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Our Criminology and Forensic Science course is taught by research-active criminologists and experienced former forensic practitioners and will give you an insight into the study of crime and its investigation within the criminal justice system.

The course has two distinct themes – the criminological theme covers the theory of crime, how society is policed and the issues and alternatives to custodial sentencing. The forensic science theme addresses the scientific theory and practical techniques that are used in crime scene examination and the laboratory to allow you to locate, examine and interpret evidential material for the courtroom. In doing so you will be provided with significant hands-on laboratory experience in, for example, analytical chemistry, blood pattern interpretation, DNA analysis and fibre examination.

95% of students say that staff are good at explaining things and are enthusiastic about what they are teaching (National Student Survey, 2016)

You will have the opportunity to undertake a one-year placement within the scientific field after the second year of study.

This course is designed to support and inspire you to high achievement and professionalism in your future career. Building on fundamental knowledge and laboratory skills, you will develop into an independent graduate who can tackle complex problems with confidence, skill and maturity.

The course is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences.

Our Criminology and Forensic Science course is taught by research-active criminologists and experienced former forensic practitioners and will give you an insight into the study of crime and its investigation within the criminal justice system.

The course has two distinct themes – the criminological theme covers the theory of crime, how society is policed and the issues and alternatives to custodial sentencing. The forensic science theme addresses the scientific theory and practical techniques that are used in crime scene examination and the laboratory to allow you to locate, examine and interpret evidential material for the courtroom. In doing so you will be provided with significant hands-on laboratory experience in, for example, analytical chemistry, blood pattern interpretation, DNA analysis and fibre examination.

95% of students say that staff are good at explaining things and are enthusiastic about what they are teaching (National Student Survey, 2016)

You will have the opportunity to undertake a one-year placement within the scientific field after the second year of study.

This course is designed to support and inspire you to high achievement and professionalism in your future career. Building on fundamental knowledge and laboratory skills, you will develop into an independent graduate who can tackle complex problems with confidence, skill and maturity.

The course is accredited by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences.

Course Information

UCAS Code
MF94

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
3 years full-time or 4 years with a placement (sandwich)

Department
Applied Sciences

Location
Ellison Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

Department / Applied Sciences

The Department of Applied Sciences has an exciting and extensive portfolio of subjects including biology, biomedical sciences, chemistry, forensic science, food and nutritional sciences.

Book an Open Day / Experience Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Criminology and Forensic Science. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The early stages of the course are designed to give you a solid theoretical and practical grounding in the key science areas and criminological theory applicable to the degree. This foundation is built on in subsequent years as you develop natural curiosity and critical thinking, ensuring greater independent learning and thought.

You will develop critical thinking skills and the ability to present clearly supported/evidence-based opinions as you progress through the course. The problem-based approach to teaching establishes these skills at an early stage and culminates in the final year project in your chosen specialism.

Criminology and Forensic Science Student Profiles

Hear what it is really like to study our Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons) from our current students.

Book an Open Day / Experience Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Criminology and Forensic Science. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Our teaching team are active researchers in their chosen specialisms who routinely incorporate their expertise and enthusiasm into their teaching. Many of the forensic staff have worked in forensic science laboratories and have been involved in high profile cases such as the Suffolk Strangler and the murder of Joanna Yeates. Specialisms include drugs and toxicology, the analysis of textile fibres and their transfer and persistence, DNA profiling and ancient DNA analysis. They are well-established within professional forensic science societies and organisations, which directly inform policy and practices within the field, and continue to maintain close links with the industry, including the police, acting as consultants in cases of major crime.

Our criminology staff play leading roles within professional associations such as the British Society of Criminology and the Academy of the Social Sciences, and serve on the editorial boards of leading disciplinary journals. Their research interests include criminal justice systems, policy mobilities, policing, mental health offenders and green crime.

All our academic research is internationally recognised and embedded into the design and delivery of every module, ensuring your learning is at the forefront of developments within the criminology and forensic science sector.

Staff / Meet the Team

Our students learn from the best inspirational academic staff with a genuine passion for their subject. Our courses are at the forefront of current knowledge and practice and are shaped by world-leading and internationally excellent research.

Book an Open Day / Experience Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Criminology and Forensic Science. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Northumbria University has invested heavily in an impressive suite of analytical equipment allowing you to gain first-hand experience of the techniques used in operational laboratories. You will have access to a bespoke crime scene house for crime scene investigations and a former magistrates’ court to participate in mock court sessions. Students can also access Return to Scene (R2S) software which provides a 360 degree interactive scan of a crime scene allowing you to perform further analysis in detail.

Technology enabled learning is embedded throughout the course including apps and the eLearning Portal, digital reading lists, self-assessment and formal electronic assessments.

The 24/7 University Library achieves some of the highest levels of student satisfaction in the UK and has held the Cabinet Office accreditation for Customer Service Excellence since 2010.

  

Applied Sciences Facilities

The Department of Applied Sciences has modern laboratory and computing resources for learning, teaching, research, innovation and business engagement.

Virtual Tour

Come and explore our outstanding facilities in this interactive virtual tour.

University Library

At the heart of each Northumbria campus, our libraries provide a range of study space and technology to suit every learning style.

Book an Open Day / Experience Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Criminology and Forensic Science. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Research informs all aspects of the course, and many lecturers incorporate their own research into teaching to ensure that content is current and relevant.

Northumbria University Centre for Forensic Science (NUFCS) and the Northumbria Centre for Crime and Justice are established research centres within the University, dedicated to pushing the frontiers of knowledge in forensic science and criminology. Their findings are regularly included in taught material, maintaining the contemporary nature of the course.


Book an Open Day / Experience Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Criminology and Forensic Science. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The course has a strong industry-related focus. It includes an optional one-year work placement, STEM ambassador activities, volunteering activities within the local communities, work-based learning and/or study abroad. We offer an innovative approach to work-based learning with an emphasis on problem-solving. The curriculum has been specifically designed to enhance your subject knowledge and practical skills while providing opportunities for personal and professional development.

Your positive attitude, ethics and approach is developed through team working, independent learning, professional practice and volunteering opportunities. You will graduate able to articulately and effectively communicate with a wide range of audiences through a variety of platforms.

 

Student Life

A great social scene can be found at the heart of our campuses, featuring award-winning bars and a huge range of clubs and societies to join you'll be sure to meet people who share your enthusiasms.

Book an Open Day / Experience Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Criminology and Forensic Science. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

The fundamental practices and procedures of criminology and forensic science, together with logical thinking, attention to detail and a questioning mind, establish transferable skills to a range of careers and disciplines. Confidence, developed through intellectual curiosity, practical and theoretical problem solving, enables criminology and forensic science graduates to respectively interact in professional arenas.

Many of our recent alumni now work in roles within the police, forensic science laboratories and analytical chemistry laboratories, criminal justice and social work settings, or in varied careers in teaching, research, local and national government and third sector employment. Others have moved on to postgraduate study.

Book an Open Day / Experience Criminology and Forensic Science BSc (Hons)

Visit an Open Day to get an insight into what it's like to study Criminology and Forensic Science. Speak to staff and students from the course and get a tour of the facilities.

Course in brief

Who would this Course suit?

Are you fascinated by forensic science, and interested in how societies respond to crime? This course is ideal for anyone with a critical, enquiring mind and an interest in the causes of crime, its policing within the criminal justice system and the scientific principles and practical techniques used in the investigation of crime.

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths, English Language and a Science at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level:

From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels 

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit 

Scottish Highers:

BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher 

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.<

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications</

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

Throughout your course you will incur costs for materials; these may include a spatula and a glass marker pen. Optionally, you can purchase additional books which could range between approximately £100-£200.

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

AP0400 -

Practical Skills in Forensic Science (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will cover the basic scientific knowledge and practical skills required of a scientist. Topics will include microscopy, required mathematical calcllations, basic laboratory skills such as use of Gilson pipettes, practices of documenting forensic examinations, scientific report writing and referencing and presentation skills.

More information

AP0401 -

Process and Practices in Forensic Science (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will provide you with an understanding of the key principles, practice and processes of forensic science. You will gain an understanding of the role of a forensic scientist and appreciate the types of evidence that they examine as well as other key stakeholders. You will understand the importance of the continuity and integrity of exhibits from scene to court, understand the deposition and transfer and persistence of materials and you will develop your practical skills with search and recovery techniques. You will also develop observational and note taking skills aligned to a forensic examination. Unseen examination and a practical assessment will assess your knowledge, understanding and skills associated with the key principles of forensic science.

More information

AP0418 -

Fundamentals of Biology and Chemistry (Core, 20 Credits)

On this module you will learn the fundamental principles of biology and chemistry required to provide the necessary background level of understanding for progression onto second year of study when the basic science is applied to forensic specialisms such as toxicology, trace evidence analysis and DNA profiling. Topics covered on this module will include:
• Anatomy and physiology
• Cell biology
• Genetics
• Fundamental chemistry principles
• Chemical extraction and sample preparation techniques
• Analytical techniques

More information

CR4001 -

Explaining Crime: An Introduction to Criminology (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module you will be introduced to the study of crime, the core themes and issues associated with criminological knowledge and methods of enquiry, as well as the key issues and debates within the discipline of criminology.
Weekly lectures and seminars will provide you with the knowledge and skills needed to introduce you to key issues in the definition and conceptualisation of crime, deviance and control; to situate the study of crime and criminology within the interior and exterior contexts of theory, research, policy and practice; to provide an understanding of some key perspectives, approaches and methods of studying crime and criminology; and to allow you to undertake study on all aspects of the module culminating in 1. writing an essay and 2. producing a group poster presentation, which together will demonstrate your detailed knowledge and understanding of one particular type of crime, and how you might use one particular theory to explain why people commit this crime type.

More information

CR4002 -

Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (Core, 20 Credits)

Criminal justice is rarely out of the news: there is a regular stream of stories alleging that conditions in prisons are too comfortable, that the courts are not handing out sufficiently harsh sentences, that people are being released from prison when they are still a danger to society, that young offenders can ignore the law and that police officers have been involved in misconduct. In this module you will look behind the headlines and understand what the agencies of the criminal justice system do, the constraints that they operate under and the historical developments that led to their current situation. You will go on a journey through criminal justice from arrest by the police, to the decision to prosecute and appearing in court, to punishment either in prison or the community and (in the case of the most serious offences) release from prison by the parole board. You will also consider elements of criminal justice that fall outside this process: the promotion of community safety, the system for dealing with young people who offend and the method of correcting injustices that are associated with criminal justice agencies.

More information

CR4004 -

Victims and Victimisation (Core, 20 Credits)

Talk about crime often focuses on the offender – what they have done, why they have done it, what we happen to them and so on – almost to the point where the victims of crime is overlooked or even ignored altogether. Criminologists, for instance, have often been accused of this. Similarly, it is often argued that the criminal justice system has paid limited attention to victims of crime in their pursuit of ‘catching criminals’. In this module, however, you will consider these arguments and shed light on the vitally important aspects of crime: the victim of crime, the wider processes of victimisation, and the service provision for victims of crime. In doing this, you will explore the expanding work in the sub-discipline of criminology called victimology, and focus on three key issues: (1) the influence of social variables – such as class, age, race, gender and sexuality – on victimisation, (2) the relationship between victims and witnesses of crime; and (3) contemporary case studies – such as sex work, human trafficking, cyber-victimisation and hate crime – to see how victimisation operates within these issues.

More information

JE5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Applied Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

AP0501 -

Research Methods (Core, 20 Credits)

Your learning on this module will be situated within the ethical, social and legal implications associated with forensic science’s contribution to crime investigation and research. You will learn how to effectively design, conduct and review academic research – skills that are relevant and transferable to 2nd and final year academic study.

As part of the module you will learn how to:
• effectively search and use e-literacy techniques to enable you to critically analyse academic literature relevant to forensic science and associated disciplines.
• undertake quantitative and qualitative methods of research such as experimental data and statistics, interviews, focus groups and observations.
• effectively communicate your opinions whilst also acknowledging the work of others through appropriate citation and evidence of wider reading.
• review and consider the requirements and expectations of a scientist to ensure your own research is ethical, safe, peer reviewed and statistically supported.

Your learning will take place within the practice and research of forensic science. As such, you will be required to demonstrate an appreciation of the differing ethical implications associated with real world crime investigation and the constraints that impact and influence laboratory based and desk based research.

More information

AP0532 -

Harmonisation of criminology and forensic science in the Criminal Justice System (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn how criminological theories have developed in contemporary society. You will also learn how these theories can be applied to complement scientific strategies associated with crimes and challenges facing the Police and Criminal Justice System. You will discover the impact these advancements have upon both society and upon forensic science. By understanding crime, contemporary policing, prisons and imprisonment within the criminal justice system, crime prevention strategies will be evaluated for their effectiveness for particular crime types. For example, you will explore current research and innovation strategies that combine innovative science and technological advances with criminological research in response to existing, new and emerging crimes and challenges. You will address key themes such as:
• Crime/policing – e.g. the prevention and detection of drugs in society, volume crime, human trafficking
• Security and counter terrorism – e.g. prevention and detection of terrorism activities (domestic versus international), radicalisation and
• Policing/identity management – e.g. surveillance in society, crime mapping and the role of biometric identification

More information

AP0533 -

Core Disciplines in Forensic Science (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn the theory, knowledge and practical application of the core disciplines within forensic science. You will cover the identification, application and subsequent interpretation of trace material, toxicology, body fluids and DNA within the context of a forensic investigation. You will gain an appreciation of the complexity of differing case types, such as murder or burglary, and understand that each requires a different forensic strategy that is bespoke to the individual case, depending on what exhibits are available for examination and what needs to be established. You will apply case assessment and interpretation theory to enable you to develop a fit for purpose forensic strategy appropriate to a given case example. By the end of this module you will have an overall comprehension of how forensic science can aid and support a crime investigation.

More information

CR5002 -

Crime, Media and Film (Optional, 20 Credits)

On this cutting edge module, you will explore the intriguing yet complex relationship between crime, media and film. The module will explore the ways in which factual and fictional accounts of crime are produced, distributed and consumed. Using contemporary examples and drawing on the criminological literature, it will begin by critically examining the changing ways in which crime news is made, how victims, offenders and criminal justice agencies are represented in the news, and the effects crime news has on society. The module will then critically analyse a variety of fictional sources such as television dramas, novels, video games, comics and focus in particular on films where crime is central. Here it will explore both classic and contemporary films, considering the ways in which crime, its causes, consequences and the cities in which the films are situated are represented and the reasons behind this.

More information

CR5003 -

Gender, Crime and Victimisation (Optional, 20 Credits)

In societies across the globe crime and victimisation is unevenly spread with distinct patterns to offending for different crime types being evidenced in results from various types of crimes surveys and other types of research data. Men and women perpetrate crime and experience criminal victimisation in distinctive ways. This module examines how crime and the process of criminalisation and social controls are gendered and how gender impacts upon and influences the experiences and recovery from crime and victimisation in society. You will be exploring how gender:

• mediates the patterns to, as well as our concerns and fears about, crime and victimisation - especially sexual violence;
• shapes how crime is reported and made visible in different public, private and institutional locations and settings;
• has impacted upon how criminologists explain why crime happens and how it should be dealt with;
• contributes to how victims and witnesses experience the criminal justice system;

In viewing the crime and victimisation problem through a gendered lens, you will learn how specific conceptualisations of masculinity and femininity are played out in news media reporting of crime and victimisation and in the criminal justice system. In examining all of the above you will also be considering whether and when gender matters most in understanding crime and the experience and recovery from victimisation.

More information

CR5004 -

Policing and Regulation (Core, 20 Credits)

Historically, it can be argued that the social sciences have paid little attention to those stages in the criminalisation process which intervene between legislation and the application of penal measures to the convicted offender. Specifically, systematic and critical analysis and research into policing and law enforcement agencies only emerged and developed during the second half of the twentieth century. Indeed, it was an epistemological break during the 1960s which first opened the intellectual floodgates to the study of policing. Since then, the nature of policing has radically evolved and expanded – with an increased scrutiny of the public police, considerable growth of private security, and the formal regulation of goods, services and people. It is these contemporary parameters of policing and regulation, through a critical examination of contemporary theory, empirical, policy and practice perspectives that inform the content of this module.

The module is split into four parts:

Part 1 is concerned with laying the theoretical foundation needed to develop a critical understanding of policing and regulation. Here you will explore the differences between ‘the police’ and ‘policing’ and ‘regulation’ and you will examine some of the key sociological theories and concepts that attempt to rationalise these formal mechanisms in society e.g. risk, Marxism, neoliberalism and globalisation.

In Part 2, you will learn all about public policing in England and Wales. You will track the historical development of the public police and explore the social, economic and political developments that have shaped the role and function, structure and accountability frameworks. You will examine key stakeholders, different models of policing, and contemporary reform initiatives. You will also compare the public police in England and Wales with other jurisdictions (to include Scotland and Northern Ireland).

Part 3 you will focus on the growth of private security and organisations involved in policing beyond the public police. You will examine reasons for this growth and critically explore some of the contemporary challenges. You will also learn about hybrid models of policing where public and private police provisions work collaboratively.

In Part 4, examples of increased regulation in society will be scrutinised. You will examine the regulation of people (e.g. through immigration mechanisms; environmental/climate quotas); goods (e.g. drugs; counterfeit items and animals); and service (e.g. sex work). The correlation between regulation and policing will be explored.

More information

CR5005 -

Prisons and Punishment (Core, 20 Credits)

Punishing people for breaking the law is clearly one of the most important elements of the criminal justice system. But how are people punished? Why are people punished? Is punishment really the best way to change people’s future behaviour?

This is an important module for all students studying any aspect of criminology, and it will ask you to think about whether and how different penal theories (ideas about punishment) are practised in the UK and around the globe. For example, is it possible to have an effective criminal justice system that has elements of both retributive and reparative justice? How might these possibly competing ideas work in harmony? Can we punish people for the things that they have done wrong, while at the same time try to get people to address their offending behaviour?

We will then explore the role and emergence of the modern prison in England and Wales. We will look at internal cultures and organisation of prisons and community sentences. We will consider how they are managed and inspected, and how news about the state of prisons is communicated to the ‘outside’ world. Most importantly we will consider the impact on prisoners and offenders of policy changes over the last 50 years. This will include comparing styles of policy and practice in Europe (including looking at Nordic exceptionalism), the ‘Americanisation’ of the penal system, and the role of privatisation on prisons and community sentences.

More information

CR5008 -

Youth Crime and Deviance (Optional, 20 Credits)

The principal aim of this module is to provide you with historical, theoretical and comparative perspectives of diverse forms of youth culture, crime and deviance. It will expose you to a diverse range of empirically based research studies from social science disciplines and illustrate the connection to deeper critical understandings of youth crime and deviance and subcultural analysis to that of wider social/moral/economic and cultural contexts in which they are received and interacted with. In this module, we explore the grounded knowledge and theoretical concepts relating to youth, youth style, popular music and subcultures, youth resistance and youth crime and deviance through historical and late-modern perspectives.

More information

AP0541 -

Criminology and Forensic Science Placement (Optional, 120 Credits)

There is currently no summary for this module.

AP0603 -

Advanced Forensic Investigation (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn how advances in forensic science can be applied to major crime investigation. You will learn how to use the casework assessment and interpretation (CAI) model in the intelligence and evaluated phases of the investigation of crime, as well as the use of Baysian statistics to evaluate the strength of evidence and the conclusions/limitations that can be drawn from the analytical results. Embedded throughout the module will be case studies from violent, sexual and major crime used to supplement and underpin your learning.

More information

AP0628 -

Advanced Specialisms in Forensic Science (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will enable you to specialise in a particular area of forensic science, choosing from: trace evidence; drugs and toxicology or forensic genetics. As part of your studies you will demonstrate deeper theoretical knowledge and greater practical skill in the application and methodology of your chosen field. You will evaluate and critically appraise the scientific advances in your chosen field and their importance to crime investigation. Your practical and transferable laboratory skills will be strengthened in your chosen topic as you undertake bespoke experimentation to recover material and assess its significance. As part of your assessment you will evaluate both the theoretical and practical application of your chosen area within the context of crime investigation – considering the professional, social and legal issues where appropriate.

More information

AP0629 -

Interdisciplinary Criminology and Forensic Science Dissertation (Core, 40 Credits)

This module will provide you with an opportunity to independently review and evaluate a research question that encompasses both the criminological and scientific disciplines. You will independently examine the historical and contemporary theories that are currently applied to explaining crime from the perspective of the victim, offender and the environment. You will evaluate the effectiveness of the subsequent prevention strategies and appraise how these are complemented by the scientific and innovative technological approaches to detect crime. In doing so, you will adopt a critical and analytical approach to support innovative solutions for regulating, policing, preventing and detecting crime.

With the support of a dissertation supervisor within each discipline, you will seek to develop and answer a research question using research enquiry and tutored based techniques, for example collecting your own data, using existing data sets or by engaging in an analysis of the research literature. You will apply your information retrieval and critical appraisal skills with discussion of your results culminating in the production of a written dissertation that appraises criminological theory and scientific practice.

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CR6001 -

Concepts and Patterns of Organised Crime (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce and critically explore the manifestation of organised criminal activities that have embedded themselves within an increasingly globalised political economy, whilst not ignoring the essentially localised functions of indigenous enterprise crime. In order to explore the concepts and patterns of organised crime an inter-disciplinary social scientific approach will be adopted that critically evaluates the historical, criminological and sociological approaches upon the assessment of organised criminal activities.

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CR6002 -

Contemporary Policing and Security (Optional, 20 Credits)

From being a relatively marginal political issue, modern policing and security has risen rapidly up the social and political agendas of western societies. As inequalities have increased, so the actual and perceived risks of crime and other social ills have grown rapidly for all sections of society: the management of crime has become a central concern.

In this module you will develop your critical understanding, analysis and interpretation of the key themes, theories, issues and political debates concerning the development and contemporary nature of modern policing and the delivery of security in England and Wales. Where appropriate, you will be directed to comparative material from other countries and our discussions will draw upon these comparative dimensions to contemporary policing and security.

Given the ‘contemporary’ nature of this module and the continually evolving nature of policing and security, the content of this module is revised each year. Examples of topics covered in previous years include:
• The changing role and function of the police
• Policing and Mental Health
• Terrorism and Insecurity
• Technology, Surveillance and Society
• Policing Globalisation
• Victimology and Policing
• Conducting Research in Policing and Security Settings

More information

CR6004 -

Crimes of the Powerful (Optional, 20 Credits)

Crime just doesn’t happen on the streets. It takes place in homes, in offices, in natural habitats – places hidden from view and scrutiny. Often it is kept hidden because of powerful actors. You will examine a range of criminal and harmful behaviours, as well as deviant and anti-social activities under the organising theme ‘crimes of the powerful’. The module situates and understands crimes and victimisations within a framework where questions of structural relationships and personal power in society are key to why some crime is visible and some is not. You will be expected to challenge orthodox representations of crime and demonstrate an intellectual openness to new ideas, whilst adopting a critical and analytical approach to the control, regulation and prevention of invisible and hidden crimes and/or victimisations.

More information

CR6005 -

Doing Time: The Prison Experience (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will get the opportunity to address a range of issues and ethical dilemmas that derive from the 'real world' of applied methods and strategies of penal intervention. Considerations of class, gender and ethnicity constitute key aspects of the conceptual framework and the principles of 'security, control and justice' are critically examined in the operational context.

The module will encourage you to pay particular attention to the diversity of experience, response and adaptation of those subjected to the varied sanctions within the penal system. Power imbalance and the relationships of authority, discipline and coercion are central issues within the overall perspective. Important areas included for discussion and debate are: young people, foreign national and ethnic minority prisoners, life-sentence prisoners; the treatment of vulnerable prisoners and mentally disordered offenders in penal and other 'controlling' institutions. Human Rights legislation in the prison context will also be critically analysed

.

The lecture programme will introduce you to topics and the seminars will provide opportunities to take forward discussion in depth. Assessment is by a 4,000 word project which is based upon a particular type of prison (100%). You will be able to choose from a number of different types of prisons and to demonstrate how their chosen prison type reflects on the wider question of the relationship between the prison and the prisoner experience.

More information

CR6006 -

Green Crime (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the emerging and competing perspectives and frameworks regarding the neglected topic of crimes and harms against the environment. In a module offered at very few universities, you are introduced to the philosophies and perspectives of Green Criminology. You will develop skills that enable you to critically analyse notions of crime and harm, and social and ecological justice in relation to deforestation, wildlife, pollution, and many other areas that pertain to green and environmental crime and victimisation. While honing verbal and written skills, this module will give you the working knowledge to discuss the type, scope, and impacts of green crimes and harms and how this is different from street and ‘traditional’ volume crimes. This module provides a fresh new area of criminological scholarship which you will contribute to in discussion and debate with the module tutors and fellow students - examining crime from new and cutting edge perspectives.

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CR6007 -

Mentally Disordered Offenders (Optional, 20 Credits)

Mentally disordered offenders: “mad, bad and dangerous to know”? During this module you will begin to explore who ‘they’ are, what ‘they’ do, why we are afraid of ‘them’, how we identify ‘them’ and what we are doing about ‘them’.
You will learn about and critique mentally disordered offender theory and practice, including: developing a critical understanding to the concept of ‘mentally disordered offenders’; the links between mental disorder and crime; the links between the mass media and the public in the development of the concept of the ‘dangerous offender’; the development of Forensic Psychiatry and its impact on the concept of ‘risk’ and ‘risk assessment’; and a critical assessment of the impact of policy developments on approaches to the care and/or control of mentally disordered offenders.

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CR6008 -

Restoration, Rehabilitation and Desistance (Optional, 20 Credits)

Do children who break the law always turn into adult offenders? What might help someone change their behaviour? Is it always the impact of a criminal justice intervention that makes someone desist from crime? This module will look at all of these questions.

The first part will track the nature and complexity of criminal careers. It will demonstrate different ways in which offenders come to be engaged in crime and the extent to which starting early is a predictor of a criminal career. After considering the different ways in which criminal careers are sustained and developed, you will look at the interventions criminal justice and aligned organisations put in place to change offenders’ behaviour.

We will investigate forms of restorative justice and reparation, and question whether, and how, they might fit within different criminal justice systems around the world. For example, what might the role of ‘circles of support’ be in a risk adverse society? The module will also look at whether some activities in prison might have a role in desistance after release. For example are creative, artistic, spiritual and sporting activities a hook for changing offending behaviour after release?

Throughout the module we will consider UK and international criminal justice practice, and question the impact of social, political and cultural contexts of restoration, rehabilitation and desistance. You will be encouraged to explore all of these elements from cultural and critical criminological perspectives.

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