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Are you keen to build your skills in research, analysis and reporting to an advanced level by exploring ways in which we interact with and interpret the world around us? MGeog Human Geography takes a critical and theoretically informed approach to a range of applied topics that underpin an understanding of human geography.

Geog _accred (1)

Drawing on cutting-edge geographical research, this integrated master’s course incorporates a diverse range of specialist topics including social exclusion, migration, sustainable development, creative industries, housing, urban regeneration and planning.

Your first year will incorporate a broader understanding of the subject area of geography, with a specific focus on human geography for the remainder of your course. From the second year of your course, you can tailor your options to meet your own personal learning and career goals. This includes significant opportunities for independent research projects in your final two years. 

Throughout the duration of this course you will have the opportunity to utilise our industry-leading facilities, in addition to undertaking UK and overseas fieldtrips to provide invaluable experience in applying conceptual and methodological aspects of your learning.

There is also the opportunity to follow a specified pathway through the course to receive a degree with partial accreditation from the Charted Institute of Housing.

90% of students agreed that they got sufficient advice and support and that staff are good at explaining things (Unistats, 2016)

Are you keen to build your skills in research, analysis and reporting to an advanced level by exploring ways in which we interact with and interpret the world around us? MGeog Human Geography takes a critical and theoretically informed approach to a range of applied topics that underpin an understanding of human geography.

Geog _accred (1)

Drawing on cutting-edge geographical research, this integrated master’s course incorporates a diverse range of specialist topics including social exclusion, migration, sustainable development, creative industries, housing, urban regeneration and planning.

Your first year will incorporate a broader understanding of the subject area of geography, with a specific focus on human geography for the remainder of your course. From the second year of your course, you can tailor your options to meet your own personal learning and career goals. This includes significant opportunities for independent research projects in your final two years. 

Throughout the duration of this course you will have the opportunity to utilise our industry-leading facilities, in addition to undertaking UK and overseas fieldtrips to provide invaluable experience in applying conceptual and methodological aspects of your learning.

There is also the opportunity to follow a specified pathway through the course to receive a degree with partial accreditation from the Charted Institute of Housing.

90% of students agreed that they got sufficient advice and support and that staff are good at explaining things (Unistats, 2016)

Course Information

UCAS Code
L7T6

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
4 years full-time or 5 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Geography and Environmental Sciences

Location
Ellison Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Geography and Environmental Sciences

Book an Open Day / Experience Human Geography (MGeog)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Human Geography. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

On completion of this course you will have an advanced understanding of geography and be able to appreciate the value of a human geographic perspective in the analysis of real world problems.

Teaching is delivered via a range of methods including tutorials, seminars, workshops, group projects, lectures, guest speakers, visits and fieldwork.

Residential, full day and half day fieldtrips form an integral part of this course’s delivery, reinforcing classroom learning and allowing you to apply your knowledge in a real-world and international context.

To prepare you for your future career, the MGeog Human Geography course is assessed through a range of strategies that help you to develop new skills which include GIS, visualisation, geophotography, reflexive practice and presentation skills. Other forms of assessment include extended essays, field reports, group projects, research projects and exams. There are also many opportunities to develop and practise hands-on skills through student-led assignments.

Staff operate an open door policy allowing you easy access to the team and provide regular feedback on all assessed work.

Book an Open Day / Experience Human Geography (MGeog)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Human Geography. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

When you join the MGeog Human Geography course you will be taught by our research-active academic team who combine their vast subject knowledge with high quality teaching and support.

All of our teaching team hold doctorates or extensive experience in their respective fields. They are experts in a broad range of specialisms including migration, labour and identity; austerity and inequalities; ‘race’ and racism, environmental justice; mobilities and environmental issues; urban regeneration; tourism, ageing and retirement migration; rural change; low-carbon lifestyles; geographies of crime; everyday b/ordering; emotional geographies; feminist methodologies and creative industries.

All of our staff are approachable, enthusiastic and committed to your learning experience, supporting you through every step of your degree.

You will also benefit from our academics’ partnerships and memberships with professional bodies and relationships established with third party organisations.

Book an Open Day / Experience Human Geography (MGeog)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Human Geography. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Northumbria University boasts industry-leading facilities to enhance your learning experience throughout the duration of your degree.

Our campus encompasses a range of learning spaces specifically designed to allow you to get up close and learn using state-of-the-art equipment and software. This includes a Qualitative Research Suite, social spaces and a dedicated resource centre and learning space for geographers - The Hub. Other on-site facilities include The Zone, which is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Throughout your course you will undertake individual and group projects, visiting a variety of regional, national and international locations to learn and practice investigative field work methods. Project work will also allow you to explore and reflect on issues ranging from globalisation to housing. 

Facilities / Geography and Environmental Sciences

Take a look at the facilities for the Geography and Environmental Sciences.

Virtual Tour

Come and explore our outstanding facilities in this interactive virtual tour.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Human Geography (MGeog)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Human Geography. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

All of our teaching team are experts in their respective fields and their research is used to unite the theoretical aspects of the course with a strong practical and applied focus. We have two active Research Groups: ‘Social and Cultural Geographies’ and ‘Disaster, Development and Resilience’. Our academics are research-active, publishing cutting-edge work within academia and contributing to policy debates, civic life and business. Incorporating this research into an active learning environment is at the forefront of our teaching strategy, allowing you to participate in debates that are defining the discipline, with those directly involved in shaping change.

This course places an emphasis on both the development of individual research skills and the importance of group work, and by the end of your course you will possess the skills required to position yourself as a confident researcher.

When you choose your undergraduate and integrated masters research projects you will have access to an academic who is closely aligned to your area of specialism to ensure you have access to skills and knowledge that are at the forefront of your subject.

55% of the Geography department’s research was ranked as world-leading or internationally excellent, making us a top-30 Geography Research Department based on research power (REF2014).

Research / Geography and Environmental Sciences

From Antarctica to the Arctic, global warming to disaster risk reduction, Geography takes place at a truly global scale at Northumbria. Research in this department is focused in five groups: Cold and Palaeo Environments; Social and Cultural Geographies; Disasters, Development and Resilience; Environmental Geochemistry and Ecology; and the Northumbrian Environmental Training and Research Centre.

Book an Open Day / Experience Human Geography (MGeog)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Human Geography. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Geography is recognised as being one of the most employable of subjects (RGS, 2011) and throughout the duration of this course you will have the opportunity to enhance your career edge through the completion of work placements, study abroad, work on live projects and initiatives and assessments based on real-world scenarios.

Employability is embedded throughout this course from induction and some of the skills you will learn include visual presentation, writing skills, Geographic Information Systems (GIS), IT, data analysis, critical thinking, numeracy and problem solving. All of which will enhance your employability and boost your self-confidence.

Our geography courses have been designed to meet the changes and developments across a range of employment sectors to ensure you leave equipped with all the relevant skills and expertise required to pursue a career of your choice.

You will leave this course equipped to examine economic, political, social and environmental issues to develop an informed concern about the Earth and its people to an advanced level.

As your course progresses your modules will become more applied, often using live case study material or linking with outside organisations, a task which in many cases will require you to develop relationships with external organisations.

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Exprience Human Geography (MGeog)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Human Geography. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

On completion of this course you will have an in-depth understanding of human geography and appreciate the value of a geographic-centred analysis of contemporary global change. You will leave prepared for professional employment or further study through the development and practice of a portfolio of transferrable skills.

Graduates may choose to pursue a diverse range of specialist roles, including careers within planning, teaching, the civil service, charities, geographical data analysis, environment and renewable energy sectors. Graduates may also move into graduate training programmes or jobs within charities or local and national Government.  

Northumbria University boasts strong links with employers regionally and nationally and our graduates are highly valued by employers thanks to our leading facilities and the reputation of our teaching team.

Book an Open Day / Experience Human Geography (MGeog)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Human Geography. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Your course in brief

Year 1

Year one This year is about introducing you to geography at university level, and providing you with foundational skills upon which you will build your degree and career. You will learn core geographical and environmental concepts, develop new study and research skills, and go on residential visits to collect research data and to get to know fellow staff and students.

Year 2

Year two This year is where you begin to focus your studies on areas which interest you most, practice and develop new skills and gain a deeper insight into how human geography helps explain the world around us. Students get to choose between a selection of exciting modules listed in the module overview section.

Year 3

Year three (Optional year) You will go out on industrial placement to put the skills you have learned in the previous modules into professional practice, or on study abroad.

Year 4

Year four The fourth year is where students explore the latest research in human geography by pushing the boundaries of the discipline itself. You will research and complete a dissertation related to an area of your choice, and it is common for this research to be used by stakeholders beyond the university including other academics, policy-makers, charities and businesses.

Year 5

Year five Your final year will be your Masters-level year, when you can choose to explore, in-depth, areas of human geography, such as sustainable development, housing and heath, and partnerships and regeneration.

Who would this Course suit?

Want to understand how and why the world is changing? Would you like to distinguish yourself from the crowd and take your passion for human geography to master’s level? This course could be for you.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels 

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit 

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher 

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB to include

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

You are expected to purchase waterproofs, an approximate cost would be £150. Walking boots are also highly recommended, an approximate cost would be £100. There are optional field trips you may wish to attend; an approximate cost would be £150. Optional Modules where you are expected to have DBS clearance will incur a mandatory charge of approximately £50. Other optional modules carry mandatory costs for field trips and as a guide would range in cost from approximately £200-£500. If you choose to do a dissertation that requires digital/secondary data modelling or a locally based case study there will be no charge; however if you chooses to do a UK based fieldtrip for their dissertation it may cost approximately £350; if an overseas based field trip is chosen it may cost significantly more.

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

If you'd like to receive news and information from us in the future about the course or finance then please complete the below form

* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KE4000 -

Introduction to the Physical Environment (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn a broad range of basic concepts and principles of the physical environment, how these interact as part of the Earth System and are modified by human processes. As you explore the Earth System today and in the past, you will discover a diverse range of atmospheric, land based and oceanic components that together form the physical environment. Armed with this knowledge you will be able to begin to critically evaluate the evidence concerning processes, landforms and systems. This will develop your problem solving skills and give you an international holistic view on the Earth as a system. Topics include:
• Atmospheric processes and energy flows.
• Climate and climate change.
• Weathering and Erosion.
• Soils and soil forming processes.
• Glacial and periglacial environments and the processes that shape these.
• Landscape and landform evolution from hillslope processes, to rivers and the coastal environment.
• The biogeographical distribution of vegetation and biomes
• The role of the biosphere in the Earth system and ecosystem engineers.
• How the Earth system has changed over Quaternary and Cenozoic time scales.
• The physical environment and links to human health.

More information

KE4001 -

Introduction to Human Geography (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about contemporary human geography and this will provide a firm and wide-ranging foundation/framework for more detailed study in human geographies at levels 5 and 6. It will help you to appreciate the broad variety of issues and concepts within contemporary human geography, whilst encouraging you to make informed and critical judgements upon issues of human geographic importance and relevance. You will be introduced to forms of explanation in human geography and the manner in which geographers have interpreted a variety of social, cultural, political and economic phenomena. You will develop global knowledge and an understanding of international perspectives. Topics explored are some of the major issues facing the earth and its peoples today including: poverty and social exclusion, geographies of difference and inequality, population movements and the geo-political tensions around state borders in a global world, economic change and the geographical consequences of a global financial service sector and the rise of the knowledge economy.

More information

KE4003 -

Geography Fieldwork (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn that fieldwork is an essential and characteristic aspect of geography and you will learn how to conduct physical geography fieldwork or a combination of physical and human and geography fieldwork, depending on your programme of study. Fieldwork is a form of experiential learning which contributes to your curiosity and enquiry about human and/or physical environments. You will carry this out by developing discerning observation and measurement of physical aspects of your environment recognising the importance of scale. You will understand the evolution and significance of the distinctiveness of places and environments including glaciated landscapes and you will be made aware of different approaches to their interpretation. In the BA and BSc programmes you will gain a parallel understanding of the role of spatial linkages in social and physical processes. You will be given opportunities to practise methods and strategies of field research in human and/or physical geography such as observing the impacts of geomorphological processes and conducting human geography enquiries. You will be encouraged to take a critical view of the challenges and opportunities of field-based research and will learn how to use and apply appropriate field based equipment and technologies. You will take responsibility for your learning and reflection upon that learning and you will recognise the moral, ethical and safety issues involved in all aspects of geographical enquiry. In this module you will learn how to work in groups and you will gain problem solving and presentation skills.

More information

KE4004 -

Academic Skills and Personal Development (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module, you will learn and develop the key intellectual skills and personal attributes required for effective study and future graduate employment. Teaching, learning and assessment activities are tailored towards your own degree programme, linking to substantive core modules, thus providing an appropriate subject context for your studies. The module aims to consolidate the process of induction onto your degree programme, thus supporting your transition from further to higher education. As part of this shift in academic culture, you will be encouraged to take increasing responsibility for your own learning and through the development of reflective practice, develop ways of monitoring your own academic performance and progress. Topics and issues covered include:
? Independent study and time management.
? Effective literature searching.
? Reading and summarising academic literature.
? Referencing, citations and plagiarism.
? Marking schemes and expectations.
? Essay writing skills.
? Report writing skills.
? Exam preparation.
? Oral presentation and debating skills.
? Dissecting a peer-reviewed journal article.
? Effective group work.
? Skills evaluation and reflection.
? CV preparation and employability skills.

More information

KE4005 -

Exploring Geographical and Environmental Data (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module, you will learn to explore and analyse a wide range of geographical and environmental data. You will engage in teaching, learning and assessment activities, which are generic to all students of geography and environmental science, as well as specific tasks tailored towards your own degree programme. The module aims to give you a broad introduction to data collection and analysis in the geographical and environmental sciences, which will form the basis of programme-specific training at levels 5 and 6 and future graduate employment. Topics and issues covered include:
• sources of geographical and environmental data;
• descriptive and inferential statistics;
• geographical information systems;
• qualitative data collection and analysis.

More information

KE4009 -

Geographies of Development (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about why global development has been uneven, what the consequences are and what has been done to address uneven development. We will begin by examining concepts of development and theories and models of development (e.g. modernisation, dependency, neo-liberalism and postcolonialism). This will provide a contextual foundation to explore other themes and issues which may include:
• Development organisations and their roles (e.g. NGOs, donors, multilateral agencies, the World Bank, the state etc)
• Key historical processes and interventions (e.g. colonialism, the debt crisis, structural adjustment, MDGs, SDGs)
• Approaches in development (e.g. basic needs, participation and empowerment)
• Population and development
• Property rights, the tragedy of the commons and development
• Urbanisation and rural development
• Gender and development
• Tourism and development
• Poverty and inequality, livelihoods, vulnerability and resilience
Through the use of case studies you will learn what uneven development means in a range of empirical contexts in the global South.

The skills developed on this module (particularly during the second semester include both self-management and working effectively as part of a group; the collection, analysis and presentation of secondary data; oral presentation skills).

More information

KE5023 -

Academic Language Skills for Geography (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KA5018 -

Urban Planning and Development (Optional, 20 Credits)

Planning mediates between competing interests in society and guides, shapes and regulates the use of land and property. The primary policy goal is to deliver and/or facilitate 'sustainable development'.

In this module you will explore the significance of planning in order to facilitate economic, social and environmental objectives within the development process. The module explores the nature of planning from a development perspective by engaging with policy, practical examples and key development concepts. It considers the guiding principles of planning, the statutory processes and procedural dimensions, the management of development, contemporary planning practice, key actors and agencies, synergies between planning and urban regeneration and the competing and evolving dynamics of urban development.

You will develop, throughout this module, academic and professional skills relating to the evaluation of policy; effective communication; self-direction and personal responsibility and appreciate social and ethical aspects of the development process.

More information

KE5004 -

Human Geography in the field (Andalucia) (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the ways in which Andalucia has been drawn into the global economy, initially through the growth of mass tourism during the 1960s, but more recently via increases in foreign investment in; manufacturing and services and the growth of intensive agriculture. You will also be able to study the ways in which some of these globalising forces have challenged local values and cultures. Other processes have had major consequences for the environment including the impacts on water resources and the effects of migration on land-use and patterns of farm abandonment. We will demonstrate the relationships between global and local change and the interaction between economic, political, social, cultural and environmental change in one particular region.

Within this conceptual framework, you will be mentored by a tutor to help you prepare for the field visit by developing specific projects under their supervision and direction. These research projects will be identified by staff, but you will be expected to design a method of inquiry and carry out whatever background study necessary to conduct the work while in the field. Research themes might include:
• Patterns and processes of farm de-intensification and farm abandonment
• Development of commercial forms of agriculture
• Economic change and high technology industries
• Mass-tourism development
• Heritage and destination place marketing
• Alternative tourism development
• Retirement migration and the impacts of second home ownership
• Urban change, urban morphology and redevelopment
• Modernisation of the Andalucian village

More information

KE5005 -

Approaches to Research in Human Geography (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn the processes through which research is designed, implemented and analysed. The first part of the module begins with questions of philosophy and theory, you will understand the historical development of geographical thought within human geography, and learn how we arrived at the subject’s contemporary sub-disciplines. These ontological and epistemological themes will then be linked to an evaluation of methodologies adopted in contemporary research in the social sciences. You will build a toolbox of approaches which can be applied to your own research.

In the second part of the module you will construct your own research project that will become your dissertation at level 6. Through exploration of literature, case studies and best practice from a chosen field of human geography, you will develop the ability to design innovative research questions. You will link these to an appropriate methodology and select methods suitable for your project.

More information

KE5006 -

P/political Geographies (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the importance of this sub-disciplinary area to the study of human geography, in relation to the key concepts of power and space. You will develop an in depth understanding of the spatial organisation of political institutions, governance practices, processes and agents and critically consider a range of more and less formalised political practices operating at range of geographical scales. You will also acquire important research methods skills by locating appropriate secondary qualitative data including policy and media sources and applying forms of discourse analysis. The module places particular emphasis on the following themes:
- Definitions of the ‘political’
- Globalisation and post-colonialism
- Activism and resistance
- Mobility and migration
- The nation and the state
- Citizenship
- The ‘local’ in politics
- The body and politics

More information

KE5007 -

Social Geographies (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the importance of this sub-disciplinary area to the study of human geography. You will discover the ways in which social relations, inequalities and identities are distributed and (re-)produced across space. The module places particular emphasis on:
- the welfare issues which affect people's lives
- the forms of power which lead to socio-spatial inequality and oppression
- individual and collective identities and their spatial (re-) production
- relevant methodological approaches for investigating these issues
Through this module you will also learn a number of important and transferable skills including research skills, team working, problem solving, communication skills, and the ability to use your own initiative but also to follow instructions.

More information

KE5008 -

Economic Geography (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn how to adopt and convey an economic-geographical approach to understanding the economy. You will learn about how and why economic activities and processes vary over space, and time and will recognise the importance of history in shaping these spatial manifestations. You will develop accounts of uneven spatial development in the economy based not just on the distribution of economic activities but also caused by decisions taken by a variety of key economic actors such as governments, trade unions, firms and supra-national bodies. By extension then you will learn how these actors shape and produce economic geographies. You will also become conscious of the way in which scale is an important organising principle for the distribution of economic activity and behaviour of firms as well as learning how different economic processes happen at different spatial scales. Finally, you will be equipped with the concepts and theories required to understand the world from an economic-geographical perspective.

More information

KE5016 -

Environment, Development and Sustainability (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about environmental issues in poorer countries and the relationship between the process of development and environmental change. Environmental issues such as desertification, deforestation, water scarcity, wildlife and biodiversity loss, mining and resource extraction will form the focus of the module. These will be contextualised in terms of changes in livelihoods, agriculture, governance, gender relations, population, technology, foreign investment and land ownership and poverty. Initiatives for tackling some of these problems, such as REDD+, community forestry, ecotourism, community conservation, will be critically examined. Examples will be taken at a range of scales from the local to the regional. Most material will be drawn from Africa and Asia. You will also learn some key tools that are valuable in employment in the development sector, such as stakeholder analysis, logical framework analysis and participatory research tools. Providing an opportunity to develop creative solutions to development problems in the form of project design will enhance your employability skills.

More information

KE5017 -

Earth Observation and GIS (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module is designed to teach you the concepts and techniques of spatial data handling and analysis using the techniques of remote sensing and image processing and Geographical Information Systems (GIS). Adding to the cartographic skills and basic spatial analysis that you have learnt from level 4 (first year) you will be taught to carry out spatial analysis from a wider range of sources and types of social and scientific geographical data. You will learn basic theoretical principles underpinning the use and application of digital datasets followed by more advanced techniques of image classification and spatial analysis. You will be taught how to use industry standard computer software applied in research and the workplace that will allow you to manipulate and analyse those data.

One semester focuses principally on remote sensing where you will learn in relation to image processing:
• the key components of remote sensing acquisition and analysis/display, including different platforms, sensors, image wavebands, and temporal and spatial resolution of imagery, and the fundamental processing techniques required in order to interpret remotely sensed imagery;
• theoretical background of datasets that can be generated and used to interpret change over space and time (e.g. loss of crops to disease, impact of changes in climate on food productivity and earths biomass); and
• the techniques used to classify and analyse datasets; explore spectral signatures, apply different classification models to produce landcover maps as a basis for resource management.

The other semester focuses on spatial analysis using GIS by:
• teaching you about key theoretical concepts associated with the types and associated use of digital data: what you can and can’t do to digital data in GIS, implications of scale on analysis, error (what is it, why it matters and what can be done about it) geographical co-ordinate systems and georeferencing;
• teaching you about the GIS tool box and different methods of spatial analysis available to you including the third dimension – 3D analysis using digital elevation models; and
• teaching you the practical skills you need to interrogate and analyse data in order to answer spatial queries – geographical decision making for policy and practice.

More information

KE5020 -

Human geography fieldwork:UK (Optional, 20 Credits)

The module seeks to demonstrate the relationships between global and local change and the interaction between economic, political, social, cultural and environmental change in one particular locality.
Within this conceptual framework, you will be mentored by a tutor to help you prepare for the field visit by developing specific projects under their supervision and direction. These research projects will be identified by staff, but you will be expected to design a method of inquiry and carry out whatever background study necessary to conduct the work while in the field. Research themes might include:
• Rural development and agricultural change
• Economic change and cultural industries
• Heritage and destination place marketing
• Rural tourism development
• Urban change, urban morphology and redevelopment

More information

KE5023 -

Academic Language Skills for Geography (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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TE5507 -

Student Tutoring (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn how to be a tutor of students in schools or colleges. You will develop your skills in communicating effectively with children or young people. As part of this process you will learn how to evaluate your own learning of how to support these pupils’ learning over a series of lessons. You will be learning how to transmit your own enthusiasm for learning in a professional context to pupils within the schooling system. You will learn about the issues facing teachers and other professionals within the school, college or learning centre. Learning how to apply your existing skills and knowledge in a work related context will be an important focus of this module for you. Knowing how to determine which skills and knowledge are relevant, and make appropriate use of these in the work context, will be a major learning opportunity for you.

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KA5029 -

International Academic Exchange 1 (Optional, 60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one semester as part of your programme.

This is a 60 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad semester will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as an additional 60 credits for Engineering and Environment Study Abroad Semester.

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KA5030 -

International Academic Exchange 2 (Optional, 120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

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KE5023 -

Academic Language Skills for Geography (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KF5000 -

Engineering and Environment Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

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KF5001 -

Engineering and Environment Work Placement Semester (Optional, 60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one semester work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the placement is recognised both in your transcript as a 60 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 20 weeks.

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KA6040 -

Housing, Space and Society (Optional, 20 Credits)

Following the exploration of key theoretical perspectives on housing, space and society you will learn about how ideological, economic and social influences shape the production and reproduction of the residential built environment. You will analyse how and why tenure structure in the United Kingdom has changed over time. You will critically review and evaluate the impact of housing policies in determining spatial and residential outcomes. To support this you will study the following topics:

• The role of location and space in housing
• The contested meaning of house and home
• Housing policy, the development of the residential built environment and socio-geographical phenomena
• Changing tenure structures
o Market housing – owner occupation and the private rented sector
o Social housing – council housing and housing associations
• Disadvantaged neighbourhoods
• Inter and intra-regional housing market trends
• Housing affordability and social exclusion
• Housing policy and the impact on social groups
• Housing and contemporary policy issues.

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KE5023 -

Academic Language Skills for Geography (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KE6000 -

Geography and Environment Dissertation (Core, 40 Credits)

This module is designed to support you in independently pursuing an original piece of research on a geographical or environmental topic of your own choice grounded in final year specialist option modules. Dependent upon your programme of study, you will draw upon and develop your research skills in answering research questions/hypothesis on a dissertation topic within the social, humanities, natural and environmental disciplines. You will develop expertise in:

• identifying a suitable topic and in reviewing critically the relevant academic literature;
• formulating research questions/hypotheses and appropriate methods of inquiry;
• collecting your own data and/or using existing data sets and/or engaging in an analysis of the research literature;
• the ability to analyse and interpret your results using appropriate quantitative, statistical and/or qualitative techniques,
• relating the findings to existing and up-to-date literature;
• oral, visual and written presentation of your research project;
• objectively appraising the ethical considerations of conducting research; and
• managing and implementing a large independent project.

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KE6004 -

Bordering, Governance and Belonging (Optional, 20 Credits)

Controlling national borders has acquired a political and emotional poignancy that they have not had since the end of the Cold War or even earlier. After decades in which the importance – or even existence – of borders were seen as waning in a world increasingly dominated by the rise of globalisation – economic, cultural, political (Hudson, 1998; Wonders, 2006), re-bordering states has become a symbol of resistance to pressures emanating out of neo-liberal globalisation. Borderings, as the dynamic and shifting multi-scalar, multi-level spatial and virtual processes which construct, reproduce and contest borders, play, therefore, central roles in a variety of local, regional and global political projects of governance and belonging, determining individual and collective entitlements and duties as well as social cohesion and solidarity. In this module, you will explore how geographers and other social scientists have conceptualised these ‘bordering processes’ and examine in-depth case studies of re-bordering from across the globe. You will also reflect upon your own positioning in relation to the underpinning political projects of governance and belonging.

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KE6005 -

Geographies of (P)leisure, Tolerance and Disgust (Amsterdam) (Optional, 20 Credits)

As the title suggests, on this module you will learn about the inter-relationships between notions of pleasure, tolerance and disgust, together with geographies of difference, inclusion and exclusion, order and disorder, and the social and cultural construction of boundaries in western society. The module relates anthropological and psychoanalytical theory to the social and spatial exclusion of minority groups. In particular we will focuse on the social construction different spaces as sites of inclusion, exclusion and social conflict. It is delivered through a combination of lectures, videos, discussions and seminars, alongside a compulsory, self-financed field-trip to Amsterdam. Primarily you will also learn a lot about yourself on this module but particularly how you construct and negotiate difference and otherness in your everyday life. You will also develop your ability to apply your disciplinary knowledge to some quite complex social problems (e.g. the regulation of sex work) in the real world and explore a range of alternative solutions which are practical and socially justifiable.

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KE6007 -

Geographies of 'race', ethnicity and multiculture (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the politics and geographies of identity and difference with specific reference to racial and ethnic identities at a range of scales and in a variety of contexts. You will discover how social relations are impacted by racial and ethnic identities through space and place, and how such identities intersect with other social axes such as migration, citizenship status, gender, class and age in different ways. The module places particular emphasis on:
- Histories of racialisation
- Whiteness
- ‘Race’ and racism
- Identity (re)construction
- The role of place in contextualising identities
- Contemporary migration and belonging
- Social policy
- Everyday multiculturalism
You will also learn a range of skills including the ability to analyse processes and experiences in relation to a range of theoretical approaches, to abstract, synthesise and evaluate a range of source material and to develop an appreciation of your own positionality through reflexive and reflective learning.

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KE6009 -

Critical Economic Development Studies (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about contemporary debates about geographies of the economy at local, regional, national and global scales. You will gain insight into a range of topics including the role of localities and regions in the face of globalisation; definitions and approaches to economic development; contemporary economic geography theories and how they relate to ‘real world’ case studies; the interplay between different agents in economic development processes; and the power relations inherent in, and that emerge from economic activity and policy at a range of scales.

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KE6016 -

Geophotography (Optional, 20 Credits)

The module is structured into two parts. The first term lectures and workshops will equip you with a visual understanding and practical methods, including graphics packages, critical visual methodologies, cartography and zine making. You will explore challenging contemporary ideas in geography around theoretical understandings of the visual. The second half of the module is primarily driven by your critical visual practice as you research and create on your project for the end of module exhibition. This will be supported by tutorials and crits providing sustained formative feedback. The module finishes with a public exhibition of your work. The experience of practiced based learning and public exhibition of work is designed to boost your self-confidence and develop novel skills supporting future career development

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KE6017 -

Development and Disasters (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about relationships between development and disasters to be able to analyse and respond to environmental and other catastrophes impacting on society, including through knowledge of their physical environmental, political and economic contexts. The way that disasters can be prevented, their impact on people reduced and relief and recovery better provided post disaster forms an applied focus to this module. Examples used include major hazards of environmental change, economic instability and conflict that disrupt human well-being over brief or long time-frames. The module addresses the challenges and solutions prevalent in practice and policy environments for those engaging with the development and disaster reduction sector. The content of this module is partly linked to work in this field through Northumbria’s ongoing facilitation of a global disaster and development network. The module teaches that although hazards, risks and disasters impact society, this is offset by individuals, groups, institutions and organizations through disaster management, and by becoming resilient, healthy and creative. Examples demonstrate the application of theory to practice in these relationships in both the economically wealthy and poorer parts of the world. Detailed approaches within this framework include early warning systems, risk management, mitigation techniques, response and recovery actions as well as more appropriate forms of sustainable development action. The module draws from an interdisciplinary perspective making it suitable for those progressing from, or interested in pursuing physical environmental, economic or social aspects of development and disasters. The knowledge and skills learnt can be applied to careers in this field.

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KE6018 -

Advanced Geospatial Applications (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the design and implementation of geospatial Applications using evidence based practice extending practical knowledge of the techniques and analysis tools gained from level 5 (Second year). This will involve you critically reviewing existing published and adopted practice in topic areas such as:
• environmental planning,
• landcover change,
• resource management and
• risk assessment.
in order to design, cost and implement your own geospatial application. You will be taught advanced concepts of method design and how
to cost and respond to a tender request. You will also learn advanced IT skills on data compilation, download, generation, analysis, interpretation and presentation within the context of ‘fitness of use’ using image processing and GIS software. As you explore evidence based practice you will be asked to design your application with key consideration to the following questions. Can geospatial Applications be:
• value free and what role does positionality and ethics play?,
• simply sticks which powerful groups in decision making processes use to beat smaller groups with?, and
• a key determinant of planning and policy success in an organisational context?

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KE5023 -

Academic Language Skills for Geography (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KE7004 -

Themes in Sustainable Development (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about contemporary debates in Sustainable Development from so-called developed and developing world perspectives. This serves as an essential foundation to learning about disasters and their relationship to development. The module starts by covering concepts, interpretations and principles of sustainable development. We will look at the global institutions, conferences and landmark contributions to the sustainability debate (policy and practice). You will then focus on the developing world to learn about approaches to poverty alleviation, livelihood enhancement and natural resource management. Some conceptual frameworks in this field will be covered in depth. Finally the module explores the problems in urban industrial societies.

This module provides an excellent foundation to employment in the development sector, for example by enabling you to better understand the different roles of various organisations and sectors in the development process. Providing an opportunity to develop the key skills of giving oral presentations and writing a logical, reasoned argument as well as applying theory to practice will prove valuable in terms of enhancing employability.

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KE7006 -

Health and Well-being in Disaster and Development (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn approaches to physical, psychological, social, political, economic, cultural and environmental aspects of health and well-being associated with immediate crises and longer-term health burdens. This lays foundations for comparing and contrasting strategic policy for preparedness and responses to emergent health hazards, complex political disasters, resilient health care and ways of looking at communities and the socio-economic, political, psychological and environmental characteristics they exhibit. This agenda is based on a demand to understand the nature and context of changes in human health and well-being in response to local and global crisis. It provides grounding in applied principles and practices of health and well-being centred disaster risk reduction and health care relative to conceptions of ‘health and well-being’ in emergency’, and transformations, bottom-up capabilities, leadership and hopes from inside and outside a community. Critical issues in both minority and majority worlds are examined either in terms of health hazards, vulnerability, resilience, coping, individual and institutional health care and societal responses and in terms of a virtual or real project in community well-being. These central themes, which are adjustable to most health and well-being phenomena, are addressed for the cases of infectious disease, nutrition, mental health and well-being, primary and emergency health care systems, the political economy of care, self-care, one health and other integrated well-being perspectives. A prime purpose of the module is that students from varied backgrounds will be equipped to contribute to policy and practice debates or health disaster avoidance, survivability and sustainable well-being.

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KE7010 -

Housing and Health (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn how each of us relates to our place of residence by looking at the distinction between a house, a home and the context of society/community and how stressors conceptually apply across. In the first half of the module you will explore UK housing policy, construction and the risk based approach to assessing health impact through the application to a real world property of the Housing Health and Safety Rating System (HHSRS under the Housing Act 2004). In the second part of the module you will look beyond individual properties and to a community/societal context to housing and support. With the inclusion of external lecturers from practice you will gain an understanding of the application of the law to housing needs.

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KE7016 -

Integrated Masters Research Project (Core, 60 Credits)

This module is designed to support you to develop and apply advanced academic and/or practice-based research skills within the context of an appropriate area of contemporary geographical research, grounded in/informed by staff research. You will be allocated a project supervisor who will provide you with 1:1 guidance on your research project.
You will develop expertise in:
• Planning, developing and executing a substantial piece of independent research.
• Evaluating and applying concepts, models and theories to consolidate and extend your knowledge in your chosen field of study.
• Sourcing, reviewing and synthesising a variety of information sources.
• Gathering, analysing and presenting complex data.
• Effective written, verbal and visual communication to a variety of audiences.
• Applying creative and innovative approaches to problem solving.
• Reviewing appropriate ethical, health and safety, commercial and/or confidential data protection issues associated with your research.

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KE7023 -

Geographies of B/Ordering: European Field Trip (Core, 20 Credits)

You will be given the opportunity for advanced exploration into a particular subject area of interest within human geography. The nature of this subject area will be subject to negotiation and discussion with your tutor. This will enable you to further develop your ability to derive information from the literature and to critically review relevant publications. It will also help you in the development of skills required to outline and design a research proposal and to potentially establish the theoretical and conceptual basis for your research project module. In addition you will learn apply some of the concepts and theories to a ‘real world’ case study through the flexible fieldtrip, where exercises will be tailored to your specific interests.

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KE7024 -

Partnership and Regeneration (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will explore the key concepts of social exclusion, sustainable communities, partnership working and community empowerment. These key concepts provide an analytical framework within which you can evaluate policies and initiatives, both historical and contemporary, aimed at regenerating and renewing disadvantaged neighbourhoods. You will learn why neighbourhoods become disadvantaged and how approaches to addressing these issues differ temporally, spatially and ideologically.

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KE7026 -

Advanced Research Methods (Core, 20 Credits)

This module provides you with advanced training in research design, data collection and data analysis. You will learn about the theoretical foundations of methodological aspects of social science research as well as the benefits and limits of a range of advanced research methods. This will put you in a position to better plan a research strategy and operationalise your Research Project. However, it will also help you in future graduate employment positions, by being able to critically scrutinise the basis, methods and findings of others’ research and arguments (both academic and non-academic).The module will examine the key aspects of the research design process, tailored to your own areas of research interest, and will review a range of both qualitative and quantitative methods, as well as the intersections between them. In addition to the core methods used in social sciences, you will also be introduced to more innovative and contemporary approaches to data collection and analysis in human geography as demonstrated through the work of these involved in the teaching of this module. Key areas covered include:
- Designing Your Research
- Ethics and Risk
- Fieldwork Research Issues
- Quantitative, qualitative and mixed method techniques
- Data analysis
- Communication of findings

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