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Are you looking to develop a global understanding of society, social dynamics and modern life; expertise in research and analysis; and strong decision-making skills? You will need an enquiring mind and a desire to get out into the community to see the ‘real issues’ and get involved in bringing about change.

You will graduate prepared for employment in a number of fields that require a sophisticated, critical and questioning understanding of the workings of society, including central government, the police, the prison system, community safety and education.

100% of Sociology students said that overall they were satisfied with the quality of this course (National Student Survey, 2016).

Are you looking to develop a global understanding of society, social dynamics and modern life; expertise in research and analysis; and strong decision-making skills? You will need an enquiring mind and a desire to get out into the community to see the ‘real issues’ and get involved in bringing about change.

You will graduate prepared for employment in a number of fields that require a sophisticated, critical and questioning understanding of the workings of society, including central government, the police, the prison system, community safety and education.

100% of Sociology students said that overall they were satisfied with the quality of this course (National Student Survey, 2016).

Course Information

UCAS Code
L300

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Social Sciences

Location
Lipman Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Social Sciences

Our Department of Social Sciences is a community that equips you to make a positive social change, become a critical thinker, a problem solver, and to challenge what you think, see and hear.

Sociology Blog / Discover More

Read the Sociology blog and find out more about the research and teaching from the department.

Book An Open Day / Experience Sociology BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Sociology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You will join a community of enquiring minds who are interested in international developments, analysing crime and the criminal justice system, communicating on a global scale through language, and challenging conventional wisdom.

Our assessment strategy is carefully designed to support student-centred learning. A key aim is to ensure that you have the opportunity to demonstrate that you have met the course’s learning outcomes. We do this by providing a combination of assessment feedback, support groups and one-to-one sessions with your tutor. Formative assessments are embedded across all modules, providing you with opportunities for development and continuous feedback throughout the course.

Book An Open Day / Experience Sociology BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Sociology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

We offer an exciting and extensive range of high-quality courses taught by leaders in the field, including 2014 holder of the British Sociological Society and Higher Education Academy National award for Excellence in Teaching Sociology, and the Chair of the European Group for Public Administration. 

Academics from our team were behind the information of the North East Homeless Think Tank - a regional agency bringing together academics, researchers and policy offers to inform and influence policies affecting homeless groups. Our staff regularly produce research outputs of international quality within world-leading, peer-reviewed journals and play leading roles in professional associations such as the British Sociological Association, the Social Policy Association, the Development Studies Association and the Academy of Social Sciences. 

Book An Open Day / Experience Sociology BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Sociology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You will be part of an exciting, vibrant and dynamic department which has received continued praise for the quality of teaching and learning experience, student support and engagement and research rich environment it affords students. Our academic team are actively involved in the ‘real issues’ that face the community through their research into homelessness, diversity, domestic violence, international development and the impact of de-industrialisation on community, class and gender.

We are a leading centre for energising creative practice and academic study. By working in partnership with a broad range of stakeholders, we seek to nurture ‘home-grown’ talent and, through meaningful engagement, business innovation, and knowledge creation at the highest level, support and grow the economic, social, cultural and intellectual capital of the region and beyond.

Book An Open Day / Experience Sociology BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Sociology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The course is designed to promote research-rich learning. The core modules are aimed at developing your understanding of social theory and research methods, enabling you to engage with contemporary debates, drawing on lectures and seminars which will allow you to explore how the discipline undertakes research.

The Research in Practice module gives you the opportunity to gain first-hand experience of working with leading charities and third sector organisations in the North East. The module is aimed at students who want to experience life as a social researcher, carrying out real world research that’s at the forefront of care support provision.

In 2016, Sociology at Northumbria scored 100% student satisfaction as a result of the excellent teaching learning and research informed student experience.

Book An Open Day / Experience Sociology BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Sociology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

We firmly believe that applying academic learning in the real world enhances your understanding and gives you invaluable skills to gain future employment. Career relevant placements at social housing providers, charities and local government form part of your module options in your final year. This makes our degree distinctive and sets you apart from the crowd.

We recognise that professional experience is invaluable to your learning, and have built strong partnerships with organisations including Arts Alliance, Traidcraft, VSO, New Writing North, the Youth Offending Team, Procter & Gamble, the British Council as well as organisations in France and Spain. You’ll have the opportunity to undertake research placements, volunteering and accredited work-related learning in challenging environments such as prisons, youth offending teams, homeless charities and parliamentary offices as well as exchanges with overseas universities.

Book an Open Day / Experience Sociology BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Sociology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Through this course you will develop a range of skills and attributes which will help you develop into an active agent of social change. You will develop a sociological imagination which allows you to critically link individual actions to social structures. You will critically evaluate evidence and theory in order to challenge your own ideas, justify your arguments and evaluate those of others.  You will apply appropriate theory and research methods to complex real world problems.  You will be trained in a range of forms of effective communication formats which address diverse audiences. Consequently you will graduate prepared for employment in a number of fields that require a sophisticated, critical and questioning understanding of the workings of society. Our graduates go on to work in the public and not-for-profit sectors including central government, the police, the prison system, community safety and education.

Book An Open Day / Experience Sociology BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Sociology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

Are you driven by a passion to improve the world around you? Do you want to make a difference to the society in which we live? This course will suit anyone with an enquiring mind and questions about how our society works.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

 

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels 

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma: Distinction, Distinction, Merit 

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher 

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB to include

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications</a

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

If you choose to complete an option module with a work experience/placement component you will be expected to pay additional transport cost. Actual costs would depend on the mode of transport you use.

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

CR4003 -

Real World Quantitative Research (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will allow you to become effective in conducting quantitative social research. It will begin by exploring the key philosophies and approaches associated with social research methods generally. It will then introduce the key mechanisms and approaches associated with quantitative methods of data collection and analysis. The module will explore essential mechanisms of data analysis through supported lab-based session using SPSS. By the end of this module, you will be confident to develop a quantitative based research project, identify and collect quantitative data and conduct essential data analysis using SPSS.

More information

SO4001 -

Social Policy, State and Society (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn to assess and evaluate competing approaches to theorising and analysing the relationship between the state, social problems, policy and citizens. You will evaluate a range of ideologies reflected in the formulation and implemention of social policies. You will also develop your knowledge of the role of the state in identifying, articulating and providing solutions to social problems. An important skill which you will also develop is the critical and reflective way in which you will evaluate the effectiveness of policy.

In the first instance you will learn to examine and assess a number of historical case studies concerning the theory and practice of social policy, for example The Poor Law Amendment Act of 1834, the Beveridge Report and The Suffragettes.

In the second part of the module you will explore post war austerity, the emergence of the welfare state and the contemporary welfare experience in the UK which has been referred to as a new age of austerity.

More information

SO4002 -

Global transformations (Core, 20 Credits)

On successful completion of this module, you should be able to:
- Identify and explain the importance of the key socio-historical processes that have shaped modernity
- Demonstrate an understanding of the different ways in which modernity and globalization affect diverse communities in the UK and internationally
- Explain key sociological issues in relation to the interaction of local, global and historical contexts
- Demonstrate an understanding of patterns of organisation and mobilisation by different groups and communities as they experience and respond to processes global and local change.

More information

SO4003 -

Thinking Sociologically 1 (Core, 20 Credits)

This module introduces some of the key figures in nineteenth century social theory and the founding figures in sociological theory. On this module, you will explore the meaning and application of a range of social theory, and the distinctiveness of thinking sociologically. You will examine key thinkers from sociology, and identify their contribution to understanding, and being able to address, some of the main problems and issues that frame sociology, such as those around social change, social identities, social divisions and power relationships.

Our aim is to have a practical approach to theory exploring how we can best use some of the ideas developed by early theorists to understand our own lives and the world in which we live. By the end of the module, you will be able to demonstrate the importance of theory in the understanding and explanation of the nature of the social world, understand the origins and development of key sociological theory, and introduce some of the main classical perspectives.

More information

SO4004 -

Thinking Sociologically 2 (Core, 20 Credits)

Following on from Thinking Sociologically 1 in Semester 1, this module focuses on early twentieth century theorists and addresses how they have influenced the way we understand the world around us. You will be introduced to contemporary critiques of classical sociological models through a consideration of how ideas evolved and challenged sociological thinking and approaches. We will apply a range of theory to contemporary social problems and debates, such as social division, changing identity, and investigate the shifting roles of the media, family, education, the body and emotions.

More information

SO4005 -

Working Lives (Core, 20 Credits)

1. You will develop skills in critical and reflective thinking.

2. You will learn how to analyse individuals' biographies, or 'life stories', as part of the sociological study of society

3. You will develop a critical, analytical and theoretical understanding of how the life course of individuals is influenced by work and employment experiences and social, economic, historical and political processes and contexts.

4. You will develop a range of practical and theoretical sociological skills associated with gathering data in an ethical manner, combining information from different sources and presenting it in verbal and written formats.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5019 -

Social Sciences Study Abroad (60 credit) (Optional, 60 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is a semester based 60 credit module which is available on degree courses which facilitate study abroad within the programme. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be constructed to meet the learning outcomes for the programme for the semester in question, dependent on suitable modules from the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). The module will be assessed by conversion of graded marks from the host University.

Learning outcomes on the year-long modules on which the student is unable to attend the home institution must be met at the host institution, and marks from the host are incorporated into the modules as part of the overall assessment.

More information

SO5001 -

Activism, Resistance and Social Change (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will explore the ways individuals and communities come together to challenge injustice and inequalities. The module is particularly concerned with the ways ordinary people try to challenge and resist the powerful and develop more just ways of organising society. You will critically explore both contemporary and historical ways of understanding and theorising activism and resistance, including studying individuals such as Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and M.K. Gandhi. A variety of case study examples will be examined each year, such as analysing anti-war demonstrations, anti-corporate activism and boycotts, environmental activism, trade union organising, new social movements, and diverse forms of feminist activism, as well as exploring campaigns such as Make Poverty History and the Occupy movement. You will analyse how and why people choose to take stand and what impact it has on them, as well as exploring different strategies of protest and resistance, such as violent and non-violent protest, activism via social media, and creativity as a form of activism and resistance. Cutting across North-South boundaries, you will engage with both UK and international examples to analyse the extent to which individuals and communities have been able to challenge the powerful, and the impacts this has had both immediately, and over time.

More information

SO5002 -

Sociology and Social Inequalities (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will draw upon a sociological imagination to critically examine the way in which a range of social inequalities (such as 'race', class, gender, disability and sexuality) are created, experienced, maintained and reproduced. This will be done through reference to competing theoretical and historical explanations as to the causes and nature of inequality. Both those that challenge and those that seek to legitimate the inevitablility of social inequality will be critically explored.

The module will be divided into two parts. In the first part you will draw upon and critically assess classical and contemporary sociological theories and ideas about the nature of social inequality such as ideology, intersectionality, symbolic violence, structuralism, material and cultural inequality.

In the second part you will critically apply and assess sociological ideas to historical and contemporary events which cast light on the nature of social inequality and the conflict that this stimulates. This will involve reference to case studies, for example, social class and deviance and disruption in the workplace, strikes, conflict and sabotage; cultural representations of the body and disability.

More information

SO5003 -

Contemporary Social Theory (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will come to understand the relevance of social theory and to evaluate a range of theories which seek to make sense of contemporary society and human lived experience. Key debates in sociological theory are examined as it seeks to grapple with the central features of contemporary society. How can social theory help us to understand contemporary inequalities, identities, culture and change ? Do we need new theories for a new age? When addressing these questions, there is a focus upon particular contemporary social theorists, whose work is at the cutting edge of contemporary sociology, criminology and cultural studies. We are not considering and evaluating theory for its own sake – if we can understand and analyse some of the key features, issues and problems of contemporary society and culture, we can more successfully intervene to influence social and cultural change.

More information

SO5004 -

The Sociology of Education (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will be introduced to key isses and debates in the sociology of education such as the emergence of education systems and how recent reforms have impacted on patterns of attainment. We examine explore some traditional questions such as the role of class, race and gender in schools as well as taking a biographical approach to the analysis of learning across the life course. We investigate the way that education can shape identities and how learning is implicated in wider patterns of social injustice.

More information

SO5005 -

Global Poverty and Development (Optional, 20 Credits)

We live in a world that is characterised by massive inequalities, with millions living on less than a $1 a day, whilst others seek remedies for over consumption. Power and resources tend to be concentrated in the hands of a small minority, largely located in Western Europe and the USA, whilst the largest numbers of people and vast majority of the world’s poor live in Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America.
This module focuses on patterns of global poverty, and historical and contemporary strategies to try and ‘make poverty history’. In particular, you will look at the idea of ‘development’ as central to those strategies, how its meanings have changed, and the different impacts ‘development’ can have on individuals and communities. You will learn about why, in the 21st Century and amongst great wealth and technological innovation, many people still live in abject poverty, and how the global community is coming together to try to reduce it.

More information

SO5006 -

Real World Qualitative Research (Core, 20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to enable you to become an effective qualitative social researcher.

In the first part of the module, you will learn about the philosophies and methods used by qualitative researchers in a real world context. Key to this will be covering ‘traditional’ qualitative methods such as interviews, focus groups and observations as well ‘contemporary’ methods including qualitative mapping, visual methods and online ethnographies.

In the second part of the module we will put that learning in to practice to explore how research projects evolve and how to select appropriate research strategies. In groups you will use qualitative methods to explore a key social issue within the context of Newcastle upon Tyne. To do this you will learn about the research process and will carry out a research project from start to finish, including planning a data collection strategy, going out and collecting that data, analysing it and reporting on it. In addition you will also complete a research risk assessment and an ethics form – all essential components of the research process.

Learning from this module will support you in most careers where research, people and analytical skills are needed.

More information

SO5008 -

Who Needs The Family? (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module, you will examine the family, as a key social institution, evaluate sociological and ideological perspectives of the ‘family’ as well as develop your knowledge and understanding of changes in family structures and roles. You will also examine the role of the state and its policies in influencing and supporting families, developing skills in finding, using, evaluating and presenting information.

You will assess and evaluate theoretical constructs, applying them to an analysis of the contemporary family, compare and evaluated aspects of international perspectives on the family and reflect upon and assess issues and debates concerning current and future family changes and public policy.

In this module, you will also develop a range of transferable skills, reading, note taking, data gathering, time management, presentation skills, group working, essay writing, effective referencing, interpreting evidence.

More information

SO5009 -

Sex and Gender in Society (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module we will examine the social construction and representation of gender in historical and contemporary society. The early classes will cover scholarship about the social construction of gender, and key themes such as the significance of the private/public binary in constructing gender. We will explore how the private/public binary has been used in the construction of gender, and how this binary impacts on lived realities of women and men, girls and boys. Later classes will examine a number of case studies, to enable students to study the operationalization of gender in culture, political institutions, and social structures. The case studies will explore the gendered aspects of, for example: intimacy, family and sexual relations; paid and unpaid work; formal and informal political life; representations of gender in the media. They will help you problematize the private/public binary and study in depth the social construction and lived realities of gender in contemporary society.

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SO5010 -

Consumption, Culture and Identities (Optional, 20 Credits)

The study of consumption and consumerism is a fundamental part of our everyday lives, experiences and identities. This module will explore a wide variety of sociological theories of consumption at both national and international level. It will introduce a range of approaches in order to help explore the political, cultural, global and historical context of consumption, branding and production. The module will offer students a unique opportunity to apply key contemporary and classical theories of consumption in order to explore the mapping of class, race and gender on consumer practices. Students are also encouraged to recognise the limitations of these ideas and to examine alternative theories of consumption and 'lifestyle'. They will also consider and evaluate a variety of sociological debates concerning global approaches to commodification and commercialisation by exploring the globalisation of food production and Fair Trade movements.

More information

YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AD5017 -

Social Sciences Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Work Placement Year module is a 120 credit year-long module available on degree courses which include a work placement year, taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6 (the length of the placement(s) will be determined by your programme but it can be no less than 30 weeks. You will undertake a guided work placement at a host organisation. This is a Pass/Fail module and so does not contribute to classification. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Work Placement Year)”. The learning and teaching on your placement will be recorded in the work placement agreement signed by the placement provider, the student, and the University.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AD5018 -

Social Sciences Study Abroad Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study at level 5 and before level 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

Note: Subject to placement clearance; this is a competitive process and a place on the module cannot be guaranteed.

More information

CR6009 -

Work Experience Dissertation (Optional, 40 Credits)

The module provides an opportunity for you to independently pursue your own piece of research based on work experience with an agency or organisation such as a police force, prison, youth offending team or voluntary sector organisation. You can also gain experience of research by working with a member of academic staff. With the support of a dissertation supervisor, you will seek to answer a research question either by collecting your own data, using existing data sets or by engaging in an analysis of the research literature. Your chosen topic will be linked to your work experience, which should last normally 80 hours. You will draw on and develop your research skills and on completion of the module you will be able to demonstrate the following: an extensive knowledge on your chosen dissertation topic, successful execution of a research project, the ability to set and explore a focused research question, the capacity to develop a structured and analytical argument; an aptitude for the application of theory and methodology; and an understanding of the ethical considerations of conducting your own research.

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SO6001 -

Intimate Partner Violence (Optional, 20 Credits)

The module provides a critical analysis of contemporary debates about intimate partner violence. Its focus is primarily the UK, with some consideration of the situation in the USA and other countries. On the module, we will draw primarily on sociological analysis, with some consideration of other disciplines (such as criminology and psychology). We will examine theoretical explanations of intimate partner violence in sociology, the policy and legal responses to it, and the social movement that has developed in response to it. You will gain an understanding of the sociological aspects of intimate partner, and the policy and activist responses to it, including relevant methodological issues.

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SO6002 -

Social Sciences Dissertation (Optional, 40 Credits)

This module will provide you will with an opportunity to independently pursue your own piece of research on a criminological or sociological topic of your choice. With the support of a dissertation supervisor, you will seek to develop and answer a research question either by collecting your own data, using existing data sets or by engaging in an analysis of the research literature.

As a result, you will draw on and develop your research skills and on completion of the dissertation module you will be able to demonstrate the following:
• an extensive knowledge of your dissertation topic
• having successfully executed a research project
• an ability to ask and respond to a focused research question
• the capacity to develop a structured and analytical argument
• an aptitude for the use of theory and methodology
• an understanding and experience of the ethical considerations of conducting research.

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SO6004 -

Radical Ideas in Sociology (Core, 20 Credits)

This module demonstrates the distinctive character and power of Sociology as a discipline for understanding, critically analysing and intervening within the most pressing and contemporary social issues, such as ‘new terrorism’, human migration, the global financial crisis and contemporary human slavery. You will explore theoretical and empirical sociological material, delivered by the module team, and a range of (other) eminent sociologists from the UK, lying at the cutting-edge of contemporary sociology will be discussed and critically analysed in terms of its significance for understanding, and intervening, within contemporary society and social life.

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SO6005 -

Images and Identity (Optional, 20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to enable you to engage with and develop advanced visual research methods skills to enable a critical engagement with key sociological issues around life narrative, biography, community and identity.

Through interactive workshops you will explore and develop a sound knowledge and understanding of the skills, philosophies and processes of using visual methodologies in social research. You will then put these skills into practice to addresses theoretical approaches to identity, community, biography and life narrative, drawing upon theories, methods and issues explored over the course of your undergraduate studies (including citizenship, work, leisure and consumption for example).

A tutorial system will be used to supported you to develop your own understanding and application of visual research methods in a contemporary social science context and will deliver an extended photo essay that demonstrates your learning on the module.

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SO6006 -

Global Exploitation, Conflict and Development (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will explore the contemporary global social, cultural, economic and political relationships that generate conflict and exploitation, as well as providing opportunities to intervene and to ‘help’. The module focuses on analysing issues such as natural resource exploitation, climate change, famine, poverty and war, disaster relief, and tourism in order to understand the complex relationships that shape people’s experiences of a contemporary global and unequal society. The module will explore the networks of transnational relationships between ordinary people in different parts of the world (such as through tourism or resource exploitation), as well as broader relationships, such as those between nation-states (such as through war and intervention) or through global economic restructuring (such as through global consumption). Understanding these relationships will enable us to understand and explain contemporary patterns and experiences of conflict and exploitation, as well as pointing to the ways changing global relationships may also help prevent events such as genocide, disaster or famine.

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SO6007 -

Workers and 'Chavs': The British Working Class (Optional, 20 Credits)

The British working class has long been of fascination to Social Scientists from Marx and Durkheim to Bourdieu and Gorz – each in turn have focussed on the question who and what is the working class and what is their likely part in the making of human history? This module critically and theoretically explores the origins of this class, its diversity and evolution and the efforts of that class to bring about social change. It critically explores the changing composition, organisation and power of that class in the 20th and early 21st century. This is a cutting edge module as it examines contemporary debates led by cultural commentators, politicians, researchers and theorists surrounding the nature and existance of class itself. Specifically the module seeks to explore the contemporary cultural and political assault on the working class, its power and legitimacy and questions how the class has gone from a cultural portrayal as ‘salt of the earth’ to ‘scum of the earth’ (Jones, 2011). This is achieved through an examination of the nature and impact of a neoliberal assault on the existance of the notion of social class on working class power, identity and organisation and on the working class experience of work and employment.

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SO6008 -

Making Sense of Happiness and Wellbeing (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will be introduced to the sociological study of happiness and wellbeing, posing questions about how we analyse notions of a good life and the efforts people make to flourish. We draw on sociological research as well as work from psychology, economics and philosophy to explore the significance of happiness for people’s identities and life course transitions. We discuss some of the traditional concerns of sociology such as social divisions and inequality (working through class, gender, ‘race’ and sexuality) relating these to the experience of happiness and the structuring of wellbeing. We draw on several case studies (such as wellbeing in other cultures, aging and young people) to illustrate how happiness functions as a social process that can be a site of struggle and conflict that features in many different aspects of life through families, friendships, intimacy, work and leisure.

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YC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Humanities & Social Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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