentation design, is explored with mathematical rigor to establish their fundamental performance limits.
• Circuit design (typically filters) with consideration of the circuit performance when non-ideal components are used.
• Other complex analysis methods are introduced including: Sensitivity analysis, Tolerance analysis, and Monticarlo analysis.

Manufacturing Analysis
1. Electronics Manufacturing Yield - the performance of electronic yield predictions, with typical examples provided from Integrated Circuit Manufacture.
2. Reliability in Electronics Manufacturing - electronic reliability under the factors of cost, performance availability
3. Waste Management in Electronic Components - green electronic issues and legislation which affect both electronic product design and
manufacturing aspects,
4. Lean Manufacturing - in manufacturing technology illustrating the philosophy of lean manufacturing

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KD6026 -

Digital Signal Processing Systems (Core,20 Credits)

This module aims to make use of the knowledge and analytic skills developed throughout the programme to design modern digital signal processing systems.

In this module you will learn:

• The fundamental concepts of discrete-time signals and systems.
• The fundamental mathematical transforms for time-domain and frequency domain representations.
• The design of digital filters; finite impulse filter and infinite impulse filter.
• The practical implementation of digital filters in simulation and hardware.

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KD6027 -

Embedded Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn the architecture, and how to program a high performance microcontroller - ARM cortex series. You will learn how to apply the mathematical, natural science and engineering principles and knowledge in electrical and electronic engineering in an integrated approach to solve the problem of embedded systems with link to real world problems, by using the recent embedded hardware and software technologies. You will also learn how to critically analyse the performance of the embedded systems to verify if a given performance requirement and specification is met, with comprehensive consideration of safety environmental and commercial matters. You will learn how to write a technical report on complex engineering matters with critical evaluation of the performance of the embedded system you design.

Specifically this will include:
- A consideration of the relative merits of a number of commercially available microcontrollers
- Embedded software engineering and lifecyle of embedded system development
- Flowchart for embedded software system design
- A detailed investigation of the ARM cortex series of microcontrollers, including architecture, peripherals and capabilities.
- Using ARM IDE development tools to compose, compile and fault find programs written in a high level programming language ('C').
- Features of the ARM microcontroller that will be considered are:
- Clock generation - internal/external
- GPIO - general purpose input/output
- ADC - analogue to digital converter
- USART, SPI, I2C - serial communications
- Timers
- Interrupt capability

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KD6028 -

Digital System Design and Implementation (Optional,20 Credits)

The module aims to show you how to design and implement digital systems using a range of powerful techniques and tools, such as Finite State Machines (FSMs) and Programmable Logic. A central theme of the module is the use of a Hardware Description Language (HDL), and how it can be used to describe and verify a digital design at a behavioural level. Practical sessions, involving the use of industry standard simulation, synthesis, and implementation software, will be used to provide experience of the complete digital system design flow, from concept to realisation. In addition to the use of HDLs, this module also considers some of the key low-level aspects of digital systems, including Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) circuits and their performance and optimisation using circuit-level simulation.

This module also aims to develop your understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as testing and ‘Design-for-Test’. These and other topics will be reinforced using real-world case examples and designs.

The commercial issues surrounding digital system realisation using a variety of technologies will be explored, with emphasis on Programmable Logic. The design of FSMs is methodically introduced, and synchronous and asynchronous FSMs are covered. The Petri Net is also introduced and used to create both sequential and parallel based FSMs. All these FSM methods are used to synthesise digital systems to meet required specifications.

This module will provide you with the skills you require to practice digital system design in an industrial context, making use of real-world design problems and industry standard software. Case studies, based on industrial consultancy work carried out by academic staff, will be used as examples to enhance your employability.

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KD6029 -

Wireless and RF Systems Design (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your skills in electronic communications with specific reference to key techniques that are used in radio frequency (RF) communications. You will be exposed to the theory, design and analysis of all key aspects of RF and wireless communication systems.

All wireless communication systems consists of two key areas, namely high frequency circuit design and antenna design. Within high frequency circuit design
you will learn how to modify the performance of RF signals and will cover the key concepts of microwave circuit design for wireless and RF systems. Once the RF signal has been generated, it must then be converted to a signal that can be transmitted through air. This is the second key concept and will be covered in the second part of the module – namely antenna design and propagation. The antenna design section covers the key principles of transmitting an RF signal through free space. The antenna design topic also examines the key concepts of antenna design related to modern communication systems, including mobile telephone systems from 1G to 5G. A further key part of any mobile communication device is the interaction between circuit design and antenna design and will also be covered in this module.


For Microwave circuit design typical topics include: Transmission Line Basics, Smith Chart, Impedance Matching techniques, Lumped Elements, Impedance / Admittance parameters, ABCD parameters , S-parameters, Passive microwave circuits.

For Antenna design typical topics include: Basic antenna parameters, outline of antenna types, wires, apertures, dishes, patch antennas, antennas required for
mobile systems, Structure of Cellular systems. Base station design, Typical RF transmitter layout, Antenna types for mobile handset and base stations. Factors affecting reception.

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KD6030 -

Optical Communications System Design (Optional,20 Credits)

The module will provide the knowledge and skills for you in two key themes of optical fibre and optical wireless communications. These are essential topics in electrical and electronics engineering programme that cover the fundamentals and advanced optical system designs in both fibre and wireless systems. Optical fibre communications provides the backbone for long-haul and medium range telecommunications that offers ultrahigh data transmission capacity whereas optical wireless communications is an emerging technology that enables data transmission via light, either in infrared or visible light band using laser and/or light emitting diode (LED) for indoor and short range communications system.

Through the module syllabus you will learn:

Fundamental optical fibre/wireless communications includes
- Introduction to the optical wire/wireless communications system and the overall design
- Identification of system elements, subsystems and required specifications
- Optical transmitter design, optical propagation channel, effect on the optical fibre, effect on the optical wireless channel, noise and losses, optical receiver design.

System design includes: multiple access techniques, system design and performance evaluation, analysis of the practical and industrial optical communications system

More information

KD6031 -

Instrumentation and Control of Dynamical Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module shows you how to use modern control design techniques based on state-space differential equations governing a dynamical system. You will also cover instrumentation techniques that are required for practical implementation of control algorithms. Upon completion of the module, you will be able to design instrumentation and control systems; implement and evaluate them using relevant software packages. There are two main themes:
Control:
• Conventional and modern control design and analysis
• Description of dynamic control systems using differential equations, transfer functions, and state-space representation.
• Control system analysis, including dynamic responses of systems, stability and controllability of systems.
• Control system design, including design via open- and closed-loop systems, state and output feedback controls
• Analysis and design of digital systems.
• Use of software packages for simulation of control systems.
Instrumentation:
• Range, span, nonlinearity, hysteresis, resolution, ageing effects.
• Dynamic modelling of sensors using transfer functions and state-space methods.
• Signal conditioning: loading effects, bridge circuits, correction of non-linearity, effects of feedback, amplifier limitations.
• Noise and interference in instrumentation systems and estimation of errors.
• Signal recovery from noise interference.
• Computerised data acquisition systems including ADCs and a range of modern instrumentation protocols.
• Use software packages for simulation of instrumentation systems.

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KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KL6068 -

Satellite Systems and Space Environment (Optional,20 Credits)

The module provides students with skills and knowledge to develop scientific and/or electronic systems for space applications. The topics covered are:

The space environment - launch, orbits, rocket equation, drag, radiation, vacuum, thermal gradients.

Satellite systems and system development for space applications - radio communication, ground stations and link budgets, solar power, data processing, Earth observation, optimisation of systems for space, materials choice for space, component characteristics, mechanical and thermal testing.

Product Acceptance and Qualification Assurance for space – industry standards for space-worthy design, functional testing, simulation of operations, verification and validation processes.

Environmental Testing – theory and practice of vibration testing, resonant sweeps, shock tests and random noise tests. Theory and practice of thermal vacuum testing, the effect of vacuum on electronics and thermal cycling. Theory and practice of radiation testing, how radiation effects electronics, how to design to be radiation tolerant, and testing components in the x-ray irradiator.

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KL6069 -

Smart Energy System (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a lab-based group project to develop more design and practical skills for a final year of an undergraduate degree programme in electrical and electronic discipline. You will learn a wide range of extensive knowledge of electronic engineering subjects through undertaking the project, including on the microprocessor-based control system, internet of things (IoT), power conversion, and battery energy storage. You will be motivated to explore problems in real-world applications of electronics and address challenges using the developed skills.

This module will build on the skills acquired through previous study and gain some new knowledge to extend the practical experience of the students into the following areas:

• IoT cloud - based structure using microprocessors
• Modelling, Design and control of simple power DC-DC converter
• Battery charging/discharging and management techniques (e.g. state-of-charge and state-of-health estimation)
• Solar electric power generation
• Maximum power point tracking techniques
• DC motor drive and control
• Advanced programming

More information

KC7047 -

Applied Engineering Statistics (Core,20 Credits)

In this module, you will develop and apply the statistical techniques required for the analysis and modelling of engineering systems.

In the first half of the Semester the module is delivered through a series of lectures, with accompanying seminars, on requisite material, followed in the second half by assessed independent and group work associated with two case studies, assessed either by a PowerPoint or poster presentation.

You will receive on-going formative feedback during seminars in the first half of the semester, with both written and verbal feedback of their assessed work in the second half.

The two statistical modelling case studies will focus on regression analysis and time series, which are commonly required in engineering disciplines.

Outline Syllabus
Mathematical modelling
Modelling techniques, development, appraisal and modification. (20%)

Statistical methods
Generalised linear and non linear models. Curvilinear and non linear regression models. Analysis of variance and linear logistic model. Testing of model suitability. (40%)

Operational research and time series
Time series characteristics. Trends, moving averages and stationarity. Autocorrelation and tests of randomness. Queuing theory and its application. (40%)

Use of appropriate statistical software (e.g. R).

More information

KD7011 -

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will consider the current practices and technological advances in the design, control, mathematical modelling, and performance optimisation of modern Wind Energy Conversion Systems. You will apply the necessary knowledge and gain understanding of the main concepts, methodologies, and future developments in this field. The module syllabus includes, but is not limited to, the following topics: wind energy resource; operating principles, characteristics and types of wind turbines; commercial and emerging distributed wind generators; power electronic converter topologies for variable speed systems; turbine aero-dynamics; grid-connected and stand-alone applications; research and development aspects; environmental and social context and issues; regulations and standards; economics, employment opportunities etc.

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KD7019 -

Advanced Embedded System Design Technology (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will cover the broad topic of Microprocessors and Microcontrollers and how they are used in Embedded Systems. This will involve investigating processor architectures, operating modes and interfacing to peripherals. Examples of structures from current industrial vendors such as ATMEL, ARM, and Microchip will be explored and examined. You will consider the hardware design and development of embedded microcontroller systems, including implementations for controlling both internal and external interfaces and peripherals. Careful examination of Real-Time control issues, interrupts and microcontroller interactions will be analysed. This will allow you to be able to design the necessary hardware for microcontroller-based systems to meet a client’s specification.

To support the implementation of hardware designs software development of Embedded Microcontroller Systems will be employed looking at both low level assembly language/machine code programming through to C programming. The techniques employed will cover code generation procedures, structured programming techniques, reusable library functions and top down/bottom up programming methods.
All these techniques will be applied case studies based upon industrial research activities. Typical applications include:

These will cover areas such as temperature monitoring, algorithmic techniques; message passing systems and communication protocols.

Microcontroller technology has a broad range of applications within industry and research environments. Employing the use of a sophisticated ARM module exposes students to the diverse implementations, of such modules, and provides the key technical skills required by industry essential to modern digital and communication systems.

More information

KD7020 -

Digital Design Automation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your capabilities in the areas of digital systems by means of high-level languages including C/C++ and Python.

The module starts by introducing digital system design and an overview of HDL tools. The concept of HLS and its application in high-level engineering design problems are then introduced, and several comparisons are carried out to highlight the difference and benefits of HLS. C/C++ programming language is presented as the HLS tool and you are given an overview of different data types, arrays, loops, and conditions in C/C++. You will learn the implementation of both sequential and combinational circuits in HLS as well as the concept of testbench and will learn how to apply the concept of testbench to real-world problems and how to simulate the real devices and digital components in your testbench. Through examples, you also will learn about FSM and design hierarchy and the benefit of clean code in a project. The HLS section then continues with the topic of parallelism, IP, and synthesis and concludes by looking at other methods of programming FPGA including SystemC, OpenCL, LabVIEW, and Matlab.
You will also cover techniques and tools that help you with developing your HLS code including:
1- Simulation
2- Debugging
3- FSM design tool
4- C/C++ standard library
This part of the module comes with a set of workshops specifically arranged to teach you how to use designated tools for simulation and programming a FPGA device using C/C++.

Another section of the module is devoted to programming FPGA using Python language also known as Pynq technology. You will start by understanding SoC and Xilinx Zynq family architectures. Then you will learn the fundamental requirements of Python for FPGA programming such as commonly used keywords and package management. The structure of Pynq is covered and implementing Python code in Jupyter is then explained through several examples and you learn how to apply your acquired knowledge to real world problems. You then will be briefly introduced to topics including digital signal processing (DSP), artificial intelligence (AL), machine learning (ML), software defined radio (SDR), and their common and cutting-edge applications in daily life and industry. The section concludes with looking at concept of embedded ARM cores in FPGA and running operating system (OS) on SoC.

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KD7047 -

Photovoltaic Cell and Module Technology (Optional,20 Credits)

The module delivers four main themes of theoretical and technical content related to solar cell devices and modules within the field of Solar photovoltaics.
You will consider themes that include an introduction to the characteristics of the Sun that are relevant to solar cell operation. The solar spectrum and its intensity and total energy available from the sun, will be presented. Relevant semiconductor physics together with important semiconductor materials used in solar cells will be introduced. Underpinning quantum theory, required to understand energy bandgap, direct and indirect transitions and the electrical and optical behaviour of these materials, will also be reviewed.

Important processes used for the production of semiconductor materials and solar cells will be introduced together with ideal solar cell devices based on the p-n junction. Processes used to produce crystalline silicon as well as the other semiconductor materials and device component layers as well as techniques for controlling the electrical and device behaviour, will be presented.

Ideal behaviour of the junction will be considered under equilibrium conditions and the electrical behaviour derived. This will be extended to consider the behaviour when operating as a solar cell under illumination to include key performance parameters such as the open circuit current, short circuit current and cell conversion efficiency.

The module will proceed to introduce factors that affect solar cell behaviour under non-ideal conditions. The influence of temperature and the quality of electrical contacts on device performance will be examined. Finally, an overview of device characterisation techniques, module design and applications of photovoltaic devices will be presented.

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KD7049 -

Photovoltaic Development and Implementation (Optional,20 Credits)

This module considers the development of photovoltaic technology, in terms of photovoltaic cell design and manufacturing advances, the progress in economic and
environmental aspects and the definition and use of policy measures to aid market development. You will develop a wide range of skills from the understanding of
research directions and how these can lead to improvement of cell and system performance to the ability to conduct economic and environmental assessments of current and
new technologies. This wide range of subjects will equip the student to contribute to the development of photovoltaics as it becomes a mainstream energy source worldwide.
An overview of the subjects to be studied is provided below:

• Advanced photovoltaic cell design (high efficiency approaches, multijunction concepts, material reduction strategies, organic and polymer cells)
• Advanced characterisation methods (methods to determine the detailed performance of advanced cell concepts)
• Economic analysis methods (economic theory, production economics, financing mechanisms)
• Environmental impact assessment (process definition, hazard assessment, embodied energy and emissions analysis)
• Policy issues (market development, climate change and security aspects, government policies and market development approaches)

More information

KD7050 -

Photovoltaic System Technology (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module, you will learn about the principles of photovoltaic (PV) system, design, operation and application. This will include consideration of the system components and the design and configuration of the solar array, together with examples of stand-alone, grid-connected and space applications. The module will also help you to appreciate the critical issues relating to the implementation of photovoltaic systems.

The topics within the module syllabus include:
• PV arrays and system components
• Grid connected PV systems, including large scale and building integrated systems
• Stand-alone PV systems and applications
• Concentrator PV systems
• PV arrays for satellite power supply
• Monitoring and performance analysis
• Operation and maintenance, system lifetime, standards and regulations

More information

KD7051 -

Interdisciplinary Team Engineering Project (40 Credits)

This module provides you with the opportunity to take an integrated approach to the application of both your specialist and non-specialist knowledge and skills within an industrial or research-based project. You will work in a team around a substantial interdisciplinary (e.g. electrical, mechanical and control engineering, physicists, chemists) project involving the development of a product, from concept to design and fabrication through to critical evaluation and redesign.
This project will provide you with enhanced preparation for professional practice with diversity and inclusion within the workplace, as well as integrate technical expertise, reflecting on the security implications and mitigations, with business, commercial, ethical and social concerns. You will also have the opportunity to experience working across engineering/sciences disciplines, while developing team leadership attributes.

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KD7063 -

Wireless Communication Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to introduce you to the concepts, structure and organisation of wireless communications from a system point of view, thus illustrating the theoretical concepts and their application in practical scenarios. Wireless communication systems including the old analogue as well all digital technologies based on the optical and radio frequencies will be introduced. In addition, you will learn about the fundamental theoretical concepts for both radio and optical based wireless communications.

The module syllabus:

• Communication Regulation: Regulating authorities; standards organisation; frequency spectrum, and power usage.

• Radio Communication: System and subsystem specifications for radio based communication including antennas and propagation mechanisms; cellular wireless systems, traffic engineering; noise and interference; noise factor and cascaded systems; wireless channel; link budget calculations; frequency re-use; GSM; multi-path propagation.

• Optical Wireless Communications: Including the concept of indoor optical wireless systems; diffused and line of sight links; optical channel characteristics; noise sources; and optical path link budgets.

• Digital Communication: M-ary modulation and demodulation; coherent and non-coherent systems; signalling space and constellation diagrams; BER performance of different modulation formats; matched filter detection.

• Multiplexing and Multiple Access: TDM, FDM, TDMLA, FDMA and CDMA.

The syllabus will allow you to understand and pursue careers of communication system design and deployment within the telecommunications industry. This module together with other modules such as the high level system design and high level digital / analogue circuit design will give you the skills and expertise required within the telecommunications and computer network industries, as well as preparing you to do further studies in the this and relevant fields.

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KD7064 -

Optical Communications System (Optional,20 Credits)

The module will provide you with the knowledge and skills in system design around two key themes of optical fibre and optical wireless communications. These are essential topics for modern telecommunications and cover advanced optical system designs as well as including industrial standards in both fibre and wireless systems. Optical fibre communications provides the backbone long-haul and medium range telecommunications that offers ultrahigh data transmission capacity whereas optical wireless communications is an emerging technology. This technology enables data transmission, either in the infrared or visible light bands, employing lasers or light emitting diodes (LED) for indoor and short range communications system.

The module syllabus covers the technical analysis of optical fibre and wireless communications both at a system and sub-system level. Performance calculations and design considerations are covered, specifically in the areas of optical transmitters and receivers, Careful examination of performance limiters will be defined and methods to offset them will be explored and analysed for optimum design. These limiters include such effects as modulation, noise, dispersion, modal transmission, multipath effects, diffusion, fog, turbulence, smoke etc.

System performance is developed and explored to maximise the capability of a communication channel covering such aspects as link budgets, multiplexing techniques, BER analysis etc. allowing the performance criteria being characterised to meet a system specification

With these developed skills and knowledge you will be able to undertake the design and analysis of a complex optical communication system, making judicial choices and improvements.

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KD7066 -

Analogue Electronic Design (Optional,20 Credits)

Within this module you will learn some of the key design and development skills needed for analogue electronics. The module will run through a number of fundamental building blocks of circuit design to enable you to design and develop from a high level abstraction in circuit design. The module supports this learning though the use of specific tools mixed in with key design theory along with practical lab based skills for the development and design of analogue circuitry using optimisation techniques.

Computer Aided Design (CAD)
Experimentation based on the use and application of an industry standard CAD package (for example, OrCAD or Mentor Graphics). Use of CAD tools to experiment with a number of circuit structures to derive their function and application inside of an abstract CAD environment.
Components, Bipolar device operation and modelling in association with passive components. The design needs for the layout of components, including some of the key parameters needed for modelling inside a CAD environment.

Analogue Design
Design of fundamental analogue cell structures, including switches, active resistors, current sources and current sinks. The design of current mirrors from basic to more advanced supply voltage independent mirrors, and voltage and current references. Integrated circuit level design of the building blocks of communications, for example, low noise amplifiers, mixers, phase locked loops and oscillators.

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KD7068 -

Renewable Energy Technologies for Electricity Supply (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides you with the opportunity to study the operation of the renewable energy technologies used for electricity generation, covering the aspects of resource assessment, operating characteristics, typical performance levels, economics, and environmental impact. You will also consider the context of the use of renewable energy systems, including aspects relating to power electronics techniques with grid connection and enabling technologies in power processing and energy storage.

The module introduces you to all the renewable technologies that can be used to generate electricity, including solar, water, wind, geothermal and biomass technologies. In addition, other type of renewable energy generation, power conversion and control techniques as well as energy storage technologies associated with the smart grids (e.g. electrical vehicles, power to hydrogen technologies etc) will be covered in this course module.

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KD7069 -

Power Electronics and Drive Systems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with thorough understanding and knowledge of existing and new concepts and technologies in electrical power engineering, and apply the knowledges on design and industrial applications of power electronics and electric motor drives. You will cover the principles of advanced control techniques as applied to these systems. The module is specifically concerned with the following subjects: power electronics devices and conventional converter topologies; pulse-width-modulation (PWM) techniques; state of the art practical switching power converters; power quality and harmonic analysis of various power conversion systems; power electronics control of renewable energy sources including solar, wind, and fuel-cell energy systems as well as electric and hybrid vehicles; electric machines and drives fundamentals; space-vector theory, control and applications of DC and AC drives; vector and field-oriented control of high performance induction and synchronous motor drives; applications and efficiency of electric drives; regulations, standards and other professional issues.

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KD7070 -

Smart Grids (Optional,20 Credits)

This module aims to deepen your understanding and ability to study existing electrical power distribution networks and to consider new concepts and technologies for future ‘smart grid’ power networks. Emphasis will be given to the integration of renewable energy resources, electric vehicles, enabling technologies and the quality of supply. The module also covers advanced power electronics controllers and ICT techniques as applied to the smart grid.

This module also gives you the opportunity to critically analyse and develop an understanding of practical design and implementation issues, such as, quality of supply, cost considerations, regulations and standards. It explores the role of the built environment in the whole energy system, with a focus on the integration of renewables, demand response and static/ mobile energy storage. You will develop skills in modelling, and the visualisation and discussion of results, through applying your knowledge to develop techno-economic models of case studies.

Topics covered will be reinforced by the use of real-world examples and case studies. Published papers and simulation will be uploaded in elp and it can provide a good experience for students to see where the proposed algorithms/ methods will be applied.

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KL5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Mathematics, Physics and Electrical Engineering (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KL7022 -

Engineering Technology Management (Core,20 Credits)

In this module students will learn about Strategic Management, Project Management including Project Definition and its links to Project Success through the Management of Risk as well as Planning and Control of projects. Students will learn about management techniques and professional issues associated with relevant industry and society. They will enhance their critical reflection, analysis and other transferable skills which will aid their studies and support their career progression after graduating.

In addition, students will consider the role of ethics in delivering a Business Strategy and in their role as a manager. The Learning and Teaching strategy will engage students with lectures and online resources, much guided and independent reading about theory and practice as well as seminars where they will develop and improve their abilities and skills through reflection, discussion, and argument. The assessment will seek to move students from passive gatherers of knowledge to active participants in management decision making. Through the process they will refine and improve their own approaches to solving management problems in the subject disciplines. Students are required to critically analyse the management environment and to propose solution based on the module theory.

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KL7023 -

Smart Microsystems (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a background in microengineering in general and Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) in particular. This module will build on the skills acquired through previous study and gain some new knowledge to extend the experience of the students into the following areas:

• Micromachining and microfabrication techniques,
• Thin-film processes, photolithography, deposition and etching techniques for microsystems fabrication,
• Analytical and finite-element method-based analysis of microsystems,
• Transduction mechanisms,
• Design and analysis of micromachined sensors and actuators.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

MEng (Hons) Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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All information is accurate at the time of sharing.

Full time Courses starting in 2023 are primarily delivered via on-campus face to face learning but may include elements of online learning. We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with additional restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors, potentially to a full online offer, should further restrictions be deemed necessary in future. Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

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