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Would you like to refine your existing law degree with a specialist master's in criminal justice? Are you looking to advance your career as a solicitor or barrister, or maybe you are looking to change direction from your current undergraduate degree with a master's in the field of law?

This master's in law is part of Northumbria University's innovative and flexible LLM Law framework, which will allow you to study for your LLM with a specialism.

The Law (Criminal Justice) LLM branch specialism has been designed to meet the needs of legal practitioners, policy makers and other professionals who currently work, or hope to work in the field of criminal justice.

We also welcome applications from those of you who wish to engage in more detailed, academic study of criminal justice issues than you have previously. You will be provided with a deeper, contextual understanding of the law and the policy issues which affect professional practice. 

Our world leading academics will provide you with a critical understanding of contemporary issues in the field of criminal justice. This will include an introduction to criminal justice and forensics and themes around the theory and practice of punishment. This will include youth justice, transnational criminal law and comparative approaches to the law of evidence.

The LLM Law (Criminal Justice) allows you to gain an established postgraduate legal qualification, while specialising in this innovative field. This offers you an exceptional opportunity to gain career enhancing knowledge and skills which can be applied to a wide range of careers and so, this LLM Criminal Justice is an excellent specialism for;

  • Existing barristers, solicitors and forensic practitioners
  • The fields of rehabilitation
  • the police service
  • private investigation across the public, private and volunteer sectors
  • PhD study

We welcome applications from those of you with any undergraduate background and because of this, you will be part of a diverse and intellectually stimulating cohort. You will learn from each other’s experiences in a relaxed and collaborative environment.

Course Information

Level of Study
Postgraduate

Mode of Study
1 year Full Time

Department
Northumbria Law School

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

Videos / Law

Discover more about the wider academic experience at Northumbria Law School.

Book an Open Day / Experience LLM Criminal Justice

Visit an Open Day to really get an inside view of what it's like to study LLM Criminal Justice at Northumbria. Speak to staff and students from the course, get a tour of the facilities and discover your funding options.

You will study alongside a diverse cohort of LLM Law framework students, and have the flexibility to choose modules which inspire you and support your career aspirations.

In the first semester you will study one general module (Introduction to Legal Research) and two specialist modules (Criminal Justice, and Theories of Punishment). In the second semester you will study three specialist modules: Law of Evidence, Youth Justice and Transnational Criminal Law.

All specialist modules will be led by academics with an international reputation for research in Criminal Justice. You will learn through lectures, seminars and group work, all supported by advanced TEL (Technology Enhanced Learning).

You will have access to our e-Learning platform Blackboard, where you can re-watch all Panopto-recorded lectures and read workshop presentation slides at your own pace. Your assessment throughout will be coursework-based, with no exams.

Please note that to graduate with your specialist bracketed award you must undertake at least six taught modules within that specialism, and base your final research project (dissertation) on a topic in that area. Alternatively, you can do research during the third semester on policy issues informing and shaping future policy and law reform. This will be in collaboration with the Policy Clinic which is the latest addition to our multi-award-winning and world leading law clinic.

It will be possible to switch specialism after the first semester if your contextual module was relevant to your new choice. If you don’t meet these conditions, you will graduate with an LLM Law.

Book an Open Day / Experience LLM Criminal Justice

Visit an Open Day to get an inside view of what it's really like to study LLM Criminal Justice at Northumbria. Speak to staff and students from the course and discover your funding options.

The teaching staff at Northumbria Law School have a remarkable international reputation. They are carrying out cutting-edge research in established and emerging areas of law, and many are respected practitioners as well as theorists.

Lecturers on this course have expertise and experience in the areas of international treaties, human rights law and policy; knowledge that you can draw on for your LLM project.

Northumbria Law School is home to the Centre for Evidence and Criminal Justice Studies and the award winning Student Law Office. You will be able to write your dissertation under the supervision of a large number of specialists and leading experts on issues around Criminal Justice.

You will also profit from the research environment at Northumbria University, with regular talks given by internal and external speakers, organised by the Centre for Evidence or one of the various Research Interest Groups (e.g. RIG Science and Justice). You will also be able to work on and contribute towards policies by working at the Policy Clinic at the Student Law Office.

Book an Open Day / Experience LLM Criminal Justice

Visit an Open Day to get an inside view of what it's really like to study LLM Criminal Justice at Northumbria. Speak to staff and students from the course and discover your funding options.

Northumbria Law School provides first-class teaching in a world-class environment. You will be based in our award-winning City Campus East building, which houses our mock courtroom and Student Law Office as well as an array of lecture theatres, classrooms and a dedicated postgraduate study area.

It is also home to our specialist Law Practice Library,which contains practitioner materials as well as a wide variety of journals, databases, and law reports. The range and depth of resources reflects our position as the largest law school in the North East region.

The 24/7 University Library achieves some of the highest levels of student satisfaction in the UK, and has held the Cabinet Office accreditation for Customer Service Excellence since 2010.

 

Book an Open Day / Experience LLM Criminal Justice

Visit an Open Day to get an inside view of what it's really like to study LLM Criminal Justice at Northumbria. Speak to staff and students from the course and discover your funding options.

You will be immersed in research-rich learning from the outset of your studies. The lecturers who lead each specialism are at the forefront of research in that area, and will take every opportunity to engage you in their ongoing work.

You will also develop your own skills as a researcher. You will learn to critically reflect on your own and others’ work, challenge your own thinking, and justify your own work in the context of wider theories and practice.

As the programme is fundamentally underpinned by the research of staff in the Law School, you will be immersed in research-rich learning from the outset of your studies. The programme, as well as allowing research active staff to produce modules which will showcase their internationally recognised research, also has the advantage of providing flexibility in provision, and increased choice for you.

LLM Law (Criminal Justice) introduces the requirement of oral presentations but has a firm emphasis on students producing written research. All branch specialisms have the requirement that you are assessed in workshops for Research for Advanced Legal Study. This is to help promote a diverse and inclusive approach to assessment, providing tutor-led diagnostics and helping you succeed no matter what your background.

The Legal Research Project in semester three is your opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of legal research on a topic that you are truly passionate about, guided by a tutor with relevant expertise. It may take the form of a dissertation but may equally be work-based or practical in nature, and will allow you to contribute to the creation of new knowledge within Criminal Justice.

The programme will be attractive, irrespective of whether you are from the UK, Europe or an International student. You will benefit from the experience of staff who have taught International students for many years and the multicultural learning environment within the Faculty and the University.

The Legal Research Project in semester three is your opportunity to undertake a substantial piece of legal research on a topic you’re truly passionate about, guided by a tutor with relevant expertise. It may take the form of a dissertation but may equally be work-based or practical in nature and will allow you to contribute to the creation of new knowledge within International Criminal Justice.

Research / Northumbria Law School

Book an Open Day / Experience LLM Criminal Justice

Visit an Open Day to get an inside view of what it's really like to study LLM Criminal Justice at Northumbria. Speak to staff and students from the course and discover your funding options.

You will graduate from this course with independence of thought, boundless curiosity and a talent for collaboration – traits valued by every employer.

If you already have a qualifying UK law degree, this course will help you to enhance your CV with a specialism so that you stand out when competing for training contracts.

An LLM (Criminal Justice) will provide students with a thorough structural analysis of the essential aspects of the criminal justice system. Analytical skills and understanding of the complexity of criminal justice will be crucial across a range of different career paths, particularly the fact-finding skills and understanding of the various issues around forensic sciences in the context of criminal justice.

This LLM Criminal Justice MA is an excellent specialism for;

  • Existing barristers, solicitors and forensic practitioners
  • The fields of rehabilitation
  • the police service
  • private investigation across the public, private and volunteer sectors
  • PhD study

Studying a branch specialism in a cutting-edge area of law will provide you with the currency of academic knowledge and skills that employers and businesses crave. You will be taught by world leading experts, you will be engaging with the latest thinking and you will be developing the Northumbria graduate attributes that will give you a significant advantage in your chosen field.

If you are joining us from another legal jurisdiction you will be able to apply your specialist skills and knowledge in your home country, contributing to local priorities for growth in relevant areas. For students from countries that follow the Bologna Process and require two year of postgraduate study, it will be possible to study the LLM framework twice,choosing a different specialism each time. You will qualify for an alumni discount on the second year.

Alumni;

The Law LLM criminal justice is new this year, but you can meet one of our Law LLM graduates, Christine Doris Enakele here.

Book an Open Day / Experience LLM Criminal Justice

Visit an Open Day to get an inside view of what it's really like to study LLM Criminal Justice at Northumbria. Speak to staff and students from the course and discover your funding options.

Entry Requirements 2020/21

Standard Entry

Applicants should normally have:

A minimum of a 2:2 honours degree in either law, a relevant social science based discipline, or a relevant non-law degree. Relevant professional qualifications or suitable work experience will also be considered.

International qualifications:

If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English language requirements:

International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.5 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

 *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS.  You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2020/21 Entry

Full UK Fee: £8,190

Full EU Fee: £8,190

Full International Fee: £15,500

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

Scholarships and discounts

Click here for Home/EU scholarships and discounts information

Click here for International scholarships and discounts information

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

LW7088 -

Research for Advanced Legal Studies (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers a critical introduction to legal research methods. It is designed to ensure that you will be able to confidently embark on legal research on your Masters programme whatever your academic background or jurisdiction. Your lectures are designed to refresh and develop your understanding of legal research techniques, referencing and evaluating sources. In your workshops you will be provided with opportunities to undertake and obtain feedback upon a series of legal research and writing tasks, thus enabling you to develop critical understanding of what it meant by effective legal research, and how you yourself can become an effective legal researcher.

More information

LW7089 -

Legal Research Project (LLM Framework) (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will draw on your skills and knowledge acquired from the taught elements of the LLM branch specialism and will develop and refine these in the context of a self-chosen area of independent specialist study. You will develop; (1) your understanding and use of legal research techniques, (2) An ability to critically analyse and evaluate legal data, (3) the ability to handle complex legal material systematically and creatively including material at the forefront of the field of study, (4) a conceptual understanding of the research topic, (5) skill at showing a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current legal issues, (6) the ability to communicate legal information, arguments and conclusions within accepted academic conventions.

More information

LW7126 -

Youth Justice (Core,20 Credits)

Youth crime and justice is an area which continuously attracts political, legal and media attention with the ‘youth problem’ dominating headlines in recent years. However, youth crime is not a new phenomenon. This module explores the nature and extent of youth crime within England and Wales as well as introducing you to approaches to youth crime on an international level. The module will examine youth justice in its historical context and how the youth justice system has adapted over time as well as providing an overview of children and young people’s rights in the context of crime and criminal justice. The youth justice system will be outlined in the context of analysing approaches to youth justice policy, where you will look at current legislation and the roles and responsibilities that statutory partners have with young offenders in the youth justice system. The sentencing systems for young offenders, and the role of the youth court, will also be considered, as well as exploring the law and practice of diversion. The module will also provide you with an insight into the relevance of restorative justice as a response to youth offending as well as exploring current concerns surrounding gender, race and disproportionality that effect some young offenders.

Course Topics Outline
1. The nature and extent of youth crime & The aetiological explanations for youth crime
2. Historical, sociological and legal conceptions of childhood
3. Rights of the Child
4. Age of Criminal Responsibility & Doli Incapax
5. Approaches to Youth Justice Policy
6. Responsibilities of Statutory Partners to Young Offenders.
7. The Law and practice of Diversion
8. Sentencing options available to the Youth Court
9. Alternative approaches to Youth Justice - Restorative Justice (Theory and practice)
10. Approaches to youth crime in comparative jurisdictions
11. Welfare of Young Offenders
12. Race, Gender and Disproportionality

More information

LW7127 -

Criminal Justice and Forensic Science (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to theories of justice, principles of criminal law, and criminal justice theory as well as practice. It will proceed to critically examine the criminal process of England and Wales, and in particular, the institutions of criminal justice and forensic science. The module will finish with a study of social and ethical implications of the criminal process, and international trends. On completion of this module, you should be able to:
• analyse and critically discuss criminal justice processes with respect to the cultures and ethics of the criminal law;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary debates in theoretical and empirical literature about the relevant criminal justice and forensic institutions and their practices which form part of the forensic processes relevant to criminal justice so that they can state policies and laws with accuracy;
• have an independent ability to further their knowledge about, and research into, the issues arising from the topics and themes and to write about these issues in a structured and academic way.
Module topics outline

1. Introduction
2. Justice and principles of criminal law
3. Criminal justice theory
4. Criminal justice – institutions and the ‘system’.
a. The Police and ‘policing’
b. Prosecution and the courts
c. Reforming the CJS.
5. Forensic Science and the Criminal Justice System
a. Introduction to Forensic Process
b. What is/ are forensic science(s)? Who are forensic scientists?
c. The Forensic Science ‘marketplace’
6. The Criminal Investigation
a. Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation.
b. Forensic Identification Technologies & Processes
c. Police powers
7. DNA, Fingerprints and Identification
a. Fingerprints and DNA in the ‘Fight Against Crime’
b. Developments in DNA science & dactyloscopy
c. Resolving DNA controversies & reforming fingerprinting
8. Forensic Databases
a. Development of Forensic Identity Databases
b. Other forensic databases
9. Medical Aspects of the Forensic Process
a. Forensic Medical Examiners ('police surgeons')
b. Forensic pathologists
c. Coroners (pre and post-Shipman).
10. Criminal Appeals & Miscarriages of Justice
a. Forensic science as cause of miscarriages
b. DNA and Exonerating the Innocent
c. The Regulation of Forensic science
11. International Trends in Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
a. The international utility of forensic identification
b. International ‘standards’ & exchange
c. Trans-national forensic databases: The Future?
12. Criminal Justice and Forensic Science: Social and Ethical Issues
a. Criminalisation
b. The surveillance State
c. Forensic Science and Individual Rights
d. Ethical controversies

More information

LW7128 -

Comparative Law of Evidence (Core,20 Credits)

This module takes a cross-jurisdictional look at evidence in legal settings. It articulates the decision-making process in various criminal justice systems by exploring the respective normative framework for information management. Different models of proof in domestic (England and Wales) and international criminal justice systems (common law) will be reduced to their central tenets and principles of evidence and proof. Particular emphasis will be laid on the area of law at the intersection of evidence and proof. We will investigate the way in which the criminal process employs expert witnesses and critically analyse the various issues arising from the way legal officials, factfinders and scientists/forensic practitioners communicate with each other. On completion of this module, students should be able to:
• analyse and critically discuss principles of evidence law
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary debates in theoretical and empirical literature about the law of evidence
• have an independent ability to further their knowledge about, and research into, the issues arising from the topics and themes and to write about these issues in a structured and academic way.

Module topics outline

1. Introduction. What is structural analysis?
2. Criminal Trial as a decision-making process
• Principles of evidence
• Truth
• Justice
3. Features of Evidence
• Relevance
• Credibility
• Probative force
4. Standard of Proof
• Defining ‘reasonable’
• The algorithm or the story?
5. Generating and presenting evidence
• Information management
• Illegally obtained evidence
6. Expert witness testimony
• The realm of law
• The realm of science
7. The problem of validity
• Opinion Rule
• What is “helpful”?
• Deference and epistemic dependence
8. Unchallenged evidence.
• Accepting expert evidence
• Departing from expert evidence
• Unchallenged expert evidence
9. DNA
• Intelligence Databases
• Population Databases
• Logical fallacies
10. Fingerprints and Identification
11. Law & Science
• Scientific findings
• Legal decisions
12. The future of Evidence and Proof
• AI & Deep learning
• AI as source of evidence

More information

LW7129 -

Transnational Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will receive a substantive introduction in the area of transnational criminal law. The module specifically focuses on 4 key areas of transnational crime; transnational organised crime, human trafficking, cyber-crime and terrorism. You will also cover the mechanisms of state co-operation with respect to transnational crimes, such as mutual legal assistance and extradition and considers key questions in relation to jurisdiction such as the aut dedere aut judicare principle. You will also study the workings of bodies dedicated to the promotion of inter-state co-operation such as Eurojust, Europol and Interpol and to the suppression of transnational criminality within the European Union.
Outline of substantive topic areas:

? The concept of transnational crime
? International law enforcement cooperation
? Jurisdiction
? Extradition
? Transnational Organised Crime
? Human Trafficking
? Cyber-crime
? Terrorism
? Future trends

More information

LW7130 -

Theories of Punishment (Core,20 Credits)

Sentencing is a routine part of the criminal process when a defendant is convicted, yet how and why we should punish offenders remain deeply contested questions. This module introduces you to the main theories of punishment, exploring retributive and consequentialist justifications for punishment, as well as theories which combine elements of both. You will consider moral responsibility and explore how debates about free will and determinism, along with recent developments in neuroscience, impact on theorising about punishment. You will also learn about the impact of technology on punishment, such as the use of algorithms in calculating risk of reoffending at the sentencing stage. You will then explore ethical issues relating to two widely used, yet controversial, forms of punishment: imprisonment and capital punishment. The latter part of the module will explore alternative approaches to punishment, such as restorative justice and welfare-based interventions. Arguments for the abolition of punishment will also be considered.

Outline of seminar topics:
1. Retributive punishment
2. Consequentialist punishment
3. Mixed theories of punishment
4. Moral responsibility and punishment: the free will debate
5. Technology and punishment
6. The ethics of imprisonment
7. The ethics of capital punishment
8. Alternative approaches (1): restorative justice
9. Alternative approaches (2): child welfare; mental health treatment.
10. Arguments for abolition

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

LW7088 -

Research for Advanced Legal Studies (Core,20 Credits)

This module offers a critical introduction to legal research methods. It is designed to ensure that you will be able to confidently embark on legal research on your Masters programme whatever your academic background or jurisdiction. Your lectures are designed to refresh and develop your understanding of legal research techniques, referencing and evaluating sources. In your workshops you will be provided with opportunities to undertake and obtain feedback upon a series of legal research and writing tasks, thus enabling you to develop critical understanding of what it meant by effective legal research, and how you yourself can become an effective legal researcher.

More information

LW7089 -

Legal Research Project (LLM Framework) (Core,60 Credits)

In this module you will draw on your skills and knowledge acquired from the taught elements of the LLM branch specialism and will develop and refine these in the context of a self-chosen area of independent specialist study. You will develop; (1) your understanding and use of legal research techniques, (2) An ability to critically analyse and evaluate legal data, (3) the ability to handle complex legal material systematically and creatively including material at the forefront of the field of study, (4) a conceptual understanding of the research topic, (5) skill at showing a systematic understanding of knowledge and a critical awareness of current legal issues, (6) the ability to communicate legal information, arguments and conclusions within accepted academic conventions.

More information

LW7126 -

Youth Justice (Core,20 Credits)

Youth crime and justice is an area which continuously attracts political, legal and media attention with the ‘youth problem’ dominating headlines in recent years. However, youth crime is not a new phenomenon. This module explores the nature and extent of youth crime within England and Wales as well as introducing you to approaches to youth crime on an international level. The module will examine youth justice in its historical context and how the youth justice system has adapted over time as well as providing an overview of children and young people’s rights in the context of crime and criminal justice. The youth justice system will be outlined in the context of analysing approaches to youth justice policy, where you will look at current legislation and the roles and responsibilities that statutory partners have with young offenders in the youth justice system. The sentencing systems for young offenders, and the role of the youth court, will also be considered, as well as exploring the law and practice of diversion. The module will also provide you with an insight into the relevance of restorative justice as a response to youth offending as well as exploring current concerns surrounding gender, race and disproportionality that effect some young offenders.

Course Topics Outline
1. The nature and extent of youth crime & The aetiological explanations for youth crime
2. Historical, sociological and legal conceptions of childhood
3. Rights of the Child
4. Age of Criminal Responsibility & Doli Incapax
5. Approaches to Youth Justice Policy
6. Responsibilities of Statutory Partners to Young Offenders.
7. The Law and practice of Diversion
8. Sentencing options available to the Youth Court
9. Alternative approaches to Youth Justice - Restorative Justice (Theory and practice)
10. Approaches to youth crime in comparative jurisdictions
11. Welfare of Young Offenders
12. Race, Gender and Disproportionality

More information

LW7127 -

Criminal Justice and Forensic Science (Core,20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to theories of justice, principles of criminal law, and criminal justice theory as well as practice. It will proceed to critically examine the criminal process of England and Wales, and in particular, the institutions of criminal justice and forensic science. The module will finish with a study of social and ethical implications of the criminal process, and international trends. On completion of this module, you should be able to:
• analyse and critically discuss criminal justice processes with respect to the cultures and ethics of the criminal law;
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary debates in theoretical and empirical literature about the relevant criminal justice and forensic institutions and their practices which form part of the forensic processes relevant to criminal justice so that they can state policies and laws with accuracy;
• have an independent ability to further their knowledge about, and research into, the issues arising from the topics and themes and to write about these issues in a structured and academic way.
Module topics outline

1. Introduction
2. Justice and principles of criminal law
3. Criminal justice theory
4. Criminal justice – institutions and the ‘system’.
a. The Police and ‘policing’
b. Prosecution and the courts
c. Reforming the CJS.
5. Forensic Science and the Criminal Justice System
a. Introduction to Forensic Process
b. What is/ are forensic science(s)? Who are forensic scientists?
c. The Forensic Science ‘marketplace’
6. The Criminal Investigation
a. Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation.
b. Forensic Identification Technologies & Processes
c. Police powers
7. DNA, Fingerprints and Identification
a. Fingerprints and DNA in the ‘Fight Against Crime’
b. Developments in DNA science & dactyloscopy
c. Resolving DNA controversies & reforming fingerprinting
8. Forensic Databases
a. Development of Forensic Identity Databases
b. Other forensic databases
9. Medical Aspects of the Forensic Process
a. Forensic Medical Examiners ('police surgeons')
b. Forensic pathologists
c. Coroners (pre and post-Shipman).
10. Criminal Appeals & Miscarriages of Justice
a. Forensic science as cause of miscarriages
b. DNA and Exonerating the Innocent
c. The Regulation of Forensic science
11. International Trends in Criminal Justice and Forensic Science
a. The international utility of forensic identification
b. International ‘standards’ & exchange
c. Trans-national forensic databases: The Future?
12. Criminal Justice and Forensic Science: Social and Ethical Issues
a. Criminalisation
b. The surveillance State
c. Forensic Science and Individual Rights
d. Ethical controversies

More information

LW7128 -

Comparative Law of Evidence (Core,20 Credits)

This module takes a cross-jurisdictional look at evidence in legal settings. It articulates the decision-making process in various criminal justice systems by exploring the respective normative framework for information management. Different models of proof in domestic (England and Wales) and international criminal justice systems (common law) will be reduced to their central tenets and principles of evidence and proof. Particular emphasis will be laid on the area of law at the intersection of evidence and proof. We will investigate the way in which the criminal process employs expert witnesses and critically analyse the various issues arising from the way legal officials, factfinders and scientists/forensic practitioners communicate with each other. On completion of this module, students should be able to:
• analyse and critically discuss principles of evidence law
• demonstrate knowledge and understanding of contemporary debates in theoretical and empirical literature about the law of evidence
• have an independent ability to further their knowledge about, and research into, the issues arising from the topics and themes and to write about these issues in a structured and academic way.

Module topics outline

1. Introduction. What is structural analysis?
2. Criminal Trial as a decision-making process
• Principles of evidence
• Truth
• Justice
3. Features of Evidence
• Relevance
• Credibility
• Probative force
4. Standard of Proof
• Defining ‘reasonable’
• The algorithm or the story?
5. Generating and presenting evidence
• Information management
• Illegally obtained evidence
6. Expert witness testimony
• The realm of law
• The realm of science
7. The problem of validity
• Opinion Rule
• What is “helpful”?
• Deference and epistemic dependence
8. Unchallenged evidence.
• Accepting expert evidence
• Departing from expert evidence
• Unchallenged expert evidence
9. DNA
• Intelligence Databases
• Population Databases
• Logical fallacies
10. Fingerprints and Identification
11. Law & Science
• Scientific findings
• Legal decisions
12. The future of Evidence and Proof
• AI & Deep learning
• AI as source of evidence

More information

LW7129 -

Transnational Criminal Law (Core,20 Credits)

You will receive a substantive introduction in the area of transnational criminal law. The module specifically focuses on 4 key areas of transnational crime; transnational organised crime, human trafficking, cyber-crime and terrorism. You will also cover the mechanisms of state co-operation with respect to transnational crimes, such as mutual legal assistance and extradition and considers key questions in relation to jurisdiction such as the aut dedere aut judicare principle. You will also study the workings of bodies dedicated to the promotion of inter-state co-operation such as Eurojust, Europol and Interpol and to the suppression of transnational criminality within the European Union.
Outline of substantive topic areas:

? The concept of transnational crime
? International law enforcement cooperation
? Jurisdiction
? Extradition
? Transnational Organised Crime
? Human Trafficking
? Cyber-crime
? Terrorism
? Future trends

More information

LW7130 -

Theories of Punishment (Core,20 Credits)

Sentencing is a routine part of the criminal process when a defendant is convicted, yet how and why we should punish offenders remain deeply contested questions. This module introduces you to the main theories of punishment, exploring retributive and consequentialist justifications for punishment, as well as theories which combine elements of both. You will consider moral responsibility and explore how debates about free will and determinism, along with recent developments in neuroscience, impact on theorising about punishment. You will also learn about the impact of technology on punishment, such as the use of algorithms in calculating risk of reoffending at the sentencing stage. You will then explore ethical issues relating to two widely used, yet controversial, forms of punishment: imprisonment and capital punishment. The latter part of the module will explore alternative approaches to punishment, such as restorative justice and welfare-based interventions. Arguments for the abolition of punishment will also be considered.

Outline of seminar topics:
1. Retributive punishment
2. Consequentialist punishment
3. Mixed theories of punishment
4. Moral responsibility and punishment: the free will debate
5. Technology and punishment
6. The ethics of imprisonment
7. The ethics of capital punishment
8. Alternative approaches (1): restorative justice
9. Alternative approaches (2): child welfare; mental health treatment.
10. Arguments for abolition

More information

Any Questions?

Our admissions team will be happy to help. They can be contacted on 0191 406 0901.

Contact Details for Applicants:

bc.applicantservices@northumbria.ac.uk

Current, Relevant and Inspiring

We continuously review and improve course content in consultation with our students and employers. To make sure we can inform you of any changes to your course register for updates on the course page.

Your Learning Experience find out about our distinctive approach at 
www.northumbria.ac.uk/exp

Admissions Terms and Conditions - northumbria.ac.uk/terms
Fees and Funding - northumbria.ac.uk/fees
Admissions Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/adpolicy
Admissions Complaints Policy - northumbria.ac.uk/complaints

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If you're a UK/EU student and would like to know more about our courses, you can order a copy of our prospectus here.

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* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

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Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

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