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This course is suitable for individuals at the start of their careers as English Language teachers, and also for more experienced teachers who are looking to develop further professionally.

Offering a comprehensive overview and critique of the key concepts, theories, and perspectives that underpin language teaching, it provides an opportunity for course participants to reflect on the relationship between these ideas and language teaching in their own professional context. The course thus focuses on both classroom practice and on broader aspects of the profession such as syllabus and materials design, programme development, and teacher education. You will acquire the knowledge and skills required to reflect critically both upon your own language teaching practice and the wider TESOL profession.

Whichever pathway you follow, you will develop a critical professional perspective towards TESOL, drawing on a range of theoretical frameworks in Applied Linguistics to better understand the global, cultural, political and educational contexts in which English is taught.

Course Information

Level of Study
Postgraduate

Mode of Study
1 year full-time
1 other options available

Department
Humanities

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2024

Fee Information

Module Information

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Entry Requirements 2024/25

Standard Entry

Applicants should normally have:

A minimum of a 2:2 honours degree, or equivalent.

If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English language requirements:

International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

 *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS.  You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2024/25 Entry

Full UK Fee: £9,250

Full EU Fee: £18,250

Full International Fee: £18,250



Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK, EU and International scholarship, fees, and funding information.

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

If you’d like to receive the latest updates from Northumbria about our courses, events, finance & funding then enter your details below.

* At Northumbria we are strongly committed to protecting the privacy of personal data. To view the University’s Privacy Notice please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EL6029 -

World Englishes (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will examine the role of English in the world today, as you learn about the development of English as a world language and also as a language which has many global and local varieties.

You will develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the historical, social and political contexts of the global expansion and development of English and Englishes, and will explore types of variation across Englishes (variation across time, places and spaces). You will examine the emergence of new standard Englishes, and further develop your understanding of the debates surrounding standard language ideology. You will also explore the internationalisation and globalisation of English, examining the ways in which English is ‘marketed’ as the language of opportunity, but also acts as a ‘gatekeeper’ in our contemporary globalized world. You will examine the role of world Englishes in language death, and discuss possible future scenarios for new and world Englishes.

Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied perspectives about English which you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint in speech and in writing – a key employability skill.

More information

EL6032 -

Variation, Change and Corpus Linguistics (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module, you will learn how to use recently developed corpora of written or spoken language to investigate patterns of grammatical variation and/or change. You will learn what a corpus is, and the research skills necessary to use it. These skills including how to identify research questions and hypotheses, how to select research methods appropriate to particular hypotheses (including qualitative and quantitative approaches to corpus data), how to select and evaluate appropriate sources of corpus data, how to extract relevant data from the corpus to test a research hypothesis, and how to interpret those data in the light of theories of language variation and change. Through the practical experience of using corpora you will gain on this module, you will learn about the issues involved in conducting this kind of research, so that you will be able to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of particular research techniques, methods or strategies that are applied within corpus studies of language variation and change Not only will this enable you to see how research in this field is conducted, it will provide you with opportunities to develop key transferable skills in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of large datasets, the interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data (particularly quantitative reasoning skills), the use of computerised databases and tools for statistical analysis, and the presentation of research data and analysis both verbally and in writing. Working in small groups will enhance your abilities to collaborate with others, to justify and take decisions, to manage a research project and to work independently.

More information

EL6058 -

Language, Meaning and the Mind (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a detailed overview of the key concepts and issues in semantics (the study of language meaning). Along the way, we will discover a range of tools for analysing language and we will be engaging with current debates in linguistic theory. The module takes a problem-solving, interactive approach to analysing meaning and is designed to develop your ability to discover patterns (and exceptions) in language data.

More information

EL7005 -

Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

The module will give you the opportunity to complete either an independent research project of your choice on a topic in English language, linguistics or TESOL, or a practice-based project.

You will be working under the supervision of at least one member of staff either to plan, undertake and write up a small research project, or to reflect on your experience during a teacher-training course. You will learn how to plan, manage and organise a relatively large scale research or practice-based project. To successfully carry out your project, you will need to draw on skills and knowledge acquired during your programme. Throughout your dissertation project, you will learn how to identify interesting research questions and how to apply different data collection and analysis techniques to answer these questions.

The module will equip you with transferrable skills that are highly valued by employers including management, organisational and analytical skills.

You will be required to submit 3 formative assessments totalling 4,000 words (a research proposal, a critical bibliography and a research timeline/plan), and a 12,000 word final dissertation. As well as individual tutorials with your supervisor(s), there will be four two-hour research lectures to support you in your work.

More information

EL7038 -

Research Methods (Core,20 Credits)

This 20-credit module aims to provide students, whether they regard themselves as predominantly practitioners or researchers, with the conceptual and analytical tools necessary to conduct informed and responsible enquiry in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, including language education. You will develop your knowledge and understanding of a range of research methods in these related fields. You will extend your ability to critically evaluate empirical research articles, including the suitability of different research approaches, instruments and methods of analysis to address the research questions/hypotheses developed.

On successful completion, you will be able to: reflect critically on the research methods used in existing Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and language education research; construct an appropriate research design for any given research question and/or hypothesis; select and undertake appropriate methods of data collection and analysis (including introductory descriptive and inferential statistical analysis); and accurately report research outcomes.

You will thus explore and undertake both quantitative and qualitative data collection and data analysis (through SPSS and NVivo), focusing on: developing clear and addressable research questions/hypotheses; research ethics; experimental design; and researching with language/textual data, including with corpora. The module will also investigate the use of specific research instruments such as questionnaires and other survey scales, focus groups and interviews as well as observation, self-report and introspection measures.

On completion, students will be ready to conduct informed research at postgraduate level in the fields of Linguistics and/or Applied Linguistics and, as such, the module will help you prepare for your subsequent Masters’ dissertation.

More information

EL7040 -

Sociolinguistics (Optional,20 Credits)

This 20-credit module will develop your awareness and understanding of the field of Sociolinguistics, the interface between language and society. You will analyse critically, by means of lecture input and seminar discussion, the main research themes in the field. As such, you will pay particular attention to a range of important specialist theories within Sociolinguistics and evaluate historical, contemporary and emerging empirical research investigating the social meaning of linguistic variation.

You will study a number of key topics: social and regional linguistic variation and change in the UK and beyond; language and identity; language attitudes and ideologies; the social and linguistic factors which drive language variation and change; stylistic variation in language use; multilingualism; discourse and pragmatic variation; and quantitative and qualitative approaches to sociolinguistic study. Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied socio-psychological and contextual perspectives regarding the role of language and society which you encounter and establish your own view of and position within contemporary debates within the field, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint, both in speech and in writing.

More information

EL7041 -

Negotiated Study (Optional,20 Credits)

This module enables students to negotiate a programme of work with a supervisor to investigate a field of interest that is not catered for by other postgraduate modules. The teaching will comprise six half-hour tutorials with a supervisor, but students are expected to undertake the major portion of the semester's study on their own. Where more than one student is interested in a particular field, some classes may be held in lieu of tutorials. The content, level of achievement required, and total workload will be comparable with those of other postgraduate modules in the programme, although the balance of taught and independent work may be adjusted to allow for lower teaching contact hours.

The MA Programme Leader will be informed throughout the process of syllabus development, this overview ensuring the area or topic in is not covered elsewhere in the core or option modules, and that there is no repetition of content for the student(s).

Like all other MA modules, assessment will be a combination of either theoretical essay, language description and analysis or other appropriate work totalling the equivalent of 4,000 words. Topics and titles will be negotiated by the supervisor and student(s).

More information

EL7047 -

Investigating Language for TESOL (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with a range of descriptive, critical, and analytical tools that will enable you to examine the English language. You will acquire the skills required for analysing key aspects of language. You will also be equipped with the necessary skills for examining the relationship between language and meaning in a range of contexts. The module highlights phenomena which present difficulties for learners of a second or foreign language and shows how a detailed understanding of language in context, using linguistic data from a range of sources, such as narrative, classroom discourse, figurative language, and corpora, can be used as an effective tool in the teaching and learning of English as another language. You will also engage with current debates in linguistic theory and applied linguistics develop the skills necessary for discovering patterns in language theory and data.

More information

EL7048 -

TESOL Syllabus & Materials Design (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the principles of both TESOL materials and syllabus design, and give you practical experience of developing materials and courses for TESOL students. The experience that you gain through participating in the course and completing the assignments will be of both practical and theoretical use for career development, through further training and potential employment in the TESOL field. You will consider a variety of learning materials and course designs, tying these in with pedagogic and methodological approaches. You will also look at how courses and materials have developed historically, and how linguistic and pedagogic elements are accounted for. Throughout the module, you will be encouraged to develop a working knowledge of the principles behind designing classroom materials and course syllabuses, and a critical stance towards the examples presented to you. You will also develop the skills necessary to design and critically evaluate a set of language learning materials, and a short course for TESOL learners.

More information

EL7049 -

Professional Practice of TESOL (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to current TESOL methodology, trace its development and map its possible future. You will be exposed to current debates in the TESOL profession including issues around the use of native and non-native English teachers. The module also has practicum sessions which require you put theory into practice. The experience that you gain will be of both intellectual and practical value for career development and your potential employment in the TESOL field.

The areas of grammar, pronunciation and lexis, receptive and productive skills and lesson planning will also be considered. You will gain wide ranging experience in planning appropriate lessons and delivering them during the practicum sessions. You will also learn through observing others in practice as well as gain useful feedback from your classmates.

Through engaging in the module, you will be expected to develop, 1) familiarity with a variety of methods and approaches, 2) awareness of appropriate methodology for delivering language lessons, 3) practical skill in using appropriate methodology in the delivery of lessons.

At the end of this module, you will 1) have further experience of TESOL methodology, 2) be able to take a critical stance with regard to classroom practice, 3) have experience of planning and delivering appropriate lessons, and be able to justify the pedagogical choices made.

More information

EL7050 -

Investigating Second Language Acquisition (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will critically analyse and review changes in theoretical perspectives of second language acquisition, and consider empirical research designed to test these theories. You will trace development of second language acquisition theory as well as considering more recent theoretical developments looking at models which include Contrastive Analysis, Interlanguage theories, Universal Grammar, Cognitive models and the roles of input, interaction and output. You will also consider the impact of individual differences on second language learning success, including a focus on cognitive and affective factors. The intention is that you will develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between theory, data, and practice and encourage critical reflection.

More information

EL7051 -

Exploring the TESOL Classroom (Core,20 Credits)

Drawing upon an Applied Linguistics perspective, this 20-credit module explores the Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)/English Language Teaching (ELT), and language teaching and learning more generally, looking specifically at ‘what takes place’ in the second language classroom. It investigates the key questions and dilemmas around classroom practice, focusing on the implications of these debates for ELT practitioners and for how they/we teach.

On this module, therefore, you will engage critically with current key debates in second language pedagogy, linking your own teaching and learning experiences to theory and the research literature. Areas examined include classroom interaction and management, language teaching methods and the emergence of a Postmethod era within ELT, and the attributes and attitudes which learners bring to the language learning classroom. Throughout, students’ own (and differing) social and institutional contexts for English language teaching/learning will be recognised.

You will thus reflect critically upon social and historical trends within applied linguistics and English language teaching, recognising the complexity and diversity of ELT classrooms around the world, establishing your own ‘sense of plausibility’ about pedagogic practice and theory in relation to your own (current or future) professional context.

Your studies during this wide-ranging module may also help you identify aspects of the language learning classroom which you find particularly interesting. This may form a basis for studying them further during your MA dissertation.

More information

EL7052 -

TESOL in the World (Core,20 Credits)

Drawing upon an Applied Linguistics perspective, this 20-credit module explores key issues and debates in the TESOL field. It investigates key questions and dilemmas around TESOL within educational, technological, economic, linguistic, sociocultural, and historical/political contextual frameworks, focusing on the implications of these debates for ELT stakeholders.

On this module, therefore, you will engage critically with current key debates which would include topics such as (1) World Englishes (2) Innovation and creativity in the TESOL classroom (technology and other options like the flipped classroom, using drama, art, etc.); (3) Culture, Intercultural communication and TESOL; (4) Literacy and TESOL (EAL and ESOL) ; (5) TESOL for Young learners; (6) Bilingualism, multilingualism including the role of L1; and (7) Instructed SLA.

You will thus reflect critically upon social and historical trends within applied linguistics and English language teaching, recognising the complexity and diversity of ELT classrooms around the world, establishing your own ‘sense of plausibility’ about pedagogic practice and theory in relation to your own (current or future) professional context.

Your studies during this wide-ranging module may also help you identify aspects of the language learning classroom which you find particularly interesting. This may form a basis for studying them further during your MA dissertation.

More information

YC7000 -

Academic Language Skills for Social Sciences & Humanities (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

EL6029 -

World Englishes (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will examine the role of English in the world today, as you learn about the development of English as a world language and also as a language which has many global and local varieties.

You will develop your knowledge and critical understanding of the historical, social and political contexts of the global expansion and development of English and Englishes, and will explore types of variation across Englishes (variation across time, places and spaces). You will examine the emergence of new standard Englishes, and further develop your understanding of the debates surrounding standard language ideology. You will also explore the internationalisation and globalisation of English, examining the ways in which English is ‘marketed’ as the language of opportunity, but also acts as a ‘gatekeeper’ in our contemporary globalized world. You will examine the role of world Englishes in language death, and discuss possible future scenarios for new and world Englishes.

Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied perspectives about English which you encounter, and establish your own view of and position within these debates, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint in speech and in writing – a key employability skill.

More information

EL6032 -

Variation, Change and Corpus Linguistics (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module, you will learn how to use recently developed corpora of written or spoken language to investigate patterns of grammatical variation and/or change. You will learn what a corpus is, and the research skills necessary to use it. These skills including how to identify research questions and hypotheses, how to select research methods appropriate to particular hypotheses (including qualitative and quantitative approaches to corpus data), how to select and evaluate appropriate sources of corpus data, how to extract relevant data from the corpus to test a research hypothesis, and how to interpret those data in the light of theories of language variation and change. Through the practical experience of using corpora you will gain on this module, you will learn about the issues involved in conducting this kind of research, so that you will be able to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of particular research techniques, methods or strategies that are applied within corpus studies of language variation and change Not only will this enable you to see how research in this field is conducted, it will provide you with opportunities to develop key transferable skills in the quantitative and qualitative analysis of large datasets, the interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data (particularly quantitative reasoning skills), the use of computerised databases and tools for statistical analysis, and the presentation of research data and analysis both verbally and in writing. Working in small groups will enhance your abilities to collaborate with others, to justify and take decisions, to manage a research project and to work independently.

More information

EL6058 -

Language, Meaning and the Mind (Optional,20 Credits)

This module provides a detailed overview of the key concepts and issues in semantics (the study of language meaning). Along the way, we will discover a range of tools for analysing language and we will be engaging with current debates in linguistic theory. The module takes a problem-solving, interactive approach to analysing meaning and is designed to develop your ability to discover patterns (and exceptions) in language data.

More information

EL7005 -

Dissertation (Core,60 Credits)

The module will give you the opportunity to complete either an independent research project of your choice on a topic in English language, linguistics or TESOL, or a practice-based project.

You will be working under the supervision of at least one member of staff either to plan, undertake and write up a small research project, or to reflect on your experience during a teacher-training course. You will learn how to plan, manage and organise a relatively large scale research or practice-based project. To successfully carry out your project, you will need to draw on skills and knowledge acquired during your programme. Throughout your dissertation project, you will learn how to identify interesting research questions and how to apply different data collection and analysis techniques to answer these questions.

The module will equip you with transferrable skills that are highly valued by employers including management, organisational and analytical skills.

You will be required to submit 3 formative assessments totalling 4,000 words (a research proposal, a critical bibliography and a research timeline/plan), and a 12,000 word final dissertation. As well as individual tutorials with your supervisor(s), there will be four two-hour research lectures to support you in your work.

More information

EL7038 -

Research Methods (Core,20 Credits)

This 20-credit module aims to provide students, whether they regard themselves as predominantly practitioners or researchers, with the conceptual and analytical tools necessary to conduct informed and responsible enquiry in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics, including language education. You will develop your knowledge and understanding of a range of research methods in these related fields. You will extend your ability to critically evaluate empirical research articles, including the suitability of different research approaches, instruments and methods of analysis to address the research questions/hypotheses developed.

On successful completion, you will be able to: reflect critically on the research methods used in existing Linguistics, Applied Linguistics and language education research; construct an appropriate research design for any given research question and/or hypothesis; select and undertake appropriate methods of data collection and analysis (including introductory descriptive and inferential statistical analysis); and accurately report research outcomes.

You will thus explore and undertake both quantitative and qualitative data collection and data analysis (through SPSS and NVivo), focusing on: developing clear and addressable research questions/hypotheses; research ethics; experimental design; and researching with language/textual data, including with corpora. The module will also investigate the use of specific research instruments such as questionnaires and other survey scales, focus groups and interviews as well as observation, self-report and introspection measures.

On completion, students will be ready to conduct informed research at postgraduate level in the fields of Linguistics and/or Applied Linguistics and, as such, the module will help you prepare for your subsequent Masters’ dissertation.

More information

EL7040 -

Sociolinguistics (Optional,20 Credits)

This 20-credit module will develop your awareness and understanding of the field of Sociolinguistics, the interface between language and society. You will analyse critically, by means of lecture input and seminar discussion, the main research themes in the field. As such, you will pay particular attention to a range of important specialist theories within Sociolinguistics and evaluate historical, contemporary and emerging empirical research investigating the social meaning of linguistic variation.

You will study a number of key topics: social and regional linguistic variation and change in the UK and beyond; language and identity; language attitudes and ideologies; the social and linguistic factors which drive language variation and change; stylistic variation in language use; multilingualism; discourse and pragmatic variation; and quantitative and qualitative approaches to sociolinguistic study. Throughout the module, you will evaluate the many varied socio-psychological and contextual perspectives regarding the role of language and society which you encounter and establish your own view of and position within contemporary debates within the field, developing your ability to present your own viewpoint, both in speech and in writing.

More information

EL7041 -

Negotiated Study (Optional,20 Credits)

This module enables students to negotiate a programme of work with a supervisor to investigate a field of interest that is not catered for by other postgraduate modules. The teaching will comprise six half-hour tutorials with a supervisor, but students are expected to undertake the major portion of the semester's study on their own. Where more than one student is interested in a particular field, some classes may be held in lieu of tutorials. The content, level of achievement required, and total workload will be comparable with those of other postgraduate modules in the programme, although the balance of taught and independent work may be adjusted to allow for lower teaching contact hours.

The MA Programme Leader will be informed throughout the process of syllabus development, this overview ensuring the area or topic in is not covered elsewhere in the core or option modules, and that there is no repetition of content for the student(s).

Like all other MA modules, assessment will be a combination of either theoretical essay, language description and analysis or other appropriate work totalling the equivalent of 4,000 words. Topics and titles will be negotiated by the supervisor and student(s).

More information

EL7047 -

Investigating Language for TESOL (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with a range of descriptive, critical, and analytical tools that will enable you to examine the English language. You will acquire the skills required for analysing key aspects of language. You will also be equipped with the necessary skills for examining the relationship between language and meaning in a range of contexts. The module highlights phenomena which present difficulties for learners of a second or foreign language and shows how a detailed understanding of language in context, using linguistic data from a range of sources, such as narrative, classroom discourse, figurative language, and corpora, can be used as an effective tool in the teaching and learning of English as another language. You will also engage with current debates in linguistic theory and applied linguistics develop the skills necessary for discovering patterns in language theory and data.

More information

EL7048 -

TESOL Syllabus & Materials Design (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the principles of both TESOL materials and syllabus design, and give you practical experience of developing materials and courses for TESOL students. The experience that you gain through participating in the course and completing the assignments will be of both practical and theoretical use for career development, through further training and potential employment in the TESOL field. You will consider a variety of learning materials and course designs, tying these in with pedagogic and methodological approaches. You will also look at how courses and materials have developed historically, and how linguistic and pedagogic elements are accounted for. Throughout the module, you will be encouraged to develop a working knowledge of the principles behind designing classroom materials and course syllabuses, and a critical stance towards the examples presented to you. You will also develop the skills necessary to design and critically evaluate a set of language learning materials, and a short course for TESOL learners.

More information

EL7049 -

Professional Practice of TESOL (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to current TESOL methodology, trace its development and map its possible future. You will be exposed to current debates in the TESOL profession including issues around the use of native and non-native English teachers. The module also has practicum sessions which require you put theory into practice. The experience that you gain will be of both intellectual and practical value for career development and your potential employment in the TESOL field.

The areas of grammar, pronunciation and lexis, receptive and productive skills and lesson planning will also be considered. You will gain wide ranging experience in planning appropriate lessons and delivering them during the practicum sessions. You will also learn through observing others in practice as well as gain useful feedback from your classmates.

Through engaging in the module, you will be expected to develop, 1) familiarity with a variety of methods and approaches, 2) awareness of appropriate methodology for delivering language lessons, 3) practical skill in using appropriate methodology in the delivery of lessons.

At the end of this module, you will 1) have further experience of TESOL methodology, 2) be able to take a critical stance with regard to classroom practice, 3) have experience of planning and delivering appropriate lessons, and be able to justify the pedagogical choices made.

More information

EL7050 -

Investigating Second Language Acquisition (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will critically analyse and review changes in theoretical perspectives of second language acquisition, and consider empirical research designed to test these theories. You will trace development of second language acquisition theory as well as considering more recent theoretical developments looking at models which include Contrastive Analysis, Interlanguage theories, Universal Grammar, Cognitive models and the roles of input, interaction and output. You will also consider the impact of individual differences on second language learning success, including a focus on cognitive and affective factors. The intention is that you will develop a deeper understanding of the relationship between theory, data, and practice and encourage critical reflection.

More information

EL7051 -

Exploring the TESOL Classroom (Core,20 Credits)

Drawing upon an Applied Linguistics perspective, this 20-credit module explores the Teaching of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)/English Language Teaching (ELT), and language teaching and learning more generally, looking specifically at ‘what takes place’ in the second language classroom. It investigates the key questions and dilemmas around classroom practice, focusing on the implications of these debates for ELT practitioners and for how they/we teach.

On this module, therefore, you will engage critically with current key debates in second language pedagogy, linking your own teaching and learning experiences to theory and the research literature. Areas examined include classroom interaction and management, language teaching methods and the emergence of a Postmethod era within ELT, and the attributes and attitudes which learners bring to the language learning classroom. Throughout, students’ own (and differing) social and institutional contexts for English language teaching/learning will be recognised.

You will thus reflect critically upon social and historical trends within applied linguistics and English language teaching, recognising the complexity and diversity of ELT classrooms around the world, establishing your own ‘sense of plausibility’ about pedagogic practice and theory in relation to your own (current or future) professional context.

Your studies during this wide-ranging module may also help you identify aspects of the language learning classroom which you find particularly interesting. This may form a basis for studying them further during your MA dissertation.

More information

EL7052 -

TESOL in the World (Core,20 Credits)

Drawing upon an Applied Linguistics perspective, this 20-credit module explores key issues and debates in the TESOL field. It investigates key questions and dilemmas around TESOL within educational, technological, economic, linguistic, sociocultural, and historical/political contextual frameworks, focusing on the implications of these debates for ELT stakeholders.

On this module, therefore, you will engage critically with current key debates which would include topics such as (1) World Englishes (2) Innovation and creativity in the TESOL classroom (technology and other options like the flipped classroom, using drama, art, etc.); (3) Culture, Intercultural communication and TESOL; (4) Literacy and TESOL (EAL and ESOL) ; (5) TESOL for Young learners; (6) Bilingualism, multilingualism including the role of L1; and (7) Instructed SLA.

You will thus reflect critically upon social and historical trends within applied linguistics and English language teaching, recognising the complexity and diversity of ELT classrooms around the world, establishing your own ‘sense of plausibility’ about pedagogic practice and theory in relation to your own (current or future) professional context.

Your studies during this wide-ranging module may also help you identify aspects of the language learning classroom which you find particularly interesting. This may form a basis for studying them further during your MA dissertation.

More information

YC7000 -

Academic Language Skills for Social Sciences & Humanities (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Effective reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.
• Discussing ethical issues in research, and analysing results.
• Describing bias and limitations of research.

More information

Study Options

The following alternative study options are available for this course:

Any Questions?

Our Applicant Services team will be happy to help.  They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901 or by using our Contact Form.


All information is accurate at the time of sharing.

Full time Courses starting in 2023 are primarily delivered via on-campus face to face learning but may include elements of online learning. We continue to monitor government and local authority guidance in relation to Covid-19 and we are ready and able to flex accordingly to ensure the health and safety of our students and staff.

Contact time is subject to increase or decrease in line with additional restrictions imposed by the government or the University in the interest of maintaining the health and safety and wellbeing of students, staff, and visitors, potentially to a full online offer, should further restrictions be deemed necessary in future. Our online activity will be delivered through Blackboard Ultra, enabling collaboration, connection and engagement with materials and people.

 

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.


Your Learning Experience

Find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions
northumbria.ac.uk/terms

Fees and Funding
northumbria.ac.uk/fees

Admissions Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy

Admissions Complaints Policy
northumbria.ac.uk/complaints

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Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

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NU World Virtual Tours
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Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

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