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On this highly practical course we will provide you with the necessary scientific understanding of food science and human nutrition to take the next step into your chosen career. You’ll be introduced to food safety and quality, food sensory analysis, new product development, food processing and preservation, as well as applied and practical nutrition skills and clinical nutrition and dietetics.

The course also offers flexibility as you can opt for a specialist pathway of study after your first year - meaning you can either continue with BSc Food Science and Nutrition, or choose to specialise in BSc Human Nutrition which has an emphasis on developing proficiencies in nutrition specific professions and is accredited with the Association for Nutrition. If you chose to follow the Human Nutrition pathway you will have the opportunity to apply for Direct Entry to the UKVRN at Associate status.

Whichever pathway you choose, there will be extensive opportunities to gain real-world experience and apply your knowledge with a six-week work based placement in your second year and the option of completing an industrial placement in third year.

On graduation you will be ready and able to contribute to the food and health agenda in roles spanning product development and quality assurance through to procurement, sales and marketing. 

92% of students were satisfied with the learning community and learning opportunities with others as part of this course (National Student Survey, 2018).

On this highly practical course we will provide you with the necessary scientific understanding of food science and human nutrition to take the next step into your chosen career. You’ll be introduced to food safety and quality, food sensory analysis, new product development, food processing and preservation, as well as applied and practical nutrition skills and clinical nutrition and dietetics.

The course also offers flexibility as you can opt for a specialist pathway of study after your first year - meaning you can either continue with BSc Food Science and Nutrition, or choose to specialise in BSc Human Nutrition which has an emphasis on developing proficiencies in nutrition specific professions and is accredited with the Association for Nutrition. If you chose to follow the Human Nutrition pathway you will have the opportunity to apply for Direct Entry to the UKVRN at Associate status.

Whichever pathway you choose, there will be extensive opportunities to gain real-world experience and apply your knowledge with a six-week work based placement in your second year and the option of completing an industrial placement in third year.

On graduation you will be ready and able to contribute to the food and health agenda in roles spanning product development and quality assurance through to procurement, sales and marketing. 

92% of students were satisfied with the learning community and learning opportunities with others as part of this course (National Student Survey, 2018).

Course Information

UCAS Code
BD46

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Applied Sciences

Location
City Campus, Northumbria University

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019 or September 2020

Fee Information

Module Information

Department / Applied Sciences

The Department of Applied Sciences has an exciting and extensive portfolio of subjects including biology, biomedical sciences, chemistry, forensic science, food and nutritional sciences.

Book an Open Day / Experience Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Food Science and Nutrition. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You will be provided with the best possible practical learning experience through wet lab and IT based classes, which will include data collection and the use of specialist software such as our very own food processing pilot plant.

The learning experience is collaborative with lectures, tutorials and seminars led by academic staff, students and external lecturers, who bring specific knowledge and provide you with the opportunity to debate contemporary topics with industry active specialists.

The ability to follow your own interests is encouraged with practical course components such as dietetic career days, factory visits and other industrial trips that will help you apply your learning and develop your career ambitions for the future.

At all stages of study you will be encouraged to embrace your creativity, to approach problems innovatively and to develop entrepreneurship skills through innovative assessment tasks.

Food Science and Nutrition Student Profiles

Hear what it is really like to study our Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons) from our current students.

Book an Open Day / Experience Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Food Science and Nutrition. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Our teaching staff is made up of industry specialists and registered nutritionists from a broad range of backgrounds. Each academic brings with them vast experience, from working with firms such as Unilever to conducting research on behalf of government departments and within leading hospitals.

They are all actively engaged in contemporary research and consultancy – partnering with industry on research, working on on-going public sector projects and collaborating with businesses and governments on a worldwide scale.

This passion and commitment translates into inspiring teaching and we’re exceptionally proud of the consistently great feedback we have about the quality of teaching delivered on the BSc Food Science and Nutrition courses. In the last National Student Survey (2015) 100% of students said they’d received sufficient advice and support with their studies while 95% said that tutors were good at explaining things.

Book an Open Day / Experience Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Food Science and Nutrition. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

You will work in state-of-the-art laboratories and with specialist software, building your ability in core areas to make your transition into the world of work easier.

You’ll have excellent lecture resources to work with too. All academic materials are available on your online learning platform (eLP), allowing you to learn at your own pace and stay up to date, wherever you are.

Digital reading lists provide instant access to key texts and you’ll be able to submit and receive feedback on assessments electronically. Electronic discussion boards such as wikis and blogs are used for networking, support and review.

You’ll always be given a full understanding of the scope, method and application of your studies, helping you to progress and readying you for your first job or further research.

  

Applied Sciences Facilities

The Department of Applied Sciences has modern laboratory and computing resources for learning, teaching, research, innovation and business engagement.

Virtual Tour

Come and explore our outstanding facilities in this interactive virtual tour.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Food Science and Nutrition. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Research rich learning is a core component of the teaching strategy, whichever pathway you choose.

At each stage of your learning, research-led teaching encourages you to critically engage with current research while developing your own research interests. Staff are currently exploring topics as diverse as eating disorders, nutrition in care homes, food chemistry and flavour formation and antioxidant supplementation.

You’ll have the opportunity to look at these topics through a research rich lens, building your research skills at each level in preparation for your final year research project. This helps you develop professional skills and critical thinking that are very much in demand in the workplace. 


Book an Open Day / Experience Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Food Science and Nutrition. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

A rich programme of visits, real-world work placements and an optional year in industry will help you gain insight and build contacts and knowledge that will help you launch your career.

When you apply for your industry placement you’ll get specialist help from your faculty placement coordinator, who will encourage and support you to seek additional professional and voluntary placements.

Fascinated by cultural aspects of food and nutrition studies? You will be particularly interested in the Food Science and Nutrition reciprocal exchange programme with the Institute of Vocational Education in Hong Kong. Exchange students benefit from final year teaching delivered in English in the cultural capital.

Those studying the BSc (Hons) Food Science and Nutrition programme can apply for ANutr status via portfolio assessment.

If you choose to follow the Human Nutrition pathway accredited by the Association for Nutrition, you will be able to join the UK Voluntary Register of Nutritionists at Associate Nutritionist level.

 

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Food Science and Nutrition. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The hands-on teaching approach on the Food and Nutrition and Human Nutrition courses provides you with subject-specific skills you will need in the workplace.

You’ll also develop a host of transferrable skills that are in demand with employers.

Sought after skills from critical thinking and project management through to data mining and record keeping will support your future career choices. You may choose to launch a specialist career or research within the field of Food and Nutrition or to cast your net wider.

A range of careers will be open to you when you graduate, including product development, technical and quality assurance, marketing, sales or management positions.

Book an Open Day / Experience Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Food Science and Nutrition. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Your course in brief

Year 1

Year one Year 1 students should be introduced to the academic literacies required to perform successfully in higher education. In this formative year, it is expected that Research Rich Learning will be chiefly concerned with an introduction to research methodologies and knowledge construction, gaining confidence of approaches to research and critical thinking, and with sufficient guidance for students to enable them to engage in well-structured and bounded enquiry based learning.

Year 2

Year two Year 2 students should be provided with bounded, but flexible, negotiated opportunities for greater critical enquiry; during this year students should be given more opportunities to operate as participants in research projects. Students should be encouraged to develop their critical thinking, and take responsibility for their own study, such as by defining their own research projects and literature based reviews.

Year 3

Year three Year 3 students will capitalise on the academic experiences of the previous years, synthesizing their learning and experience through a summative ‘capstone’ assignment which demonstrates autonomous learning, academic rigour, self-directed purpose, and intellectual ambition.

Who would this Course suit?

Are you interested in the nutrition and food issues dominating health agendas? If you want to develop tomorrow’s solutions to problems such as food shortages and further our understanding of dietary issues such as obesity, this could be the perfect course for you.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels including Grade B in a Science subject, Food Technology or Home Economics

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit to include a significant Science subject, Food Technology or Home Economics component

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level including Biology, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher including a Science subject, Food Technology or Home Economics

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB including Science subject, Food Technology or Home Economics

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level including Science subject, Food Technology or Home Economics

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit including Science subject, Food Technology or Home Economics

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Entry Requirements 2020/21

Standard Entry

120 UCAS Tariff points
From a combination of acceptable Level 3 qualifications which may include: A level, BTEC Diplomas/Extended Diplomas, Scottish and Irish Highers, Access to HE Diplomas or the International Baccalaureate

Find out how many points your qualifications are worth using the UCAS Tariff calculator: www.ucas.com/ucas/tariff-calculator

Subject Requirements:
Grade B in an A level Science, Food Technology or Home Economics, or recognised equivalents

GCSE Requirements:
Students will need Maths and English Language at minimum grade 4 or C, or the equivalent.

Additional Requirements:
There are no additional requirements for this course

International Qualifications:
We welcome applicants with a range of qualifications from the UK and worldwide which may not exactly match those shown above. If you have taken qualifications outside the UK you can find out how your qualifications compare by visiting our country page www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

English Language Requirements:
International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

*The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There may be travel costs associated with travel for optional modules and these can range between approximately £50-£100. Optional Modules where you are expected to have DBS clearance will incur a mandatory charge of approximately £50. You can also purchase books for the programme with the approximate cost of £100-£200.

Scholarships and Discounts

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Fees and Funding 2020/21 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: TBC

Undergraduate fees are set by Government and are subject to annual review. Once these have been approved we will update fees/funding information for UK and EU students.


International Fee in Year 1: £15,500

Scholarships for 2020/2021 entry have not been announced. Please visit the 2019/2020 international scholarship page for the 2019/2020 scholarship offer.


ADDITIONAL COSTS

TBC


Scholarships and Discounts

20/21 fees and funding information has not been confirmed. 19/20 information is listed below.

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

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* By submitting your information you are consenting to your data being processed by Northumbria University (as Data Controller) and Campus Management Corp. (acting as Data Processor). To see the University's privacy policy please click here

How to Apply

Applications via UCAS

Most full-time and sandwich first degrees, extended degrees, DipHE and HND courses require that application is made through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) Clearing House.

If you are at school or college, staff there will advise you on how to apply. If you are not at school or college, you can apply using the UCAS secure, web-based online application system ucasapply.

Applicants apply via UCAS apply wherever there is access to the internet, and full instructions and an online help facility is available. Application details can be checked and printed at any time, text for personal statements and references can be copied and pasted into applications from a word processing package, and applications can normally be processed by the relevant Clearing House within one working day once submitted. More details on apply can be found on the UCAS website at www.ucas.com.

  • The UCAS institution code for Northumbria University is NORTH N77

If you wish to defer your entry, you should ensure you indicate this in section 3i of the application form. Full details of application deadlines and the application fee can be found on the UCAS website. Please note, however, we are unable to consider applications for deferred entry to our Teacher Training, Nursing, Midwifery and Operating Department Practice programmes.

Application Deadlines

Equal consideration is given to all applications received at UCAS by 6.00pm on 15 January. Details of all UCAS deadlines can be found on the UCAS website www.ucas.com.

UCAS will accept applications up to 30 June, but we can only consider these if there are still vacancies in relevant subjects. You are advised to check with the University before applying for popular courses which may already be full. Candidates applying for any courses after early September must follow the UCAS Late Registration Procedure, and we will provide the appropriate form.

Decision Making Process

When we receive your application it will be forwarded to the Admissions Tutor who will consider your application in accordance with the University’s Admissions Policy.

Most subject areas do not require applicants to attend an interview as part of the selection procedure. However, if the standard procedure is to interview candidates, this is specified in the degree programme entrance requirements. Some courses, such as Health, Social Work and Teacher Training, require specific checks or requirements to be put in place during the normal selection process. These are detailed on the individual course details pages.

Fairness and Transparency

The University is committed to a system of admissions that ensures fairness, transparency and equal opportunities within the legal framework of the UK and best practice. All reasonable effort will be made to ensure that no prospective or existing student is unreasonably treated less favourably on the grounds of age, race, colour, nationality, ethnic origin, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender, marital or parental/carer status, political belief or social or economic class, or any other type of discrimination.

What Happens Next

You will receive one of the following from UCAS or our Admissions Office:

  • Conditional offer which depends on you achieving certain grades from forthcoming examinations, completing relevant checks, or other requirements prior to entry. You may be asked to send us a copy of your certificates/qualifications once these have been received to enable us to confirm your offer. Not all examination results are sent to Universities via UCAS.
  • Unconditional offer if you have already satisfied entry requirements.
  • Reject your application.

Tuition Fee Assessment

Tuition fees are set at different levels for Home/EU and International Students. Before you begin your course the University must establish your tuition fee status. In many cases, the University will be able to make this assessment without requiring any additional information.

Guidance can be found on the UK Council for International Student Affairs (UKCISA) website www.ukcisa.org.uk to help you understand how Higher Education Institutions (HEI’s) make an assessment on your fee status.

Selection Process

Interviews

Applicants who may not have the standard entry qualifications are welcome to apply and may be interviewed. Some courses will interview as part of the selection process. This applies particularly to courses in art and design, teaching and health.

Health Screening

Applicants for Nursing, Midwifery, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, Primary (Early Years) and Social Work will be required to complete a health questionnaire, and you may be required to attend a doctor or nurse assessment at the University Health Centre.

Prior to beginning your programme, all applicants to Nursing, Midwifery, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy are advised to start a course of Hepatitis B vaccinations, available from your own GP. In addition, Midwifery applicants must provide evidence before they commence training that they are immune to Hepatitis B or have Hepatitis B non-carried status.

Applicants to these courses who have had contact with MRSA in the previous 6 months may be asked to provide evidence that they are not colonised by submitting negative swabs results prior to commencement of training. Alternatively, you may be screened on commencement of the programme.

All applicants will receive vaccination screening at the University Health Centre on commencement of their programme.

Disclosure of Criminal Background

To help the University reduce the risk of harm or injury to any member of its community caused by the criminal behaviour of other students, it must know about any relevant criminal convictions an applicant has.

Relevant criminal convictions are only those convictions for offences against the person, whether of a violent or sexual nature, and convictions for offences involving unlawfully supplying controlled drugs or substances where the conviction concerns commercial drug dealing or trafficking. Convictions that are spent (as defined by the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974) are not considered to be relevant and you should not reveal them - unless you are applying for one of the courses outlined within the following paragraph.

If you are applying for courses in teaching, health, social work and courses involving work with children or vulnerable adults, you must complete the section of your UCAS application form entitled ‘Criminal Convictions’. You must disclose anycriminal convictions, including spent sentences and cautions (including verbal cautions) and bindover orders. Further information on how to complete this section is available from the UCAS booklet ‘How to Apply’. For these courses, applicants are required to undergo police clearance for entry and will need to complete a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) enhanced disclosure form. 

The Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) helps employers make safer recruitment decisions and prevent unsuitable people from working with vulnerable groups, including children. It replaces the Criminal Records Bureau (CRB) and Independent Safeguarding Authority (ISA). Access to the DBS checking service is only available to registered employers who are entitled by law to ask an individual to reveal their full criminal history, including spent convictions - also known as asking 'an exempted question'. The University is such a 'registered employer' and will send you the appropriate documents to fill in if you are offered a place in the course.

If you are convicted of a relevant criminal offence after you have applied, you must tell UCAS and the University. Do not send details of the offence; simply tell UCAS and the University that you have a relevant criminal conviction. You may then be asked to supply more details.

Anti-fraud Checks

Please note that both UCAS and the University follow anti-fraud procedures to detect and prevent fraudulent applications. If it is found that an applicant supplies a fraudulent application then it will be withdrawn.

Plagiarism

Applicants suspected of providing, or found to have provided, false information will be referred to UCAS if their application was made via UCAS. The same is true for applicants who are suspected of omitting, or found to have omitted, information that they are required to disclose according to UCAS regulations. Applications identified by UCAS’s Similarity Detection software to contain plagiarised material will be considered on an individual basis by Admissions Staff, taking into account the nature, relevance and importance of the plagiarism. The University reserves the right to cancel an application or withdraw any offer made if it is found that an application contains false, plagiarised or misleading information.

Extra

The Extra process enables applicants who have not been offered a place, or have declined all offers received, can use EXTRA to apply for other courses that still have vacancies before Clearing starts. The Extra process normally operates from late February until the end of June and Applicants should use the Course Search facility at UCAS to find which courses have vacancies.

Clearing

If you have not succeeded in gaining a place at your firm or insurance university, UCAS will send you details about Clearing, the procedure which matches course vacancies with students who do not have a university place. Information about degree vacancies at Northumbria is published in the national press; and you can also find information on our dedicated Clearing web pages during this period. We operate a Helpline - 0191 40 60 901 - throughout the Clearing period for enquiries about course vacancies.

Adjustment
If an applicant has both met and exceeded the conditions of their firmly accepted offer, they will have up to five calendar days from the time their place was confirmed (or A level results day, whichever is the later) to research places more appropriate to their performance. Applicants will have to nominate themselves for this system, and their eligibility will be confirmed by the institution they apply to adjust to.

Going to University from Care
Northumbria University is proud of its work in widening participation of young people and adults to university. We have recently been successful in being awarded the Frank Buttle Trust Quality Mark for Care Leavers in Higher Education. This mark was created to recognise institutions who go that extra mile to support students who have been in public care. To find out more, visit our Going to University from Care web page.

Disabled Students

Northumbria welcomes enquiries and applications from disabled students whether disability is due to mobility or sensory impairment, specific learning difficulties, mental health issues or a medical condition. Applications from disabled students are processed in the usual way, but applicants should declare their disability at the application stage so that the University can contact them to assess how to meet any support needs they may have. Disabled applicants may be invited to visit the University so that this can be done in person.

To find out more contact:
Disability Support Team
Tel +44 (0)191 227 3849 or
Minicom +44 (0)191 222 1051

International Students

The University has a thriving overseas community and applications from International students are welcome. Advice on the suitability of overseas qualifications is available from:

International Office
Northumbria University
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 8ST
UK
Email: international@northumbria.ac.uk
Tel +44 (0)191 227 4274
Fax +44 (0)191 261 1264

(However, if you have already applied to Northumbria and have a query, please contact internationaladmissions@northumbria.ac.uk or telephone 00 44 191 243 7906)

Provision of Information

The University reserves the right at any stage to request applicants and enrolling students to provide additional information about any aspect of their application or enrolment. In the event of any student providing false or inaccurate information at any stage, and/or failing to provide additional information when requested to do so, the University further reserves the right to refuse to consider an application, to withdraw registration, rescind home fees status where applicable, and/or demand payment of any fees or monies due to the University.

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AP0404 -

Cell Biology and Genetics (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about basics of the diversity of life and the unifying cell theory including, DNA as the universal information store and the central dogma of molecular biology as the unifying mechanism in all life. You will learn the structure and function of cells and the organelles they contain along with their life cycle, division, self-replication and eventual death.

You will learn the basic principles of heredity, including molecular, classical , human and microbial genetics. You will learn the structure, function, regulation of genes and genomes. You will also learn the fundamentals of applied genetics including an introduction to clinical genetics and the identification of genetic mutations and polymorphisms and their influence on disease processes.

Underpinning these theoretical concepts and principles covered in the lecture course you will be trained in basic techniques of handling DNA in the laboratory.

More information

AP0406 -

Practical Skills (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn the primary skills required to be a student of a science degree. These skills will cover both laboratory based and data/information retrieval and handling. As part of the laboratory skills you will study the importance of health & safety, ethics and appropriate sample handling. You will then move into the laboratory where hands on sessions offer you an opportunity to develop key skills in areas of liquid handling, microscopy, buffers, making solutions and dilutions, and enzymatic analysis. You will use your generated laboratory data to then study and understand appropriate methods of data manipulation and presentation. You will also on this module gain experience and confidence in searching for, understanding of and appreciation of scientific literature.

More information

AP0407 -

Biochemistry (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with an important and invaluable introduction to the structure and function of the principal molecular components of living systems, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. In addition you will learn about the actions and properties of enzymes. The first part of the module will provide you with a foundation for this by explaining relevant chemical concepts which underpin chemistry in biological systems, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and the nature of molecular interactions. Then we will consider several carbon containing compounds that are present in biological systems and their chemical and physical properties. Following this, an investigation will be conducted into the structure, nomenclature, functions and significance of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The role of proteins as enzymes will also be investigated to provide a foundation for the study of biochemistry in successive years.

More information

AP0408 -

Anatomy and Physiology (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn and understand the basics of Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body. You will also be introduced to the pathophysiology of some common diseases. You will learn about the general organization of the human body and some of the body systems including the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, nervous and respiratory systems. This module will provide you with the necessary basic knowledge required for the understanding of more advanced biomedical courses.

More information

AP0409 -

Fundamental Nutrition (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn some of the fundamental principles in the field of human nutrition such as the biochemistry, physiology, structure and function of macro and micronutrients. The focus of lectures will also be on the discussion of diet and the maintenance of optimum health. Examples and consequences of nutrient deficiencies and excesses, and the contribution of diet and lifestyle to the establishment of disease, will also be discussed. Another aspect of the module will explore nutritional methods used in a public health context including dietary assessment, dietary surveying as well as crucial concepts in nutritional studies (ie Eatwell Plate and portion sizes). Dietary reference values will also be introduced.

You will discuss comparisons of typical British diets with some important UK-ethnic diets and discuss the role of culture, education and personal preference on eating behaviour, including dysfunctional behaviour in the case of eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa).
During practical work you will look at the analytical methods used to identify and quantify nutrients present in foods, providing a link to the understanding of food nutritional labelling. Another practical component will introduce you to basic techniques in anthropometric measurements, and include calculations of body mass index and body composition indexes, and the discussion of their use and limitations for the assessment of human health status.

More information

AP0410 -

Food Science (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about some of the fundamental scientific principles underlying the manufacture of food products including the biological, chemical and physical properties of commonly used raw materials such as eggs, milk, cereal flours, plant derived products and muscle based ingredients.

You will study the changes that occur to molecular components such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and colour and flavour molecules during various food manufacturing processes and the effects on the overall properties of food products.

Chemical changes to food components such as hydrolysis, oxidation and reduction and physical changes like protein denaturation and changes in viscosity will be studied. Biological changes in the nutritional potential and microbiological and toxicological safety will also be considered.

You will learn about various food manufacturing processes such as the production of dairy products, baked merchandise, starch based sauces and desserts, meat products and colloidal systems like emulsions and foams. The use of additives and food preservation as well as methods of sensory and quality evaluation will be studied. You will be guided on the writing of a practical laboratory report following the IMRAD style.

More information

JE5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Applied Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AP0514 -

Human Metabolism (Core,20 Credits)

In ‘Human Metabolism’ you will learn of how the body breaks down various biological molecules such as sugars, fats and proteins to gain energy and how it converts these molecules into the other various essential components required to function normally. You will learn about the disorders that can arise and the resulting consequences, with a food and nutritional sciences approach. Consequences such as malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, diabetes and obesity will be discussed. You will learn about these various aspects in a system/organ-specific manner which will include the liver, the kidneys, heart and digestive tract, allowing you to clearly understand the relationship between normal and disrupted function.

More information

AP0521 -

Nutrition Through the Lifecycle (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces the concepts of nutrition as applied to stages of life, from infancy to old age and investigates diet-related health conditions. You will draw on your existing knowledge of dietary reference values and guidelines and explore the differing requirements and reasons for these, in different stages of life and states of health. You will also learn the theories of behaviour change so that you understand the ways in which health professionals can plan behaviour change interventions and support populations to make heathier choices.
Topics covered in this module include:
Principles of nutrition and dietetics:
Health promotion theory and practice,
Planning and constructing interventions
Energy balance and energy expenditure calculations.
Under and over nutrition:
Nutritional significance and requirements for nutrients through the lifecycle.
Diet-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, Diabetes mellitus, Cancer and dietary factors

More information

AP0522 -

Careers Skills in Food and Nutrition (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your self-awareness of your knowledge, skills, attributes and experience, to help support you in your career journey. You will gain hands-on experience of a work setting, allowing you to explore the roles and responsibilities if a food or nutrition-related industry. You will reflect on your experiences and consider how these can contribute to the development of graduate attributes and employability skills.

More information

AP0523 -

Analytical and Food Chemistry (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn some of the fundamental theoretical principles in the field of food chemistry with particular reference to the chemistry of food components, Maillard reaction, caramelisation and lipid oxidation. This will be supplemented with knowledge on the parameters that influence such reactions and the impact of processing and storage on the overall product quality.

You will learn about key theoretical concepts in analytical chemistry pertinent to quality control processes in a food manufacturing setting. Such concepts include physicochemical properties of food components as well as theoretical principles pertinent to food sampling, extraction, purification and determination using a series of analytical methodologies such as spectrophotometry, gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Theoretical concepts in data analysis will also be discussed and employed in IT workshops.

You will also learn and employ laboratory techniques in chemical analysis pertinent to the determination of macronutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrates), as well as techniques related to the determination of compounds such as vitamins, sugars and fatty acids. During practical work you will look at the analytical methods used to identify and quantify such nutrients, providing a link to the understanding of food nutritional labelling.

You will gain insights in Good Laboratory Practice and Health and Safety pertinent to analytical laboratories, as well as the importance of Quality Assurance schemes employed in laboratories.

More information

AP0524 -

Food Microbiology (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will develop your understanding of how microbes pervade the environment and impact the preparation, storage and safety of foods and drinks. You will explore the types of cellular microbes and their metabolism including yeast, filamentous fungi and bacteria. We will also consider the biology of non-cellular infectious agents such as viruses and prions and countermeasures required to prevent food-borne infection. You will explore the microbiology of the human digestive tract in health and disease and distinguish infection with food-borne pathogens from food-poisoning. Additionally, the value of microbes as probiotics will be explored. You will see the impact of culture conditions on food preservation and on laboratory-based tests for food safety. You will culture and qualitatively examine microbes to identify them and will also enumerate these in order to assess risk to human health or product quality. Additionally, you will also learn other quantitative techniques such as bioassays and estimations of microbial inactivation as in, for example, pasteurisation. You will consider the frequency and impact of endospore formation in relation to all of these aspects. Another important and exciting facet of the course will be the rapid detection of microbial products like DNA and antigens using modern molecular analyses rather than traditional culture-based methods.

More information

AP0525 -

Applied and Practical Nutrition (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will build upon the knowledge and skills you acquired during Fundamental Nutrition and you will also have the opportunity to develop your professional, research and practical skills as there is a strong emphasis on ‘hands-on’ nutrition.

Lectures during this module will include how you interpret and apply basic nutritional guidelines and policies to individuals and groups and the various roles that diet and nutrition can play in disease and in healthy ageing. The use of dietary surveys and epidemiological studies to identify links between diet and disease and how this evidence is used in nutritional guidance for the public and individuals will also be covered. You will become aware of the factors influencing dietary intake and barriers encountered when recommending dietary change.

You will learn about various laboratory techniques used in the nutrition research setting, as well having the opportunity to prepare and evaluate a planned diet for a particular individual determining its worth using your knowledge of dietary guidelines, individual requirements and in-depth dietary analysis skills. Further practical sessions will develop your research and data analysis skills using experimental data that you have gathered during laboratory and IT sessions.

The practical element of this module will help you to develop your critical evaluation skills and your self-awareness of the professional and research skills required to become a nutritionist.

More information

AP0538 -

Research Methods for Food and Nutrition (Core,20 Credits)

Food science and human nutrition are predominantly practical subjects which require a hands on approach to the development of the essential research skills and methodology required for final year students, in particular the final year ‘capstone’ research project module.

In this module students will learn a lot about how research generally ‘works’ and is conducted and communicated within food science and human nutrition. The lectures and seminars on the module will introduce topics such as the research ‘heirarchy’, scientific communication and the presentation of research, academic integrity as a keystone in research and also different types of, and approaches to research undertaken within food and nutritional science, both quantitative and qualitative; However, the emphasis of the teaching and learning on this module is practical and most formal scheduled teaching is via workshops and practical classes, so that students will learn via hands on experience and develop a high level of competence.

Subjects will include [i] literature based research methods, so that students develop effective literature search strategies, to search, select and retrieve relevant academic information, and cite it appropriately in support of finding and conclusions [ii] quality assurance and critical reading, so that students can assess published information in terms of the likely validity and reliability of content [iii] constraints applying to the design of valid experiments, such as taking account of likely sources of error, appropriate risk and ethical assessment etc. to ensure quality of research and safety of both researcher and research subject(s) [iv] graphical and statistical approaches to the interpretation of scientific data and use of hypothesis-testing statistics to assess the significance of experimental results – use of SPSS statistical software [v] an introduction to qualitative methodology, such as survey design and focus grops/ interview techniques and the analysis of data.

This module will give students the opportunity to explore how research works and is communicated within food science and human nutrition, with an overall aim of developing students who are competent junior researchers.

More information

AP0536 -

Study Abroad (Optional,120 Credits)

This study abroad module is designed for standard full-time undergraduate programmes to provide you with the option to take an additional one year study abroad within your programme.

Study abroad provides an opportunity to develop personal skills in a different learning environment with a partner university. The module does not affect the classification of your degree, but if successfully passed the study abroad year is recognised in your transcript and degree certificate. There is a competitive selection process for placements and places cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AP0616 -

Biological and Food Sciences Research Project (Core,40 Credits)

You will learn how to plan a literature investigation on a specific research topic, exploit appropriate sources and databases to search for information, evaluate and critically review the primary literature articles and assess their significance in the broader context, evaluate experimentation protocols required to carry out the proposed research, conduct experiments in a safe and effective manner and discuss the validity and significance of the data provided, present the project work in the form of an oral presentation and written report in an appropriate style and format.

More information

AP0617 -

Product Development and Sensory Analysis (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn some of the fundamental theoretical principles in the field of food marketing and complement that with processes related to new product development and innovation in the food industry. Current and future trends in food production will be discussed and complemented with a group research project.
You will also learn and employ practical skills and techniques pertinent to the development and assessment of new food products. Theoretical knowledge on food ingredients, food market and innovation drivers will be translated into a practical assignment with the aim to develop an innovative products.
You will learn about key theoretical and practical concepts in sensory analysis of foodstuffs and complement that with workshops on data analysis and statistics pertinent to sensory data.
You will gain insights in Good Manufacturing Practice, workflows pertinent to New Product Development teams and practical experience in running product trials.

More information

AP0618 -

Food and Nutrition - Policy and Issues (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will reflect on current issues in the ever-changing world of food science and nutrition. The pace of development and change in the field will mean that the syllabus will change, evolve and respond to contemporary issues. The module will identify the scope of food policy, and assess who influences policy, inter-relationships and the dynamics that shape policy. It will allow you to understand and evaluate what is meant by policy in the food system, from farm to fork, and introduce major themes and key thinkers in food policy. The module will explore issues which impact at a global level, from Millennium Development Goals to environmental effect of food waste. You will review and assess current policies and develop your awareness of the following aspects:
Policy making process(es)
Policy in the UK, EU and world-wide
Food policy
Public health policy
Political influence

You will also increase your understanding of major trends in a consumer driven food system to include, economic and social factors across the wide spectrum of consumer groups. The emphasis of this aspect of the module will be in developing your on-going inquiry into the issues which will impact both on food industry and consumers and evaluation of the role of the media in communicating information of this type to the population.

More information

AP0619 -

Food Quality and Safety (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn the principles and practices involved in the maintenance of quality and safety within the food industry.
You will learn about the concept and value of quality assurance and quality control procedures in the production of food. You will develop an understanding of recognised quality and safety systems such as International Standards Organisation (ISO) and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP).
You will also learn how to apply your theoretical knowledge in the setting up of HACCP systems and prepare and present the documentation associated with HACCP.
You will be able to differentiate between quality assurance and quality control and discuss the importance of quality systems in satisfying the requirements of both legislation and the needs of the consumer.
You will be able to appraise the Health and Safety risks associated with the production of food and prepare and present the documentation associated with H&S risk assessment.

More information

AP0620 -

Food Processing and Preservation (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn the principles and practices involved in the food processing with emphasis to food preservation. Food processing operations are central to food quality, safety and product shelf life and via participation in the module you will learn about the relationship between processes and product quality and safety as well as appreciate how food processing may change the organoleptic and nutritional characteristics of food substances in addition to the effects on storage life.
You will learn the principles and applications of the most frequently used food processing operations within the food industry such as freezing drying and thermal processing i.e. pasteurisation and sterilization.
You will be introduced in more advanced food processing operations such as membrane processing, high pressure processing and ohmic heating. These novel food processes are securing significant product quality improvements over conventional methods and thus have already found their way into food industry practises.
The module is designed to enable you understand the combined effects of ingredients and processing on the quality of processed products and teach you how to apply knowledge of micro-organisms to an understanding of the principles of food preservation.
You will also learn how to conduct numerical calculations needed to understand the basis of processes and use necessary numerical calculations, formulae and graphical methods to assess the efficiency of a process.

More information

AP0621 -

Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed to develop an understanding of the principles of clinical nutrition, dietary intervention and treatment strategies. You will learn about the biochemical basis of a range of disorders that are seen in the clinic.
You will learn about how to assess nutritional status using anthropometric, clinical and biochemical data and how these relate to case studies and nutrition-related to disease. You will learn how each clinical or metabolic disorder influences nutritional status, and the underlying metabolic complications that cause these conditions will be highlighted.
You will learn about the principles of dietetics, dietary management and control in the clinical environment. You will learn how clinical conditions can influence nutritional status and how these conditions are treated through adequate nutrition.

More information

AP0622 -

Investigative Sport and Exercise Nutrition (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed to develop an understanding of the principles and applications of nutritional interventions in the context of sport and exercise performance and health outcomes.
You will learn about the scientific evidence behind health claims associated with dietary interventions, the use of ergogenic aids and other supplementation through critical evaluation. You will learn about the effects and detection of drugs and doping agents within sport.. In addition, the role of the nutritionist in practice will be reviewed in accordance with external guidelines/codes of conduct for nutrition professionals.

More information

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AP0404 -

Cell Biology and Genetics (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about basics of the diversity of life and the unifying cell theory including, DNA as the universal information store and the central dogma of molecular biology as the unifying mechanism in all life. You will learn the structure and function of cells and the organelles they contain along with their life cycle, division, self-replication and eventual death.

You will learn the basic principles of heredity, including molecular, classical , human and microbial genetics. You will learn the structure, function, regulation of genes and genomes. You will also learn the fundamentals of applied genetics including an introduction to clinical genetics and the identification of genetic mutations and polymorphisms and their influence on disease processes.

Underpinning these theoretical concepts and principles covered in the lecture course you will be trained in basic techniques of handling DNA in the laboratory.

More information

AP0406 -

Practical Skills (Core,20 Credits)

On this module you will learn the primary skills required to be a student of a science degree. These skills will cover both laboratory based and data/information retrieval and handling. As part of the laboratory skills you will study the importance of health & safety, ethics and appropriate sample handling. You will then move into the laboratory where hands on sessions offer you an opportunity to develop key skills in areas of liquid handling, microscopy, buffers, making solutions and dilutions, and enzymatic analysis. You will use your generated laboratory data to then study and understand appropriate methods of data manipulation and presentation. You will also on this module gain experience and confidence in searching for, understanding of and appreciation of scientific literature.

More information

AP0407 -

Biochemistry (Core,20 Credits)

This module will provide you with an important and invaluable introduction to the structure and function of the principal molecular components of living systems, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. In addition you will learn about the actions and properties of enzymes. The first part of the module will provide you with a foundation for this by explaining relevant chemical concepts which underpin chemistry in biological systems, including atomic structure, chemical bonding and the nature of molecular interactions. Then we will consider several carbon containing compounds that are present in biological systems and their chemical and physical properties. Following this, an investigation will be conducted into the structure, nomenclature, functions and significance of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. The role of proteins as enzymes will also be investigated to provide a foundation for the study of biochemistry in successive years.

More information

AP0408 -

Anatomy and Physiology (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will learn and understand the basics of Anatomy and Physiology of the Human Body. You will also be introduced to the pathophysiology of some common diseases. You will learn about the general organization of the human body and some of the body systems including the skeletal, muscular, cardiovascular, endocrine, digestive, nervous and respiratory systems. This module will provide you with the necessary basic knowledge required for the understanding of more advanced biomedical courses.

More information

AP0409 -

Fundamental Nutrition (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn some of the fundamental principles in the field of human nutrition such as the biochemistry, physiology, structure and function of macro and micronutrients. The focus of lectures will also be on the discussion of diet and the maintenance of optimum health. Examples and consequences of nutrient deficiencies and excesses, and the contribution of diet and lifestyle to the establishment of disease, will also be discussed. Another aspect of the module will explore nutritional methods used in a public health context including dietary assessment, dietary surveying as well as crucial concepts in nutritional studies (ie Eatwell Plate and portion sizes). Dietary reference values will also be introduced.

You will discuss comparisons of typical British diets with some important UK-ethnic diets and discuss the role of culture, education and personal preference on eating behaviour, including dysfunctional behaviour in the case of eating disorders (anorexia and bulimia nervosa).
During practical work you will look at the analytical methods used to identify and quantify nutrients present in foods, providing a link to the understanding of food nutritional labelling. Another practical component will introduce you to basic techniques in anthropometric measurements, and include calculations of body mass index and body composition indexes, and the discussion of their use and limitations for the assessment of human health status.

More information

AP0410 -

Food Science (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn about some of the fundamental scientific principles underlying the manufacture of food products including the biological, chemical and physical properties of commonly used raw materials such as eggs, milk, cereal flours, plant derived products and muscle based ingredients.

You will study the changes that occur to molecular components such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and colour and flavour molecules during various food manufacturing processes and the effects on the overall properties of food products.

Chemical changes to food components such as hydrolysis, oxidation and reduction and physical changes like protein denaturation and changes in viscosity will be studied. Biological changes in the nutritional potential and microbiological and toxicological safety will also be considered.

You will learn about various food manufacturing processes such as the production of dairy products, baked merchandise, starch based sauces and desserts, meat products and colloidal systems like emulsions and foams. The use of additives and food preservation as well as methods of sensory and quality evaluation will be studied. You will be guided on the writing of a practical laboratory report following the IMRAD style.

More information

JE5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Applied Sciences (Core – for International and EU students only,0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AP0514 -

Human Metabolism (Core,20 Credits)

In ‘Human Metabolism’ you will learn of how the body breaks down various biological molecules such as sugars, fats and proteins to gain energy and how it converts these molecules into the other various essential components required to function normally. You will learn about the disorders that can arise and the resulting consequences, with a food and nutritional sciences approach. Consequences such as malnutrition, vitamin deficiencies, diabetes and obesity will be discussed. You will learn about these various aspects in a system/organ-specific manner which will include the liver, the kidneys, heart and digestive tract, allowing you to clearly understand the relationship between normal and disrupted function.

More information

AP0521 -

Nutrition Through the Lifecycle (Core,20 Credits)

This module introduces the concepts of nutrition as applied to stages of life, from infancy to old age and investigates diet-related health conditions. You will draw on your existing knowledge of dietary reference values and guidelines and explore the differing requirements and reasons for these, in different stages of life and states of health. You will also learn the theories of behaviour change so that you understand the ways in which health professionals can plan behaviour change interventions and support populations to make heathier choices.
Topics covered in this module include:
Principles of nutrition and dietetics:
Health promotion theory and practice,
Planning and constructing interventions
Energy balance and energy expenditure calculations.
Under and over nutrition:
Nutritional significance and requirements for nutrients through the lifecycle.
Diet-related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, Diabetes mellitus, Cancer and dietary factors

More information

AP0522 -

Careers Skills in Food and Nutrition (Core,20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with an opportunity to develop your self-awareness of your knowledge, skills, attributes and experience, to help support you in your career journey. You will gain hands-on experience of a work setting, allowing you to explore the roles and responsibilities if a food or nutrition-related industry. You will reflect on your experiences and consider how these can contribute to the development of graduate attributes and employability skills.

More information

AP0523 -

Analytical and Food Chemistry (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn some of the fundamental theoretical principles in the field of food chemistry with particular reference to the chemistry of food components, Maillard reaction, caramelisation and lipid oxidation. This will be supplemented with knowledge on the parameters that influence such reactions and the impact of processing and storage on the overall product quality.

You will learn about key theoretical concepts in analytical chemistry pertinent to quality control processes in a food manufacturing setting. Such concepts include physicochemical properties of food components as well as theoretical principles pertinent to food sampling, extraction, purification and determination using a series of analytical methodologies such as spectrophotometry, gas chromatography (GC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Theoretical concepts in data analysis will also be discussed and employed in IT workshops.

You will also learn and employ laboratory techniques in chemical analysis pertinent to the determination of macronutrients (protein, fat, carbohydrates), as well as techniques related to the determination of compounds such as vitamins, sugars and fatty acids. During practical work you will look at the analytical methods used to identify and quantify such nutrients, providing a link to the understanding of food nutritional labelling.

You will gain insights in Good Laboratory Practice and Health and Safety pertinent to analytical laboratories, as well as the importance of Quality Assurance schemes employed in laboratories.

More information

AP0524 -

Food Microbiology (Optional,20 Credits)

This module will develop your understanding of how microbes pervade the environment and impact the preparation, storage and safety of foods and drinks. You will explore the types of cellular microbes and their metabolism including yeast, filamentous fungi and bacteria. We will also consider the biology of non-cellular infectious agents such as viruses and prions and countermeasures required to prevent food-borne infection. You will explore the microbiology of the human digestive tract in health and disease and distinguish infection with food-borne pathogens from food-poisoning. Additionally, the value of microbes as probiotics will be explored. You will see the impact of culture conditions on food preservation and on laboratory-based tests for food safety. You will culture and qualitatively examine microbes to identify them and will also enumerate these in order to assess risk to human health or product quality. Additionally, you will also learn other quantitative techniques such as bioassays and estimations of microbial inactivation as in, for example, pasteurisation. You will consider the frequency and impact of endospore formation in relation to all of these aspects. Another important and exciting facet of the course will be the rapid detection of microbial products like DNA and antigens using modern molecular analyses rather than traditional culture-based methods.

More information

AP0525 -

Applied and Practical Nutrition (Optional,20 Credits)

In this module you will build upon the knowledge and skills you acquired during Fundamental Nutrition and you will also have the opportunity to develop your professional, research and practical skills as there is a strong emphasis on ‘hands-on’ nutrition.

Lectures during this module will include how you interpret and apply basic nutritional guidelines and policies to individuals and groups and the various roles that diet and nutrition can play in disease and in healthy ageing. The use of dietary surveys and epidemiological studies to identify links between diet and disease and how this evidence is used in nutritional guidance for the public and individuals will also be covered. You will become aware of the factors influencing dietary intake and barriers encountered when recommending dietary change.

You will learn about various laboratory techniques used in the nutrition research setting, as well having the opportunity to prepare and evaluate a planned diet for a particular individual determining its worth using your knowledge of dietary guidelines, individual requirements and in-depth dietary analysis skills. Further practical sessions will develop your research and data analysis skills using experimental data that you have gathered during laboratory and IT sessions.

The practical element of this module will help you to develop your critical evaluation skills and your self-awareness of the professional and research skills required to become a nutritionist.

More information

AP0538 -

Research Methods for Food and Nutrition (Core,20 Credits)

Food science and human nutrition are predominantly practical subjects which require a hands on approach to the development of the essential research skills and methodology required for final year students, in particular the final year ‘capstone’ research project module.

In this module students will learn a lot about how research generally ‘works’ and is conducted and communicated within food science and human nutrition. The lectures and seminars on the module will introduce topics such as the research ‘heirarchy’, scientific communication and the presentation of research, academic integrity as a keystone in research and also different types of, and approaches to research undertaken within food and nutritional science, both quantitative and qualitative; However, the emphasis of the teaching and learning on this module is practical and most formal scheduled teaching is via workshops and practical classes, so that students will learn via hands on experience and develop a high level of competence.

Subjects will include [i] literature based research methods, so that students develop effective literature search strategies, to search, select and retrieve relevant academic information, and cite it appropriately in support of finding and conclusions [ii] quality assurance and critical reading, so that students can assess published information in terms of the likely validity and reliability of content [iii] constraints applying to the design of valid experiments, such as taking account of likely sources of error, appropriate risk and ethical assessment etc. to ensure quality of research and safety of both researcher and research subject(s) [iv] graphical and statistical approaches to the interpretation of scientific data and use of hypothesis-testing statistics to assess the significance of experimental results – use of SPSS statistical software [v] an introduction to qualitative methodology, such as survey design and focus grops/ interview techniques and the analysis of data.

This module will give students the opportunity to explore how research works and is communicated within food science and human nutrition, with an overall aim of developing students who are competent junior researchers.

More information

AP0536 -

Study Abroad (Optional,120 Credits)

This study abroad module is designed for standard full-time undergraduate programmes to provide you with the option to take an additional one year study abroad within your programme.

Study abroad provides an opportunity to develop personal skills in a different learning environment with a partner university. The module does not affect the classification of your degree, but if successfully passed the study abroad year is recognised in your transcript and degree certificate. There is a competitive selection process for placements and places cannot be guaranteed.

More information

AP0616 -

Biological and Food Sciences Research Project (Core,40 Credits)

You will learn how to plan a literature investigation on a specific research topic, exploit appropriate sources and databases to search for information, evaluate and critically review the primary literature articles and assess their significance in the broader context, evaluate experimentation protocols required to carry out the proposed research, conduct experiments in a safe and effective manner and discuss the validity and significance of the data provided, present the project work in the form of an oral presentation and written report in an appropriate style and format.

More information

AP0617 -

Product Development and Sensory Analysis (Core,20 Credits)

You will learn some of the fundamental theoretical principles in the field of food marketing and complement that with processes related to new product development and innovation in the food industry. Current and future trends in food production will be discussed and complemented with a group research project.
You will also learn and employ practical skills and techniques pertinent to the development and assessment of new food products. Theoretical knowledge on food ingredients, food market and innovation drivers will be translated into a practical assignment with the aim to develop an innovative products.
You will learn about key theoretical and practical concepts in sensory analysis of foodstuffs and complement that with workshops on data analysis and statistics pertinent to sensory data.
You will gain insights in Good Manufacturing Practice, workflows pertinent to New Product Development teams and practical experience in running product trials.

More information

AP0618 -

Food and Nutrition - Policy and Issues (Core,20 Credits)

In this module you will reflect on current issues in the ever-changing world of food science and nutrition. The pace of development and change in the field will mean that the syllabus will change, evolve and respond to contemporary issues. The module will identify the scope of food policy, and assess who influences policy, inter-relationships and the dynamics that shape policy. It will allow you to understand and evaluate what is meant by policy in the food system, from farm to fork, and introduce major themes and key thinkers in food policy. The module will explore issues which impact at a global level, from Millennium Development Goals to environmental effect of food waste. You will review and assess current policies and develop your awareness of the following aspects:
Policy making process(es)
Policy in the UK, EU and world-wide
Food policy
Public health policy
Political influence

You will also increase your understanding of major trends in a consumer driven food system to include, economic and social factors across the wide spectrum of consumer groups. The emphasis of this aspect of the module will be in developing your on-going inquiry into the issues which will impact both on food industry and consumers and evaluation of the role of the media in communicating information of this type to the population.

More information

AP0619 -

Food Quality and Safety (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn the principles and practices involved in the maintenance of quality and safety within the food industry.
You will learn about the concept and value of quality assurance and quality control procedures in the production of food. You will develop an understanding of recognised quality and safety systems such as International Standards Organisation (ISO) and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point (HACCP).
You will also learn how to apply your theoretical knowledge in the setting up of HACCP systems and prepare and present the documentation associated with HACCP.
You will be able to differentiate between quality assurance and quality control and discuss the importance of quality systems in satisfying the requirements of both legislation and the needs of the consumer.
You will be able to appraise the Health and Safety risks associated with the production of food and prepare and present the documentation associated with H&S risk assessment.

More information

AP0620 -

Food Processing and Preservation (Optional,20 Credits)

You will learn the principles and practices involved in the food processing with emphasis to food preservation. Food processing operations are central to food quality, safety and product shelf life and via participation in the module you will learn about the relationship between processes and product quality and safety as well as appreciate how food processing may change the organoleptic and nutritional characteristics of food substances in addition to the effects on storage life.
You will learn the principles and applications of the most frequently used food processing operations within the food industry such as freezing drying and thermal processing i.e. pasteurisation and sterilization.
You will be introduced in more advanced food processing operations such as membrane processing, high pressure processing and ohmic heating. These novel food processes are securing significant product quality improvements over conventional methods and thus have already found their way into food industry practises.
The module is designed to enable you understand the combined effects of ingredients and processing on the quality of processed products and teach you how to apply knowledge of micro-organisms to an understanding of the principles of food preservation.
You will also learn how to conduct numerical calculations needed to understand the basis of processes and use necessary numerical calculations, formulae and graphical methods to assess the efficiency of a process.

More information

AP0621 -

Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed to develop an understanding of the principles of clinical nutrition, dietary intervention and treatment strategies. You will learn about the biochemical basis of a range of disorders that are seen in the clinic.
You will learn about how to assess nutritional status using anthropometric, clinical and biochemical data and how these relate to case studies and nutrition-related to disease. You will learn how each clinical or metabolic disorder influences nutritional status, and the underlying metabolic complications that cause these conditions will be highlighted.
You will learn about the principles of dietetics, dietary management and control in the clinical environment. You will learn how clinical conditions can influence nutritional status and how these conditions are treated through adequate nutrition.

More information

AP0622 -

Investigative Sport and Exercise Nutrition (Optional,20 Credits)

This module is designed to develop an understanding of the principles and applications of nutritional interventions in the context of sport and exercise performance and health outcomes.
You will learn about the scientific evidence behind health claims associated with dietary interventions, the use of ergogenic aids and other supplementation through critical evaluation. You will learn about the effects and detection of drugs and doping agents within sport.. In addition, the role of the nutritionist in practice will be reviewed in accordance with external guidelines/codes of conduct for nutrition professionals.

More information

To start your application, simply select the month you would like to start your course.

Food Science and Nutrition BSc (Hons)

Home or EU applicants please apply through UCAS

International applicants please apply using the links below

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Northumbria Open Days

Open Days are a great way for you to get a feel of the University, the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and the course(s) you are interested in.

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Virtual Tour

Get an insight into life at Northumbria at the click of a button! Come and explore our videos and 360 panoramas to immerse yourself in our campuses and get a feel for what it is like studying here using our interactive virtual tour.

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