SW0725 - Becoming a Social Work Professional

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SYNOPSIS

This module will prepare students to undertake direct practice with service users, and for the first practice learning opportunity of 70 days which also comprises part of this module. This preparation will include 15 days development of skills for practice. This will include an opportunity to shadow a social worker. Assessment of “readiness for direct practice” will also be located in this module and take place before the commencement of the practice learning opportunity.
The taught syllabus comprises a number of core areas:
? Contexts and organisations:
? Understanding the professional context:
? Working collaboratively with others
? Managing self and communication skills

Lectures and workshops / seminars will be led by academic staff, current professional practitioners, service users and carers. Skills days will support students and social work stakeholders to explore the range of social work settings and contexts.

Assessment will comprise three parts:
? a workbook and DVD of an interview with a service user that assess both practice skills and professional capabilities at a level where students are judged ready for direct practice
? demonstration of capabilities in practice at appropriate level
? a brief reflective piece focussed on evaluation of learning during practice placement
A formative workbook and feedback from staff and peers will provide a vehicle for learning before entry to direct practice.

Learning in practice will be supported and assessed by an appointed practice educator in the workplace in relation to the development of practice capability to meet the required outcomes. Formative assessment will be provided within regular supervision sessions and via a mid- placement review of progress towards meeting professional standards.

Teaching and learning strategies provided by the practice assessor will include direct observation, practical experience, individual supervision, discussion, written work, reading, reflection and directed learning which supports professional practice and reflection on feedback from supervisor, service users, carers and other professionals. Students will have a guidance tutor to monitor professional development and provide systematic academic support during placement and to ensure programme requirements are met.

INDICATIVE READING LIST OR OTHER LEARNING RESOURCES

Allen, G. Langford, D. (2008) Effective interviewing in social work and social care. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Banks, S. (2012) Ethics and values in social work. 4th edition. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Dominelli, L. (2009) ‘Anti-oppressive practice in context’, in R. Adams, L. Dominelli & M. Payne (eds.),Social work; themes, issues and critical debates. 3rd edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp.2-29.

Davys, A. and Beddoe,L. ( 2010) Best practice in supervision; a guide for the helping professionals. London: Jessica Kingsley.

Doel, M and Best, L. (2008) Experiencing social work: learning from service users, London, Sage

Harding J. and Thompson J. (2012) Dispositions to stay and to succeed: Final report of the ‘What Works’ research project. Northumbria University

Horner, N. (2009) What is social work? Context and perspectives. 3rd edn. Exeter: Learning Matters.
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Howe, D. (2008) The emotionally intelligent social worker. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Howe, D., (2009) A brief introduction to social work. Basingstoke:Palgrave Macmillan.

Humphrey,,C. (2010) Becoming a social worker, London, Sage Publications Ltd

Koprowska, J. (2010) Communication and interpersonal skills in social work. Exeter: Learning Matters Ltd (Also as an E book).

Lishman, J. (2009) Communication in social work. Basingstoke: Macmillan Press.

Moss, B (2008) Communication Skills for Heath and Social Care. London: Sage Publications.

Shardlow, S. and Nelson, P. (2005) Introducing social work. London, Russell House Publishing.

Stogdon,C. (2010) Study skills for social workers. London: Sage Publications Ltd.

Thompson, N. (2012) Anti-discriminatory Practice. 5th Edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Thompson, N. (2011) Promoting equality; Challenging discrimination and oppression in the human service. 3rd edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Thompson, N. (2009) Understanding social work: Preparing for practice. 3rd edn. Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Trevithick, P. (2005), Social work skills: A practice handbook. 2nd edn. Buckingham: Open University Press.

Warren, J. (2007) Service user and carer participation in social work. Exeter: Learning Matters.

Watt, J (2013) Report writing for social workers. London, Sage/Learning Matters.

Journal Articles
Alexander, C. & Charles, G. (2009) ‘Caring, mutuality and reciprocity in social work – client relationships: rethinking principles of practice’, Journal of social work, 9(1) pp.5-22.
Kinman G. and Grant L. (2011) ‘Exploring stress resilience in trainee social workers: The role of emotional and social competencies’, British journal of social work 41, pp.261-275.
Maidment, J and Macfarlane, S, (2011) ‘Older women and craft: Extending educational horizons in considering wellbeing’, Social work education, 30:6 pp. 700-711.
Morrison, T. (2007) ‘Emotional intelligence, emotion and social work, context, characteristics, complications and contribution’, British journal of social work, 37, pp.245-263.
O’Sullivan, T. (2005) ‘Some theoretical propositions on the nature of practice wisdom’ Journal of social work, 5 (2), pp. 221-242.
Wilson, G. (2013) Evidencing reflective practice in social work education: Theoretical uncertainties and practical challenges. British journal of social work, (2013) 43, pp. 154–17.

Electronic Resources
Brown B (2011) The Power of Vulnerability TED Talks. Available online at: http://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability.html (accessed June 2012)
Aked J. and Thompson S. (2011) Five Ways to Wellbeing New Economics Foundation. Available on-line at: http://www.neweconomics.org/sites/neweconomics.org/files/Five_Ways_to_Wellbeing.pdf (accessed December 2012)
http://scie.org.uk

OUTLINE SYLLABUS

The curriculum will be delivered in both practice and the classroom.
The module will begin with initial induction to Northumbria study resources and support for information skills.
The curriculum will include:
Contexts and organisations:
? The nature and context of social work / social care organisations
? The concept of power / hierarchy/ organisational policies and procedures in shaping the role of professional social workers
? Organisational theory
? The context of the organisation and nature of relationships with the community.
? Awareness of policy and procedures in organisational settings
? The nature of accountability within organisational settings
Understanding the professional context:
? The role of the professional social worker in a range of settings
? Building relationships with key stakeholders: service users, carers , other professionals
? Different models of supervision and the importance of contributing to supervision to develop professional practice.
? Awareness of personal and professional boundaries and adherence to HCPC requirements
? Being a professional, professional roles and identity and how this relates to development as a social worker
? Developing strategies for self- responsibility and contributing positively to working in a team
Working collaboratively with others
? The different types of ‘teams’, their composition, level of integration and the organisational context of teams and how this impacts upon service delivery and/or professional practice.
? Effective team working across and within professions using group work theory and processes.
? Application of ‘team’ concepts to the wider social welfare arena, e.g. police, voluntary sector, community work, education, social enterprise.
? Different professional roles, professional discourse, values, ethics, cultures, power, status and professional history and how this impacts upon collaborative working and professional practice.
? Professional cultures, boundaries and ways of doing and ways of being

across different professions, recognising potential for boundary spanning and different models of practice.
? How organisational policies, professional guidance and protocols impact upon practice and collaborative working
? Knowledge and skills required working within joint processes, e.g. referral, assessment, care management.
? Issues of professional dangerousness and abuse, awareness of professional dilemmas and tensions across and between professionals and the impact upon service users, carers and their families. Be aware of the use of whistleblowing processes to address poor practice.
? Developing strategies for self- responsibility and contributing positively to working in a team
Managing Self
? Knowledge of self and impact on communication
? Knowledge of emotional resilience and management of self as applied to simulated practice situations
? Beginning knowledge of understanding personal and professional boundaries as applied to simulated practice situations.
? Verbal communication skills with a range of stakeholders
? Written communication skills in letters and reports for service users
? Interviewing skills, including listening, use of questioning techniques and telephone skills
? Assertiveness in professional situations
? Managing conflict and effective negotiation
? Understanding service user perspectives
? Diversity - developing awareness of the range of cultural, religious and ethnic perspectives in society in order to enhance and gauge the impact of these upon interpersonal skills.
? Methods of intervention.
? Skills for reflection in simulated practice situations.
Students will be supported by workshops and directed learning prior to the commencement of the 70 day practice placement the focus of which is consolidation of their understanding of the role of a social worker in practice settings. Where possible students will also be given the opportunity to access inter-professional workshops with other professional groups learning on campus. Opportunities to shadow a Social Worker will be available within this module.

AIMS OF MODULE

Before commencement of practice learning, this module aims to support learners to move from entry level to readiness to engage in direct practice, with an underpinning knowledge of communication skills for beginning social work practice. This will be located within a broader understanding of the social work role, collaborative working and the organisational context for practice. The module plays a key role in assessing learning in relation to Professional Capabilities at a level where the student is considered ready for direct social work practice learning.
This module will provide opportunities to enable students to acquire practice skills,
and integrate practice and academic learning in a practice environment. This will also provide the opportunity for holistic assessment of their professional capability at a level where they are assessed as capable at the level expected of a first placement.

LEARNING OUTCOMES

On successful completion students should be able to:
1. Demonstrate a range of knowledge and direct practice skills such that they have been assessed as ready for direct practice within TCSW guidelines
2. Demonstrate critical understanding of the role of the professional social worker in a range of contexts and work collaboratively with a range of key stakeholders
3. Critically appraise the role of supervision and make an active contribution in this process
4. Be able to demonstrate and take responsibility for managing self as a professional social worker within a range of organisational contexts providing social work services
5. Work collaboratively with a range of stakeholders
6. Work within guidance set out by The College of Social Work to successfully meet the Professional Capabilities for the end of the first professional practice in placement

PREREQUISITES

N/A

COREQUISITES

SW0723, SW0724

DISTANCE LEARNING DELIVERY

N/A

LEARNING AND TEACHING STRATEGY

Learning will be promoted by the use of lectures, seminars and directed learning. Small workshops will focus on skills development in relation to communication. Staff modelling and role play will be used to enhance the learning experience. Electronic materials will also be used. Service user and practitioner involvement in simulated interviews and recording of these will reinforce the authenticity of the learning offered on the module. Workshops will address user perspectives, managing conflict and work with specific service user groups. Students will
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explore factors which influence change and develop skills in interviewing and will be encouraged to develop skills in reflection and evaluation. A separate formative Workbook will be available for this part of the module. Students will be asked to reflect upon their communication skills in simulated interviews in role plays and following a recording with a service user or carer.
Learning in practice will be supported and assessed by an appointed practice educator in the workplace in relation to the development of practice competence to meet the PCF outcomes. Formative assessment will be provided within regular supervision sessions and via a mid- placement review of progress towards meeting professional standards. The summative assessment will be assessed by both the practice educator and the guidance tutor and will consist of a written record of professional practice and a written analysis of a piece of work undertaken in placement. The assessment strategy will enable students to demonstrate capability.
Teaching and learning strategies provided by the practice assessor will include direct observation, practical experience, individual supervision, discussion, written work, reading, reflection and directed learning which supports professional practice. Students will have a guidance tutor to monitor professional development and provide systematic academic support during placement.

ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACK STRATEGY

a Summative assessment and rationale for tasks
i. Workbook and DVD of Interview
Readiness for direct practice will be assessed through completion of a workbook and recorded interview with a service user Pass/Fail
ii. Record of Professional Practice
Submission of a complete and well presented practice learning portfolio including a signed recommendation from the practice educator that the student has met the full range of professional capabilities at a qualifying level. Pass/Fail.
iii. Reflective assignment exploring learning and development during practice learning 1,000 word with 400 appendix 100% of mark
b. Additional formative assessment – detail of process and rationale
Students will be required to submit a brief structured critical appraisal of a journal article early in the first semester. They will receive detailed feedback in the form of annotation. This is to support development of information skills.
Completion of workbook including personal reflection on giving and receiving feedback will support development of Task 1.
c. Indication of how students will get feedback and how this will support their learning
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Written feedback will be provided by tutor on formative workbook. Seminars will provide peer feedback on simulated interviewing skills.
The first two assessments will not be marked anonymously (given that they are identifiable)

IMPLICATIONS FOR CHOICE

N/A

Course info

Credits 30

Level of Study Postgraduate

Mode of Study 2 years full-time

Department Social Work, Education & Community Wellbeing

Location Coach Lane Campus, Northumbria University

City Newcastle

Start January 2020 or January 2021

Fee Information

Module Information

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