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Do you have a passion for film and TV and a desire to bring stories to life on screen? Are you looking for a flexible course with the opportunity to specialise in production or screenwriting?

Taught by lecturers who are filmmakers and screenwriters, this course takes a ‘learn by doing’ approach. You will write scripts, research concepts and make your own films and TV programmes. The strong practical element, coupled with a work placement with partners including the BBC, ITV, Third Films and Arcus Animations, ensure you will graduate with a diverse portfolio and the creative knowledge to take you into the broadcasting industry and beyond.

Our alumni credits include on Mandella: Long Walk to Freedom, Four Lions, Game of Thrones and Vera.

90% of Film and TV Production students say that staff make the subject interesting and are good at explaining things (Unistats, 2016)

Do you have a passion for film and TV and a desire to bring stories to life on screen? Are you looking for a flexible course with the opportunity to specialise in production or screenwriting?

Taught by lecturers who are filmmakers and screenwriters, this course takes a ‘learn by doing’ approach. You will write scripts, research concepts and make your own films and TV programmes. The strong practical element, coupled with a work placement with partners including the BBC, ITV, Third Films and Arcus Animations, ensure you will graduate with a diverse portfolio and the creative knowledge to take you into the broadcasting industry and beyond.

Our alumni credits include on Mandella: Long Walk to Freedom, Four Lions, Game of Thrones and Vera.

90% of Film and TV Production students say that staff make the subject interesting and are good at explaining things (Unistats, 2016)

Course Information

UCAS Code
P310

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Arts

Location
Lipman Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Arts

Book an Open Day / Experience Film and TV Production BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Film and TV Production. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You will be guided by lecturers with real experience, many of whom are active in the industry. Our academic team includes BAFTA nominees, TV Drama writers and award-winning producers and directors. You will also have the opportunity to interact with a wealth of industry contacts and alumni who support the course in many different ways, from industry talks and guest lectures to student placements, keeping the course content fresh and relevant.

The insight and practical knowledge you will gain from this first hand contact will help you develop the professional skills you will need to move into the challenging but rewarding film and television industry.

86% of Film and Television Production students say that staff are enthusiastic about what they are teaching and are good at explaining things.

Book an Open Day / Experience Film and TV Production BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Film and TV Production. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

From developing ideas, to recording and post production you will be hands-on from the start. We firmly believe it’s the best way to learn.

We embed a practical element into all aspects of the course, connecting the critical analysis of the lecture theatre to workshops and demonstrations. Whether you’re working on: live project briefs; as a student film crew on documentaries, dramas and experimental films; or developing screenplays and scripts, the majority of practical modules result in a piece of work that will enhance your graduate portfolio.

Assessment is varied and takes the form of class tests, presentations, portfolios of practical work, critical evaluations and essays. We will give you clear feedback on work highlighting the strengths and giving you a clear idea of ways to improve.

Staff / Meet the Team

Book an Open Day / Experience Film and TV Production BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Film and TV Production. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

As a Film and TV Production student, you will have access to broadcast-quality camera equipment, production facilities and screening rooms.

Specialist technology includes screenwriting formatting software, production equipment in camera, lighting and sound departments, post-production editing suites, with specialist sound and grading suites. The eLearning Portal provides quick access to course materials and support, course information, such as class materials, handbooks and supplementary materials (e.g. weblinks, news items) as well as working as a communication hub.

 

Virtual Tour

Come and explore our outstanding facilities in this interactive virtual tour.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience Film and TV Production BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Film and TV Production. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

From character research in screen writing to finding out the precise time of day sunlight hits a particular building, films and TV programmes are defined by the quality of research. This course explores the processes that characterise film and TV at all levels. Many modules are directly informed by the research specialisms of the academic team, many of whom are internationally recognised for their work in media and film. You will be encouraged to draw from this knowledge, adding depth to your own film and TV projects through your own research findings.

Recent research projects include work on 1930s horror cinema, cult cinema, British science fiction television, the media satirist Chris Morris, and women in the British television industry. Production lecturers have recently completed a feature film ‘Sanctuary’ shot in Ireland and ‘Bosc’ shot in Northern Spain. Creative documentary ‘Camrex’ has been screening at international film festivals..

 

Book An Open Day / Experience Film and TV Production BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Film and TV Production. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Film and TV Production is a practical, industry focused programme with a wealth of industry contacts and a focus on ‘learning through doing’.

Employability is embedded into everything we do. Many modules have been designed in consultation with industry to ensure you graduate with the skills that employers are looking for. You will work with outside agencies and get involved with live project briefs for shows which may include Wolfblood, Beowulf, George Gently, Vera or The Dumping Ground. In your second year you will complete a 20-day work placement with one of our partners including the BBC, ITV and Third Films.

We also boast an innovative stepping stone to industry, the Initiate Scheme where you can work alongside tutors and graduate industry entrants on a film project that begins when the final year assessments end.

This practical approach is designed to develop strong teamwork, communication, problem solving and entrepreneurial skills as well as providing you with a broad portfolio to showcase your practical work. 

   

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience Film and TV Production BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Film and TV Production. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Our strong connections with industry mean the degree has an excellent reputation with employers. We have worked closely with practicing specialists to design a course that develops versatile, creative graduates with the technical skills that are so important in this competitive industry.

On completion you will be well placed to move into a career as a producer, editor, director or screen writer. Graduates from the course include cinematographer Lol Crawley (Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, Four Lions, Utopia 2), director Neil Marshall (The Descent, Game of Thrones) director of photography, Si Bell (Vera, Ripper Street, Fortitude) and screenwriter Sean Conway (Ray Donovan, All I See is You directed by Marc Forster (World War Z)).

You can find other alumni on TV shows such as Peepshow, The Inbetweeners, This is England 90’, Shameless, Wolfblood, Ripper Street, and Cuckoo and films My Week with Marilyn, A Song for Marion, All I See Is You, Prometheus.

Book an Open Day / Experience Film and TV Production BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Film and TV Production. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

A Film and TV Production degree is an ideal choice if you are visual and imaginative with an interest in broadcasting, and a fascination for creative production techniques.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

A portfolio of creative design work available for consideration.

This portfolio containing examples of your work is to help us understand your creative experience and potential ability to undertake a degree in Design. It should evidence your interests in your creative specialism to date. It may include past and current school or college work, personal projects, work in progress and other work that you feel demonstrates your creative potential.

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Diploma in Foundation Studies Art and Design/Art Design and Media The Diploma in Foundation Studies Art and Design/Art Design and Media is also accepted in combination with other qualifications

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 units at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

MI4001 -

Film & TV Production 1 (Core, 20 Credits)

Film & TV Production 1 introduces you to the methods and approaches used to make effective practical media productions.

Developing towards the production of a short documentary project, this module introduces you to camera, sound and lighting, location, filming technology and the associated production techniques. It pursues an understanding of film making conventions alongside the protocols of teamwork. The project focuses on collaborative processes with defined roles and standard practices which will see you undertake a number of classic camera exercises and location process, while learning how to articulate a film idea from script to screen. The module will introduce you, not only to professional filming equipment and how to use it effectively, but also how to structure and organise your film to the best creative and narrative effect. The documentary script treatments are generated in the parallel module Screenwriting 1 and the chosen treatments are then shared out in the production teams to be filmed and edited. Following a series of camera exercises and location crew activities, you will take the treatments and make a short documentary film with the theme ‘portrait of a person’. The production takes 11 weeks, with the first half of the semester dedicated to the practical exercises and techniques and the second half to the planning and production of the work to completion.

More information

MI4002 -

Experimental Film 1 (Core, 20 Credits)

Experimental Film is a micro movie project that introduces you to the methods and approaches that filmmakers have used in delivering personal and experimental projects.
It chooses to foreground frame-by-frame filmmaking (animation) as a solution to the brief, with the definition being the manipulation of a timeline, the manipulation of an image and work that goes ‘beyond live-action’, as used by experimental animation pioneer Dick Arnall, to describe frame-by-frame approaches that are in opposition to mainstream live action filmmaking.

A key aspect of animated filmmaking is condensing and the economy of presentation and here the ‘micro-movie’ duration of the brief helps to develop individual filmmaking and writing for the screen skills, while acknowledging the potential for oppositional approaches to making work and the context in which short, personal filmmaking takes place.

Here, the potential for experimental approaches to methods and materials and the condensing of narratives is augmented by pre-visualisation through experimental animation storyboarding.

Being an individual endeavour, the module allows you to engage deeply with the complete production process from ideation, through testing and validation to filming and post-production.

More information

MI4003 -

Screenwriting 1 (Core, 20 Credits)

This module is about gaining a real grounding in the core principles that govern screenwriting in fiction and documentary. It will introduce you to the main principles of screenwriting theory and encourage you to deploy these in practical exercises that allow you to write strong and coherent proposals and scripts based on intensive research. These will be considered through discussion within an informed and supportive environment. You will also be
introduced to the history and development of screenwriting.
The module is taught by lectures which set out the aims and learning outcomes of each session and are followed by screenwriting workshops where
you develop and pitch ideas and work on drafts.
Summative assessment comprises a documentary project that is assessed on proposal and script (50% - 1500 words equivalent) and a screenplay devel-opment and production theory exercise, which is assessed by small group visual script projects (50% - 1500 words equivalent).
The module is articulated around two projects - one in each semester: Semester 1 sees you work on a documentary project, and semester 2 a fiction
production. There is also an experimental project to begin with. The content of the module is structured around:

1. The historical development of screenwriting.
2. Characterisation.
3. Narrative structure and storytelling.
4. Analysis of film structures as narrative vehicles.
5. Dialogue writing for the screen.
6. Documentary research and screenplay development.

More information

MI4004 -

Professional Practice 1 (Core, 20 Credits)

The professional media industry employs a wide range of standard tools, mechanisms, forms and regulatory procedures to make sure media productions run smoothly, safely, legally, ethically, on time, and under budget. Employers tell us that graduates who know and can apply these techniques- as well as demonstrate a cultural overview of their craft - are extremely valuable to them at entry level and can play a genuinely useful role in supporting real industry productions.

In this module, you will learn a range of basic production management techniques which will equip you to run all your student productions (as well as future professional productions) more successfully and you will be introduced to techniques of creative thinking, group working strategies, legal/ ethical considerations and risk assessment techniques. Tutors also devote time on this module to supporting and developing your academic and practical study skills that will underpin a successful completion of the Media Production programme, as well as provide you with an overview of the key social, historical and stylistic contexts of the film and television industry in order to gear you towards careers in a wide variety of media production sectors.

In essence the module considers what it is to become a filmmaker, in terms of not only practical considerations but also a cultural mindset which will allow you to enter into creative discussions with your professional peers and potential employers as a more fully rounded and informed practitioner.

More information

MI4005 -

Sound and Post Production 1 (Core, 20 Credits)

Sound and Post Production 1 aims to introduce you to the considerations and definitions surrounding sound and post production in film production.

Sound is an often overlooked aspect of film production, but it is a powerful tool in adding resonance to productions and also needs to be technically precise.

This introductory module looks at the place of sound in your understanding of film projects, it covers technical sound theory and engages with the practicalities of effective sound recording and basic mixing.

Editing is one of the key skills in delivering projects and this module introduces you to non linear editing platforms, in workshops that include the architecture of the platforms, workflows, basic editing techniques and delivery formats.

You will make a ‘soundscape’ to discover the potential of sound and also attend editing workshops to become conversant with the processes of editing.

More information

MI4017 -

Films for Filmmakers 1: Critical Concepts in Film and Television Studies (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the major critical, historical and aesthetic approaches and issues in film and television studies, in order to provide you with an understanding of some of the key ways in which films and filmmakers have been analysed. Through learning about a variety of critical approaches to film and television, you will develop academic research skills and analytical techniques that will deepen your understanding of your own creative practice. Topic covered will include: film language, narrative, authorship, Hollywood and non-Hollywood cinema, genre and representation.

More information

YA5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Arts (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5003 -

Arts Study Abroad (60 credit) (Optional, 60 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 60 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

AD5022 -

Arts Study Abroad (60 credit) Semester 1 (Optional, 60 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 60 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

MI5001 -

Film Production 2 - Documentary (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about narrative and storytelling in film and TV documentaries. This will include learning about the history, theory and practice of existing influential documentaries, developing your skills in identifying a strong factual storyline, and then learning how to pitch, plan, and produce a short documentary film. You will also learn how to reflect critically on your own film and those of others. The module includes sessions on: consideration of contemporary trends in factual production and commissioning, the relationship with the ‘real’, the key elements of narrative documentary, observational filming techniques, establishing the documentary idea and creating a successful proposal or pitch, building a relationship with your contributor and planning a successful shoot, shooting script development and scheduling, copyright, consent and legal issues, keeping your storylines on track, managing the logistics of production and logging, creative documentary – and the blurred line with fiction, critiquing a documentary and writing a reflective commentary, editing for story and truth, and tracking and recording your own insights and learning.

More information

MI5002 -

Screenwriting 2 - Writer's Room (Optional, 20 Credits)

This is the second module in the Screenwriting pathway and this time allows you to take part in the TV Writer’s Room.

The TV writer’s room is a unique environment where lead by your tutor, you will work on a serialised television series from initial idea through to final draft stage of the script development process. This process uses the creativity of the whole class to break story’, create compelling characters, and structure a multi-episodic scripted drama. You will work on an individual script, from treatment stage through to first, and second draft stage with a final third draft polish. You will respond to notes, learn how to write believable dialogue and credible screen directions, you will also learn how to write to deadlines, construct an episodic treatment, and how to take creative direction from the series Showrunner – your module tutor. Each individual episode will have a twenty four minute runtime. This is an intense and advanced experience, essential for all students interested in a screenwriting or script editing career. It is also very useful for potential writer/directors, or creative producers.

More information

MI5004 -

Sound and Post Production 2 (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module is predominantly research-based, as it requires you to engage in critical research into and reflection upon professional production skills and methods. You will also be expected to create test material, which explores technique and style as you work towards creating your final portfolio as well as demonstrate an ability to reflect on this process. There is support for this process, through class based discussion and practice, eLearning resources and tutorials. Tutor’s research interests and professional experience also inform the delivery of the module content. The assessment task requires you to demonstrate critically and practically informed research, combined with a reflection upon your own development of these skills and methods.

More information

MI5005 -

Screenwriting 2 - Screenplay Workshop (Optional, 20 Credits)

This is the first module in the Screenwriting pathway.

The module aims to enable you to develop the potential of ideas into a realised screenplay work. Tutors will facilitate and encourage critical discussion of the screenplay work within an informed and supportive environment and also support you to develop your ability to use the techniques and processes of screenplay writing to create strong and coherent stories. You will also be enabled to develop screenplays within an appropriate format to a professional standard such as writing for the screen in two specific areas: short films and serialised screenwriting for television. This module builds upon the skills learned in Screenwriting 1 at Level 4 and allows you to follow this specialist pathway in Screenwriting on the programme.

You will be expected to have demonstrated an understanding and practical application of how to structure a story in both short scripts and longer form scripts to maximum dramatic effect. You will have completed a practical demonstration of how to delineate and develop characters and how to write screen dialogue.

More information

MI5006 -

Professional Practice 2 (Core, 20 Credits)

This module provides a two-fold approach to your professional practice within a real world context. Firstly, it foregrounds the importance of a work placement or brief project in you gaining understanding of the operations of the media industries. Classes will focus on you developing a wide range of skills to equip you for a media career, ranging from the expertise needed to set up and operate as a freelancer, through negotiating and networking skills, to employment rights and idea development. This contextual section of the module also aims to introduce you to the requirements and considerations facing graduates about to enter the media and creative industries, in order to help you bridge the gap between education and post-graduation employment. During this section you will develop greater awareness and first-hand experience of the industries in which you hope to work as well as hone your professional attitude, etiquette and employability skills. During the second half of the module, you will be supported in the search for a work placement or brief project in the media industry, which you will carry out and evaluate within the scope of the module.

In addition to the placement, the module also provides an opportunity for you to consider the skills and attributes considered most important by employers (both in the media industries and other sectors) and to set targets to address your skills gaps and boost your employability before you enter your graduation year. Within a personal portfolio you will develop items that will support your future career such as an updated CV, a showreel, a short case study of an employer or a written reflection on a networking event.

More information

MI5007 -

Films For Filmmakers 2 (Core, 20 Credits)

This module builds on knowledge gained in Films for Filmmakers 1 delivered in Level 4.
An ongoing critical exploration of film and television texts should have a real component in a filmmaker’s practice. The viewing, sharing and engaging in critical discussions surrounding these texts inspire new ideas and creative conversations and are fundamental in the development of a filmmaker’s sensibility. With reference to specific film texts and related critical debates, you will be required to reflect on your individual learning on the module, and the implications for your own practice.

As filmmakers you must be able to discuss your films in the fullest, most accurate way possible in order to provide the correct conceptual framework for an audience to approach the text. This means reflecting on your own practice to refine concepts and articulate techniques for collaborators, funding applications, pitches, screenings and interviews.

This module seeks to provoke discussion about a wide selection of films and sessions are underpinned by academic structures that promote creative sensibility. It will also offer insight into the influences and context of work on the programme team, and then it allows you to get involved by presenting work that has influenced you in critical presentations.

The module aims to make you think about watching films critically and in an active manner as well as developing forums for discussion and argument.

More information

MI5020 -

Film & TV Production 2 - Drama (Optional, 20 Credits)

This is the second module in the Film & TV Production pathway and this time allows you to learn about Drama, building on your knowledge gained in Documentary.

This module focuses on current film and TV industry practices in content production for fiction with a wider creative and critical awareness. It encourages independent and innovative thinking alongside an increased ability to organise for practical production in ways relevant to current practices.

This module explores fictional forms including cross genre formats and feature film practices in the contemporary film & television industries. The module develops key entry-level skills for the fiction film industry, delivered through a combination of workshops, tutorials, and independent viewing. It also specifically develops skills in developing and pitching ideas.

Small self-motivated production teams or crews will produce one production of eight to twelve minutes in length during the module. Fictional formats will use existing scripts produced in second year modules.

You will receive a single individual portfolio mark, made up of an element reflecting the success of your group production, a personal evaluation of the film and production process, a pitch presentation, and an element based on your individual skill development and personal contribution, assessed through a learning diary and a peer review process.

More information

MI5021 -

Directing Actors (Optional, 20 Credits)

Directing actors for the screen focuses on the skills and practices used by directors when working with actors in film and television. This practice-based module will explore the craft of the director through a series of practical workshops leading onto a short video production. Aspects of drama production for the screen such as casting, rehearsal and textural interpretation are covered in this module.

More information

MI5022 -

Cinematography (Optional, 20 Credits)

This Module further develops and embeds concepts introduced in Film Production 1, building on your knowledge of specialist camera equipment and visual language. Cinematography describes the art of photography and camerawork in film making, not just capturing pretty pictures. The camera is a cinematic tool and its use should inform audience perception of plot and character. Cinematic storytelling manipulates our emotions, revealing character and plot - sometimes without our immediate knowledge. The audience may not be consciously aware – but can feel it has meaning. Cinematography exists in context and its only purpose is to serve the material at hand. There are 6 main components related to Cinematography. As well as being technical, these can be used as part of a creative design to make your audience ‘feel’.
• Camera Placement
• Lens Selection
• Movement
• Composition
• Lighting
• Colour palette

These components are all inter-related and the possibilities are infinite – but all fall within this framework. This module will explore and explain how to master these components in practical and aesthetic terms. The module also introduces you to more specialist camera equipment, particularly the Sony F5 camera and prime lenses - a state of the art camera system widely used in industry. You will learn how to operate the Sony F5 camera as well as understand its advanced menu systems and features with a view to enhancing your visual work, in aesthetic terms, as well as in a practical sense. This knowledge can then be applied to enhance all your subsequent films.

More information

MI5023 -

Creative Development (Optional, 20 Credits)

This Creative Development module is where you get the opportunity to develop stories, approaches and creative deportments with a range of creative activities in preparation for your 3rd year work.

The module is designed to enable you to investigate and explore the potential of stories by employing alternative creative techniques &/or oblique strategies. It should stimulate new approaches to storytelling for you, in-part challenging pre-conceived notions of narrative, and stimulating original ideas/practice. You are required to evidence critical engagement within your work, demonstrating a progression of ideas to reach your final submitted piece. You will learn how to challenge conformity in films and stories, research into work that is created through personal history and responses, apply creative approaches and techniques to stimulate the imagination, explore the possibility of a story through a place, use objects to stimulate story ideas and approaches, find stories in the creation and manipulation of images, stimulate ideas through the creation and manipulation of sound and communicate your ideas through a film manifesto.

More information

YA5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Arts (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5001 -

Arts Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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AD5002 -

Arts Study Abroad Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

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MI6001 -

Film and TV Production 3 (Optional, 40 Credits)

Film and TV Production 3 is the concluding module of your chosen specialist pathway in Film & TV Production, where you get the opportunity to produce a practical project portfolio of work that is the culmination and demonstration of all that you have learned in the programme modules but specifically follows submission to your chosen pathway.

You propose your own portfolio of practical work appropriate to your production specialism and project interests. This work is effectively your ‘graduation’ material and you can propose to be project instigators such as, but not limited to, directors, producers or animators or project facilitators, that provide the all important craft skills such as camera, sound and editing roles.

You propose and present your project(s) in an industry style ‘pitch’ and spend the bulk of the module carrying out the work supervised by appropriate tutors who will support and advise the production work and a practical dissertation model of delivery.

Whilst it is you that articulates the relevant practical processes and approaches in a coherent portfolio of film production work you are also required to reflect and critically engage with the ideas and materials of your portfolio, in order to show analytical thinking and add value to the work.

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MI6002 -

Screenwriting 3 (Optional, 40 Credits)

Screenwriting 3 is the concluding module of your chosen specialist pathway in Film & TV Production, where you get the opportunity to produce a practical project portfolio of work that is the culmination and demonstration of all that you have learned in the programme modules, but specifically follows submission to your chosen pathway.

You will learn how to develop a feature film script from idea to final draft, or a TV pilot and series bible from idea to final draft . There is also a’ project to write a short f by the end of the course, which can be done in conjunction with other students on the course from either pathway. Through this module you will learn advanced methodologies for creating compelling characters, strong narrative structures, believable dialogue, whilst maintaining the author’s original voice. You will learn how to work as part of a creative team through writer’s room sessions and build on what you have already learned in relation to modern screenwriting theories. You will also develop a professional attitude to your work, enabling you to take notes and apply them to the script, hit draft deadlines and become a valuable member of a creative team. You will be able to work on your own to a structured delivery pattern and to initiate and resolve your own research.
This final screenwriting module, should be regarded as the capstone of your study in the form, it relies on full participation from each student, who is required to attend all workshops, tutorials and any associated writer’s rooms (which are made available on request.)

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MI6003 -

Experimental Film 2 (Core, 20 Credits)

Robin Blaetz says; ”Experimental and avant-garde film is cinema made outside of the film industry on an artisanal basis, largely without regard to the struc-tures and demands of traditional narrative film. While experimental film as a separate mode of film practice is international, it’s most prevalent manifesta-tions were in western Europe before World War II and North America and Britain in the postwar period. Avant-garde film is often produced in the context of the larger art world, particularly in relation to the visual arts and literature. It is also frequently produced as a critique of dominant, classical Hollywood cinema and functions in relation to political movements and strategies, such as feminism.”

Whilst you learned about personal filmmaking that went ‘beyond live action’ in the introductory Experimental Film 1, here you articulate the
conceptualisation of ideas informed by historical, cultural and critical contexts that are derived from the avant-garde, in forms that challenge and subvert traditional filmmaking approaches.

You will demonstrate your understanding either by researching and writing an essay on an aspect of experimental filmmaking or by making your own per-sonal response to the critical ideas presented in the lectures and seminars.

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MI6005 -

Popular Music on Film and Television (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module is concerned with popular music culture and its relationship to film, an area much neglected in academic film studies, television studies and popular music studies. As such, it seeks to address this absence by looking at a number of key junctures where popular music culture, the cinema and television inter-relate, exploring debates about gender representation, authorship, genre and music in performance, as well as how the films studied relate to context of their production and reception. The module, therefore, covers topics such as the following in a largely chronological fashion. An indicative syllabus is as follows:
1. Early moments: The significance of the early Elvis Films: King Creole
2. Punk rock on film: The Great Rock n’ Roll Swindle
3. The revisionist musical: Von Trier, Lhurmann et al
4. Popular Music and national identity: The Commitments
5. Popular Music and ‘Race’ representation: 8 Mile
6. Gender play: Velvet Goldmine, In Bed with Madonna
7. The popular music / rock documentary
8. Dance and the male body: Saturday Night Fever
9. The concert film" from Wadleigh's Woodstock to Godard's One plus One.
10. Critical approaches to music video: Corbijn, Cunningham et al.
11. Nostalgia and the popular musical biopic: Control

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MI6007 -

Cult Film and Television (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn to understand how the term ‘cult’ has been applied to film and television programmes in different ways, and how the concept has developed across history. The module will enable you to critically examine the ways that cult has been theorised both in relation to films and television programmes, and some of the key differences between cult television and cult film. You will understand how cult can be applied to both films, the reception of films, as well as how it has increasingly infiltrated marketing discourses. Case studies on the module include midnight movies, authorship and cult, fandom, telefantasy, censorship and controversy, exploitation cinema and global cult cinema.

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MI6009 -

The Modern American Horror Film (Optional, 20 Credits)

The modern period in American horror cinema is generally seen as beginning in 1968 with the release of Night of the Living Dead. This module explores the wide range of American horror films produced since that date. It identifies key themes, formats and cycles, and it engages with the relation of the horror genre to changes in the American film industry and to broader social and historical change. It also explores the aesthetic innovations and challenges offered by new forms of horror. In taking the module, you will acquire an understanding of the critical and cultural issues raised by this important area of American culture and you will develop your own insights into such iconic films as The Exorcist, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (both versions), Carrie, Halloween, Silence of the Lambs, Candyman and Hostel, among others.

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MI6017 -

Professional Practice 3 (Core, 20 Credits)

The Professional Practice 3 module introduces you to media marketing, distribution, exhibition and financing the development and production of films. The module includes a basic understanding of financial agreements and their importance in funding films.

The module introduces you to the notion and practices of media marketing through developing a marketing portfolio for an actual project you are associated with or a craft skill that you wish to promote (for example; yourself as a cinematographer, screenwriter, producer etc).
It will show you the various approaches and contexts of distribution with regard to both traditional forms and the potential for new exhibition platforms. The module also introduces you to various forms of film finance available both in the UK and the rest of the world, covering such aspects as related legal issues with the development and production of film.

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MI6019 -

Storyworlds (Core, 20 Credits)

In a landscape of ubiquitous media platforms and fragmented viewing habits, how can traditional media content be reconfigured to take
advantage of the potential for transmedia?
The 360 degree commissioning process is now an accepted part of the media production landscape; films and TV programmes exist, extend their range and interact with audiences on a range of platforms, screens and formats – transmedia. Practitioners need to become aware of the strategies and techniques used for adding value and resonance to their content and story ideas across multi-platforms.

‘Storyworlds’ aims to explore the place of transmedia both as a marketing opportunity in non-traditional media locations, as a narrative tool to expand the core content’s story universe and as a way to engage with the concept of ‘the never ending story’ as found in transmedia production.

You will learn how to develop your own transmedia portfolio for a practical project of your choice as well as engaging in discussions to explore web and mobile content ideas that aim to expand the narrative universe and the untapped textures of core content across wider platforms.

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MP6009 -

Media and Morality (Optional, 20 Credits)

‘Media and Morality’ introduces you to a range of theoretical paradigms and arguments within moral philosophy. These ideas will be explored via contentious debates located in current affairs. Examples from news, media and popular culture will be drawn upon in order to a) illustrate the continuing relevance of moral concerns raised by classical thinkers such as Kant and Aristotle, and b) demonstrate the ubiquity of moral concerns in contemporary culture. The module aims to evince the ways in which moral theory can deepen our understanding of contentious issues that impact on our lives and rights as citizens. The module also aims to develop your ability to work with complex theoretical concepts and to present your views on such matters in the form of focused arguments (both during class discussion and the final written assessment).

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YA5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Arts (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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