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Professor Emile Rugamika Chimusa Inaugural Lecture

Lecture Theatre 002

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TBC

TBC

About the Speaker

Professor Emile R. Chimusa is an internationally recognised computational population genomics and bioinformatics researcher and an experienced educator. He has recently joined Northumbria from the University of Cape Town, where he served as Associate Professor and Programme director of PGDip/MSc/PhD in Computational Health Informatics and Honours in Human Genetics and Forensic Genetics.

He has been a part of a wide array of International Research Consortiums that he has received both research and industry focused funding from the South African National Research Foundation, South African Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Newton Fund, Canadian International Development Fund, NIH, The Wellcome Trust and Health~Holland. In total, he has received over £17.7 million in research funding as PI or Co-investigator. His research has been published in high-impact international journals and presented both at major scientific conferences and in broadcast, print, and web-based media worldwide. He has a record of accomplishment in designing and developing Computational and Bioinformatics tools (https://github.com/echimusa).

 


Event Details

Lecture Theatre 002
Business & Law Building, Northumbria University
City Campus East
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 8ST


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