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Interested in the study of people and their behaviour? Want to find out more about the workings of the human mind? Whether you’re looking for a specialist area of psychology or prefer to follow a general route, Northumbria University’s BSc in Psychology could be the undergraduate course for you.

You will have the option to tailor your degree through option choice and leave with one of Northumbria University’s specialist awards or choose to follow the more general BSc (Hons) Psychology degree course.

Depending upon which route you choose to take, the following awards are potential outcomes of this course:  

  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Health Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Clinical Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Business Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Forensic Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Experimental Psychology)

Northumbria University’s psychology course is taught by experienced, approachable research-active staff who take an innovative approach to learning, you will develop an understanding of the theories behind the ways we think and behave, examining a wide range of psychology disciplines including; cognitive psychology, psychobiology, developmental and social psychology.

“95% of students said that they are satisfied overall with their course (National Student Survey, 2016)”

Lab sessions give you valuable hands-on practical experience and you’ll have access to state-of-the art facilities including the Brain Performance and Nutrition Research Centre.

The work placement and your final year research project will develop your personal and professional skills, and graduates will be eligible to apply for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society.

“99% of students said that Northumbria staff are good at explaining things (National Student Survey, 2016)”

 

 

Interested in the study of people and their behaviour? Want to find out more about the workings of the human mind? Whether you’re looking for a specialist area of psychology or prefer to follow a general route, Northumbria University’s BSc in Psychology could be the undergraduate course for you.

You will have the option to tailor your degree through option choice and leave with one of Northumbria University’s specialist awards or choose to follow the more general BSc (Hons) Psychology degree course.

Depending upon which route you choose to take, the following awards are potential outcomes of this course:  

  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Health Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Clinical Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Business Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Forensic Psychology)
  • BSc (Hons) Psychology (Experimental Psychology)

Northumbria University’s psychology course is taught by experienced, approachable research-active staff who take an innovative approach to learning, you will develop an understanding of the theories behind the ways we think and behave, examining a wide range of psychology disciplines including; cognitive psychology, psychobiology, developmental and social psychology.

“95% of students said that they are satisfied overall with their course (National Student Survey, 2016)”

Lab sessions give you valuable hands-on practical experience and you’ll have access to state-of-the art facilities including the Brain Performance and Nutrition Research Centre.

The work placement and your final year research project will develop your personal and professional skills, and graduates will be eligible to apply for Graduate Membership of the British Psychological Society.

“99% of students said that Northumbria staff are good at explaining things (National Student Survey, 2016)”

 

 

Course Information

UCAS Code
C800

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full time or 4 years full time with optional study abroad year

Department
Psychology

Location
Northumberland Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Psychology

Book an Open Day / Experience Psychology BA (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Psychology. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

If you have an interest in the study of people and their behaviour and want to find out more about the workings of the human mind then Northumbria’s British Psychological Society accredited psychology degree is the course for you.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

128-136 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma: Distinction, Distinction, Merit

Diploma in Foundation Studies Art and Design/Art Design and Media The Diploma in Foundation Studies Art and Design/Art Design and Media is also accepted in combination with other qualifications

Scottish Highers:

BBBBC - BBBBB at Higher level, BCC - BBB at Advanced Higher

Irish Highers:

ABBBB  - AABBB

IB Diploma:

128-136 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 27 credits at Distinction and 18 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually fro

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications</a

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

JC5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Psychology (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

PY0416 -

Introduction to Psychology (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to four key perspectives of psychology: social, biological, developmental and cognitive psychology.
In the social component you will learn how we navigate through our social world. This will include theories relating to impression formation, persuasion, and social influence. These theories will be exemplified with real-world examples to help demonstrate their practical implications.
The biological psychology component will introduce you to the key biological processes, for example, genetics, nervous, hormone and neurotransmitter systems that underpin psychology and behaviour. You will also learn about conditions that can occur when these how biological processes become faulty.
In the developmental psychology component you will learn how people develop across their lifetime. This component will discuss theories relating to attachment, intelligence, and developmental disorders and psychopathology. You will be provided with real-world examples to help you develop your understanding of how these theories can be applied.
The cognitive component will discuss key topics in this area, including memory, language, and perception. You will learn the basic aspects of cognition that are used in everyday life. You will also learn about psychological conditions associated with cognitive processes.

More information

PY0417 -

Psychological Research Methodologies (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will provide you with an introduction to quantitative data analysis, i.e. statistics. You will gain an understanding of fundamental concepts and principles in statistics. These include levels of measurement; standardised effect size measures; sample distributions, standard errors and confidence intervals; and statistical significance testing and the problems it causes.

In addition to basic principles, you will learn about a range of frequently used techniques for data analysis using the programmes SPSS and ESCII. For each of the techniques you will learn to identify when it is suitable to use; how to run the analysis; how to report its results to experts and lay people; and how to use these result to inform your critical judgement about your own research and that of others. The techniques you will learn about include descriptive statistics; the estimation of standardised effect sizes; t-tests and their non-parametric alternatives; chi2 to analyse proportions; meta-analysis; correlation; linear regression; and ANOVA.

More information

PY0418 -

Qualitative Psychological Laboratory Experience and Skills (Core, 20 Credits)

The module is designed to introduce you to the basic principles of qualitative research skills.

On this module you willl learn about qualitative research methodologies, written and verbal communication skills and other transferrable skills within Psychology. You will plan, conduct and report qualitative research studies in both formative and summative assessments. In addition, you will learn about research ethics, good practice in research and demonstrate a range of transferrable skills including communication skills and an understanding of the role of teamwork.

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PY0419 -

Quantitative Psychological Laboratory Experience and Skills (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will work in groups to learn how to design, conduct and report psychological research using quantitative methodologies. Individually, you will engage in the research process as both ‘researcher’ and ‘participant’, using a range of hard copy and software based data collection tools. You will learn how to handle data and present research findings, including the use of tables and figures, in scientific reports and oral presentations. You will discuss and evaluate ethical considerations in psychological research and learn how to write ethics documents in accordance with current conventions.

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PY0420 -

Personality and Health Psychology (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the basic principles involved in the study, investigation and explanation of personality and health psychology.

You will be introduced to the major theories and models of personality and health psychology. You will learn about the core issues and debates involved in the study of personality and health psychology through the understanding of the historical and contemporary development of the concepts and an evaluation of theories.

You will explore methods of measuring personality and problems you might encounter in doing so. You will also explore the relationship between society and health by focusing on health promotion campaigns, doctor-patient communication, social class, gender, culture, and lifespan issues.

In workshop discussions you will develop communication skills and begin to understand the role of teamwork.

You will also learn how knowledge of personality can be used and applied in the real world by health, clinical, occupational and forensic professionals. From this you will begin to be aware of and develop career interests. Similarly, as you begin to understand the role of health promotion campaigns the module will provide you with insight into real world career opportunities.

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PY0421 -

An Introduction to Mental Health (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the study and practice of clinical psychology, including mental health and mental illness. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM) is the most well known approach to classification of mental disorders. This manual will form the basis of the module. You will be introduced to a case study film clip each week illustrating the clinical presentation of a mental disorder ‘cluster’. A lecture will introduce the diagnostic criteria and basic aetiology and treatment protocol for each disorder. Workshop sessions will give you the opportunity to explore how theory may relate to practice and reflect on issues surrounding practice as a clinical psychologist.
The module will result in a broad debate around notions of mental illness and ‘clinical’ psychology. On completion of the module you will be able to demonstrate conceptual knowledge of theories of mental illnesses and the treatment of illnesses included in the DSM. You will also be able to demonstrate knowledge of the symptoms, epidemiology, aetiology and treatment of the disorders introduced in the lectures.

More information

ML5001 -

Unilang - Languages for all - Level 5 Placeholder (Optional, 20 Credits)

The 20-credit yearlong Unilang modules (stages 1 – 5 depending on language) aim to encourage a positive attitude to language learning and to develop and practise the four language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing introducing the basic/increasingly complex grammatical structures and vocabulary of the spoken and written language (depending on stage) and developing your ability to respond appropriately in the foreign language in spoken and written form in simple and increasingly complex everyday situations.

These modules also introduce you to the country and the culture of the country. In doing this, Unilang modules are intended to encourage and support international mobility; to enhance employability at home and abroad; to improve communication skills in the foreign language as well as English; to improve cultural awareness and, at the higher stages, to encourage access to foreign sources.

More information

PY0532 -

A Psychological Focus on Crime (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the psychopathy and personality-based approached to crime, as well as biological, social and cognitive correlates of crime, and the psychology of stalking and violent offenders. You will consider the application of psychological research and theory to the context of offending behaviour. Through the course of the module, you will explore how cognitive, social and other psychological processes shape offending behaviour and what interventions or management techniques have been used to reduce recidivism. You will also consider some of the ethical considerations involved in the treatment of offenders.

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PY0533 -

Eating Disorders (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will provide you with an understanding of the main clinical and epidemiological features of the eating disorders as classified in DSM V. You will learn about clinical management, as well as understanding of the variation of body image attitudes and perception and eating habits in normal healthy population.

The module covers topics such as; the clinical presentation of eating disorders, classification, diagnosis, and assessment of eating disorders, the role of dieting, the effect of culture, the physiology of appetite and obesity, body image distortion, eating disorders in children and men, and the treatment of eating disorders.

The module draws on many areas of psychology. Predisposing and precipitating factors for eating disorders are examined by considering empirical evidence from the biological, psychological, behavioural and socio-cultural domains. Specific risk factors explored include genetics, personality factors, cognitive factors and environmental factors, including the family, peer-group relations, adverse life experiences. The role of dieting and the effect of culture (including media) amongst some other things are explored as triggers.

More information

PY0534 -

Parapsychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will explore the scientific study of paranormal experiences. You will learn about the historical context for parapsychological enquiry and analyse the various theories providing explanations for paranormal belief. The focus of the module will be on the application of psychological research and theory to the context of anomalous experiences and beliefs.

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PY0536 -

Positive Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

The module is designed to introduce you to the basic principles regarding the study, investigation and explanation of optimal human functioning and well-being.

On this module you will be introduced to theories and models of well-being within the context of positive psychology. You will learn about the core issues involved in the study of well-being through the understanding of the historical and contemporary development of the concepts and an evaluation of theories.

Methods of measuring well-being and happiness and the challenges associated with this will be explored.

Strategies for increasing positive emotions, engagement, positive relationships, meaning in life, and accomplishment will be explored by focusing on empirical validation of interventions and exercises to try out in the context of your day-to-day life.

Through workshop discussions and formative group exercises you will develop communication skills and begin to understand the role of teamwork.

Through your understanding of applications of positive psychology interventions to the real world, such as by clinical psychology professionals, you will begin to be aware of career interests. Similarly, by critically evaluating research in the field of positive psychology you will begin to develop your skills for real world career opportunities.

More information

PY0537 -

Psychology and the Body (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about research and theoretical perspectives relating to the body and psychology (e.g. Embodied Cognition; Wilson, 2002). You will learn to understand and evaluate recent research in the area and aim to apply this knowledge to generating novel, sound, and testable hypotheses within this area of research. There is an emphasis on understanding experimental design both in terms of interpreting published research and in testing your own hypotheses.

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PY0538 -

Diet and the Brain (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the impact of foods, supplements and dietary regimens on an individual’s health: impacting everything from how you think (cognition), feel (mood, e.g. stress) and behave (e.g. your cognitive and physical function).
This area of psychology is very dynamic and our understanding is constantly updated by new data. As such, this module is heavily research-led with many individual research studies discussed in each lecture. You will learn why these studies were conducted (their rationale), how they tested their hypotheses (methods and tools), what they found and what these findings added to the literature and our understanding.
At the end of the module you will understand what it is to be a biological psychologist working within the field of nutrition and the main assignment, is a real-world example of the kind of report you would compile if you decided to work in this area

More information

PY0539 -

The Creative Mind (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will explore the theory and empirical research into the creative mind. The module will first cover an historical perspective of creativity research and highlight how early conceptualisations of creativity (e.g. evolutionary accounts) provided the groundwork for research examining the importance of creativity to the human experience. Research methods typically employed in the study of creativity will then be introduced. You will learn how traditional psychometric studies and new developments in the neurosciences can be used in tandem to examine this difficult to measure concept.

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PY0540 -

Social Psychology of Work (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will provide you with an understanding of social psychological theory and research applied to the workplace. The module will first cover an historical overview of social psychological research applied to the workplace. Research methods typically employed in the study of the social psychology of workplaces will then be introduced. The historical overview and research methods element of the module will then the set the scene for subsequent lectures, which will provide further insights into the social psychology of work. Topics will include: methods, motivation and reward, culture, groups and interactions, socialisation, justice, power and control, conflict, creativity, and future research directions.

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PY0541 -

The Psychology of Humour and Laughter (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the scientific study of humour and its application mainly in a clinical setting, but also how it could be applied in educational, occupational and other settings.

The module will first take an evolutionary perspective and you will learn about the biological basis of humour and the universality of laughter before moving on to explore the social context and function of humour. You will explore and enjoy different types of humour with cognitive, perceptual and emotional aspects being analysed. You will also explore the psychological and physiological correlates of humour and laughter in order to provide insight into the many, documented health benefits of humour and laughter in everyday life, especially that of psychological resilience.

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PY0542 -

Psychology Placement (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will gain experience and knowledge of working in a psychology-related placement, for a minimum of 70 hours. You will develop transferable skills, such as knowledge of confidentiality, data protection, communication, problem-solving, group work, time-management, self-management, and record keeping. You will work within a team whilst maintaining boundaries and building professional relationships.
In addition to these transferable skills, you will develop your psychological literacy; this is your understanding of how psychological knowledge can be applied to real-world problems

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PY0543 -

Business Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module, you will learn how psychological research and theory can be applied to the behaviour of people in business contexts. The module will use knowledge of the human mind and behaviour as a basis to investigate fundamental organisational functions such as leadership, motivation and people development in the context of human resource management, finance, marketing, strategy, and use of technology.

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PY0544 -

Technology for Experiments (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn knowledge and skills to apply technology in order to design experiments, collect data through
measurements and analyse the collected data. You will learn about the measurement process and the underlying physics and technology used during
measurements so that you will understand the capabilities and limitations of the technology when you design experiments. You will also learn
about factors which can affect measurements and measurement equipment, aspects such as noise, sensors, amplification, filtering and data storage. The interfacing between various pieces of equipment will also be addressed with treatment of the various interconnection options.

You will learn how to use specific equipment such as eye trackers, software for generating and analysing measurements and programming of experiments using cognitive testing packages and programming in open source software for data acquisition and analyses.

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PY0545 -

Topics in Forensic Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module, you will explore a range of topics to develop an understanding of the approaches to research and knowledge generation in forensic psychology. You will learn about Serial Killers, Sex Offenders, Psychological Profiling and Polygraphy, exploring questions such as ‘What makes a serial killer?’ and ‘What underlying factors drive the behaviour of sex offenders?’ These will be approached scientifically with reference to published research and theoretical frameworks. Discussions will examine the contribution made by forensic psychology research to our understanding of the causes, treatment and prevention of criminal behaviour in tandem with theoretical models, and cultural beliefs and practices.

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PY0546 -

Advanced Qualitative and Survey Methods and Lab Experience (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the more common advanced qualitative research methodologies and associated analyses employed in psychological studies. You will also learn how to design psychometric survey instruments and the process this involves. The module aims to provide practical skills in research design and operationalisation, the analysis of data and the interpretation, evaluation and subsequent reporting of research findings. In addition, you will have the opportunity to apply these research skills to the core areas of social and developmental psychology.

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PY0547 -

Psychobiology, Cognition and Individual Differences (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the psychobiological basis of human behaviour, memory and cognition, and individual differences, covering conceptual and historical development of the area as well as contemporary literature and debates. You will apply basic concepts of biological psychology to complex human behaviours like drug addiction, stress and aggression. You will also earn about a range of theoretical and applied topics within memory and cognition such as memory and attention, memory disorders and applied memory research. In addition, the module will cover the nature and dynamics of intelligence, the reasons why people differ in intelligence and personality, and where individual differences in intelligence and personality originate.

These three perspectives will be contextualised through the use of case studies and/or expert opinion embedded into the lecture series which will form the basis for points of discussion in the lectures. Towards the revision stage of the module you will be provided with guidance on literature searching, critical thinking skills and essay writing skills.

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PY0548 -

Advanced Experimental Methods and Lab Experience (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the more common advanced quantitative research methodologies and associated analyses employed in psychological experiments. The module aims to provide practical skills in research design and operationalisation, the analysis of data (using a computer package where appropriate), and the interpretation, evaluation and subsequent reporting of research findings. In addition, you will learn about research ethics, and have the opportunity to apply these research skills to the core areas of psychobiology, cognitive psychology and the study of individual differences.

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PY0549 -

Social and Developmental Psychology and Psychopathology (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about core theories and approaches used, and issues in social and developmental psychology and psychopathology. The relationship between psychopathology, society and development will be explored by focusing on context and culture. In addition you will learn about different methods and approaches used to investigate and report problems from a social, developmental and psychopathological perspective, and relate theory to practice by providing you with knowledge of different research techniques.

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PY0551 -

Psychology Study Abroad (Optional, 60 Credits)

The Study Abroad module is single semester 60 credit (30 ECTS) module which is available on the BSc (Hons) Psychology Framework, in level 5 semester 1. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to psychology modules taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). In order to ensure you meet the curriculum requirements for Graduate Basis for Chartership (GBC) with the British Psychological Society (BPS), you will be required to choose modules that allow you to study, and be assessed on your knowledge of, Psychobiology and Quantitative Research Methods, the remaining credits may be studied in any area of psychology. Your programme leader must see, and approve, the module descriptors of your chosen modules from the host institution.

Your study abroad semester will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. Therefore, it will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 60 credit Study Abroad Module. You will also receive a transcript of marks from your host university, showing the modules studied and marks awarded.

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PY0552 -

Research on Human Nature (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module we will examine the insights and research methods that are used within the fields of evolutionary psychology, human behavioural ecology, and anthropology, in order to understand human nature. We will look at the evolutionary pressures that have shaped the species, and how they might be apparent in our behaviour and cognition. Lecture topics covered include human evolution, biological adaptations, and evolved cognition, and their relationship to typical behaviours in contexts such as sexual partnerships and family networks. You will learn about some of the popular experimental and research techniques that are used in these fields, and gain practical expertise and experience in designing studies, creating stimuli, and collecting data. You will be taught some specific widely-used research methods, such as photographic and recording techniques, and the manipulation of photographic images and voice recordings.

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TE5507 -

Student Tutoring (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn how to be a tutor of students in schools or colleges. You will develop your skills in communicating effectively with children or young people. As part of this process you will learn how to evaluate your own learning of how to support these pupils’ learning over a series of lessons. You will be learning how to transmit your own enthusiasm for learning in a professional context to pupils within the schooling system. You will learn about the issues facing teachers and other professionals within the school, college or learning centre. Learning how to apply your existing skills and knowledge in a work related context will be an important focus of this module for you. Knowing how to determine which skills and knowledge are relevant, and make appropriate use of these in the work context, will be a major learning opportunity for you.

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ML6001 -

Unilang - Languages for All - Level 6 Placeholder (Optional, 20 Credits)

The 20-credit yearlong Unilang modules (stages 1 – 5 depending on language) aim to encourage a positive attitude to language learning and to develop and practise the four language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing introducing the basic/increasingly complex grammatical structures and vocabulary of the spoken and written language (depending on stage) and developing your ability to respond appropriately in spoken and written form in simple and increasingly complex everyday situations.

These modules also introduce you to the country and the culture of the country. In doing this, Unilang modules are intended to encourage and support international mobility; to enhance employability at home and abroad; to improve communication skills in the foreign language and in English as well as cultural awareness.

More information

PY0550 -

Psychology Study Abroad Year (Optional, 0 Credits)

The Study Abroad Year module is a full year 120 credit module which is available on degree courses which include a study abroad year which is taken as an additional year of study between levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at a European University under the ERASMUS+ exchange scheme or at an approved partner University elsewhere. This gives you access to modules from your discipline taught in a different learning culture and so broadens your overall experience of learning. The course of study abroad will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria). Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad Module and on your degree certificate in the following format – e.g. “BSc (Hon) Psychology (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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PY0645 -

Researching Working Memory in Clinical Contexts (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will examine the importance of working memory in a number of clinical and atypical developmental contexts. Based upon the theoretical work of Baddeley, Logie, Cowan, Engle, Cornoldi and Vecchi etc., the module aims to look at how researchers have employed working memory constructs within a variety of applied contexts. The sessions will cover research findings in atypical development with areas such Autism Spectrum Disorder, Down Syndrome, Williams Syndrome, ADHD, Fragile X, etc. being covered. The sessions will also cover a number areas of mental health, e.g. Unipolar Depression, Bipolar Depression, etc. You will have the opportunity to learn how psychology practitioner researchers make use of findings and theory in working memory in order to underpin their research rationales and methodologies. You will also have the opportunity to develop skills in research critique and evaluation.

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PY0646 -

Psychology of the Internet (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the impact of the Internet and other technologies on individuals, relationships and wider society. The focus of the module will be on the application of psychological research and theory to the context of online behaviour. Through the course of the module, you will explore how social and other psychological processes shape online behaviour. You will also investigate the ways in which websites are designed to capitalise on such influences. The module will cover key theories associated with communication online and will demonstrate the positive influence the Internet has had on domains such as health and purchasing as well as examining the negative side of the Internet in terms of for example deception and addiction.

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PY0648 -

Sleep and Circadian Rhythms (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will explore the biological and psychological processes of sleep and circadian rhythms across the lifespan; and critically reviews the various theories that have been posited to explain sleep and circadian rhythms. You will discuss and evaluate methods of assessment of sleep, including subjective (questionnaires, sleep diaries, clinical interviews) and objective measures (such as actigraphy and polysomnography), as well as the methods of assessment, diagnosis and treatment (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological) of sleep disorders. You will consider the epidemiology of sleep as well as factors underlying inter-individual differences in sleep and circadian rhythms. You will discuss the effects of sleep deprivation in terms of physical, neurological, psychological, and social outcomes and explore the relationships between sleep and physical and psychological health. You will also be introduced to research protocols designed to examine the effects of experimentally induced sleepiness and you will explore the concept of sleep as a health behaviour, and consider how it impacts on quality of life, and how public policy aims to address this. Key studies in relation to sleep and wakefulness which have directed theory, research and clinical practice will be presented and you will discuss these.

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PY0649 -

Plants and the Human Brain (Optional, 20 Credits)

n this module you will learn about the human psychopharmacology of plant derived chemicals – their effects and mechanisms of action with regards human brain function, and other health parameters. As such the module feeds into the ‘health’ pathway within the psychology programme.
In terms of content, the module will describe the psychopharmacology of the three main groups of secondary metabolites: the alkaloids, which provide us with caffeine, a host of poisons, a handful of hallucinogens, and most drugs of abuse (e.g. morphine, cocaine, amphetamines, LSD, and nicotine); the phenolics, including polyphenols, which constitute a significant and beneficial part of our natural diet in terms of their modulation of a range of health parameters; and the terpenes, a group of multifunctional compounds which provide us with the active components of cannabis and a multitude of herbal extracts such as sage, ginseng, ginkgo and valerian, all of which are purported to improve health and brain function.
The module will be unique in that you will also learn ‘why’ these plant- and fungus-derived chemicals have their effects on the human brain. In other words, what causes plants to synthesise chemicals that can have profound effects on the human brain? The answer to this question resides in the intersecting genetic heritage of mammals, plants, and insects and the surprising biological similarities between the three taxa, and the many ecological roles that these 'secondary metabolite' plant chemicals are trying to play for the plant. How these factors inter-relate with the human psychopharmacology of each of the main groups of plant chemicals will be discussed.

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PY0650 -

Alcoholism (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will explore the causes, effects of and treatments for alcohol abuse and dependence. The genetic, environmental and personality variables associated with alcoholism will be discussed and evaluated. You will learn how alcohol dependence does not exclusively affect the individual with the condition, but impinges on a wide range of close family members psychologically, and society at large in a psycho-social manner. Cross generational effects of alcohol dependence such as foetal alcohol syndrome will be considered closely. Specific attention will be drawn to the effects of alcohol dependence throughout the life course, and a focus on gender differences in causes/effects/outcomes will be made. Discussions will examine the contribution made by research to the causes, treatment and prevention of alcoholism in tandem with theoretical models, and cultural beliefs/practices.

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PY0651 -

Hormones and Behaviour (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about the role of the neuroendocrine system in relation to behaviour and cognition in animals and humans. You will focus on the application of behavioural endocrinology and theory to the study of behaviour. Through the course of the module, you will explore how the endocrine system influences both physiology and behaviour in cognitive, social and clinical contexts.

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PY0652 -

Organisational Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will develop an understanding of the application of psychology to organisations/workplaces. By drawing on psychological models, theory, research and evidence you will enhance your knowledge and understanding of behaviour in organisation. You will explore theory, concepts and application focusing on three levels: the individual employee, groups/teams and the organisational level. Topics covered include well-being in the workplace, recruitment and selection, and team working for example.

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PY0654 -

Sport and Exercise Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will examine a number of factors known to influence individual and group behaviour in sport and exercise. You will explore the scope and methods typically used in this discipline and critically evaluate approaches and theories which have had an impact on the direction of research and applications. You will consider the effects of social processes, the presence of audiences, and performing at ‘away’ venues, as well as whether individual differences can predict sports performance. You will debate cognitive and emotional effects of exercise, and you will evaluate methods for improving performance such as relaxation training, systematic desensitisation, imagery and self-talk.

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PY0655 -

Health Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about contemporary issues in Health Psychology. You will gain an insight into current research in Health Psychology and its applications. You will also gain an insight into the origins of Health Psychology and the ways in which these origins have influenced the discipline, as well as methods that are typically used in Health Psychology research. The module will also explore i) how personality and individual differences can influence physical health, ii) health promotion and techniques to modify health behaviours, iii) the interplay between stress and health, iv) health disparities and the physical health consequences of social deprivation, and v) the psychological causes and consequences of chronic physical illness.

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PY0656 -

Advanced Statistics using SAS (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will be introduced to the SAS analysis environment in which you will learn how to carry out more advanced quantitative methods, and to be able to compare these methods with those that you are familiar with in SPSS. You will start with an introduction to the SAS environment and its scripting language including basic data handling, data manipulation, descriptive statistical analysis and graphing. Then you will learn how to carry out analyses such as ANOVA and regression, with which you should already be familiar from your second year experience with SPSS. Finally, new and advanced analysis methods will be introduced and you will learn how to conduct, interpret and report these using the SAS environment.

You will learn how to communicate the results in the conventional manner and with due regard for the audience, and draw appropriate conclusions. You will also learn how to reflect critically on the use of such methods by yourselves and others.

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PY0657 -

Psychology Placement (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will gain experience and knowledge of working in a psychology-related placement, for a minimum of 70 hours. You will develop transferable skills, such as knowledge of confidentiality, data protection, communication, problem-solving, group work, time-management, self-management, and record keeping. You will work within a team whilst maintaining boundaries and building professional relationships.
In addition to these transferable skills, you will develop your psychological literacy; this is your understanding of how psychological knowledge can be applied to real-world problems

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PY0658 -

Applied Forensic Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will learn how research in forensic psychology has been applied in practice. Can we take eye witness testimony at face value? What sort of interviewing techniques provide the most reliable evidence? How can offenders be profiled? Is psychological profiling of benefit to the police? Are the personal dispositions and pre-delectations of criminals exposed through involuntary responses in a way that can be detected using polygraphy? These questions will be approached from an applied perspective with a focus on published research and its impact professional practice. Discussions will examine the contribution made by forensic psychology research to the criminal justice system and cultural beliefs/practices.

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PY0659 -

Consumer Psychology (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will examine the behaviour of consumers from a scientific perspective and analyse the various strategies utilised by advertisers and marketing and retail outlets to increase sales of consumer goods. The focus of the module will be on the application of psychological research and theory to the context of consumer behaviour. Through the course of the module, you will explore how cognitive, social and other psychological processes shape consumer behaviour. You will also investigate the ways in which marketing strategies are designed to capitalise on such influences.

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PY0660 -

Research Internship (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will gain experience and knowledge of working as a psychological research intern, for a minimum of 70 hours. You will develop transferable skills, such as knowledge of confidentiality, data protection, communication, problem-solving, group work, time-management, self-management, and record keeping.

In addition to these transferable skills, you will develop your psychological literacy; this is your understanding of how psychological knowledge learned elsewhere on the course can be applied to real-world problems

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PY0661 -

Neuropsychology and Cognitive Science (Core, 20 Credits)

The module is designed to introduce you to theory and empirical research into the study of neuropsychology and advanced cognitive science.

You will learn how traditional behavioural methods and neuroscience methodologies can be used in tandem to explore key issues and concepts . You will learn to consider and evaluate theory and develop an understanding of the strength and weaknesses of a variety of methodologies. Importantly, you will explore and develop knowledge related to the application of neuropsychological and cognitive research to a range of psychological processes.

For the neuropsychology component the module will sample from the following topics: neuroimaging, face and object recognition, emotion processing, hemispheric lateralisation, attention deficits, language disorders and developmental neuropsychology. For the cognitive component the module will sample from the following topics: methods of studying cognition, language learning andcomprehension, social cognition, concepts and categorisation, reasoning, decision making, cognitive modelling and musical cognition.

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PY0662 -

Mental Health Difficulties and Therapeutic Approaches (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will develop a critical understanding of the theoretical underpinning, research base and effectiveness of a range of mental health and psychological difficulties along with associated treatment and therapeutic approaches. In addition you will learn about, discuss and evaluate the diagnostic factors, aetiology, prognosis and factors influencing the outcome of several mental health difficulties, including anxiety, personality, mood and thought disorders. You will explore the conceptual and historical issues surrounding the topic of mental health and how the field has changed over time, and learn how to discuss and evaluate studies that have had a particular impact on the direction of theory, research and therapeutic applications.

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PY0663 -

Psychology Project (Core, 40 Credits)

On this module you will individually conceptualise, plan and execute an original piece of research. You will, through reading, understanding and critically appraising relevant psychological literature, formulate and operationalise a research question, and select and implement research methodologies and statistical techniques appropriate for answering your research question. You will also have the opportunity to disseminate your research findings via presentation at an undergraduate conference. You will, as part of applying for ethical approval for your proposed research, consider relevant ethical issues associated with your research, and you will highlight ways of addressing these issues. The module will allow you to develop a range of generic skills such as effective use of computers (i.e., for data entry, analysis and word processing), effective oral and written communication skills, evidence based reasoning and problem solving, self management and time keeping, as well as liaising and engaging in dialogue with other people related to your research (e.g., your supervisor and, where necessary, outside organisations).

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PY0664 -

Psychology of Intimacy (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn about a broad range of research perspectives on the processes and psychological factors involved in the study of love, sex and sexuality. The initiation, process and dissolution of intimate relationships are introduced and models of ‘normal’, ‘flourishing’ and ‘dysfunctional’ relationship behaviour will be reviewed. The module introduces a life span perspective on sex and sexuality, considers gender and expression of sexuality, psychosexual dysfunction and treatment and reproductive psychology. The module incorporates theoretical perspectives from individual differences, biopsychophysiological, psychoanalytic, evolutionary, social and clinical psychological perspectives.

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PY0665 -

Mental Health Problems and Crime (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this module, you will examine the association of mental health problems with criminal behaviour. As part of this module, you will be introduced to a diverse range to topics within the field of mental health and crime. You will explore research assessing the association of mental health problems with criminal behaviour. You will also discuss the role of mental health problems within the criminal justice system. As part of this module, you will be introduced to key debates within this field. Moreover, this will be discussed from a clinical and forensic perspective. Therefore, this module will incorporate elements of both clinical and forensic psychology.

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