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The MComp (Hons) Computer Science with Games Development is an integrated masters course for those interested in taking their enthusiasm for computing to degree level and beyond. Our course covers a broad range of computing specialisms and will open the door to a vast range of careers within this industry.

From day one, you will be immersed in an exciting, innovative environment where you will develop your theoretical and technical knowledge and skills which will be directly relatable to your future career.

This course has been developed to meet the demand for skilled individuals who understand how computers work and who have a desire to work for a games development studio after graduation. This course aims to provide you with a deep knowledge of the principles of computer science, enhanced by specialist skills in developing computer games.

Northumbria is ranked 5th in the sector nationally and 1st in the North East for the sustained employment of Computer Science graduates one year after graduation. (Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) 2017)

The MComp (Hons) Computer Science with Games Development is an integrated masters course for those interested in taking their enthusiasm for computing to degree level and beyond. Our course covers a broad range of computing specialisms and will open the door to a vast range of careers within this industry.

From day one, you will be immersed in an exciting, innovative environment where you will develop your theoretical and technical knowledge and skills which will be directly relatable to your future career.

This course has been developed to meet the demand for skilled individuals who understand how computers work and who have a desire to work for a games development studio after graduation. This course aims to provide you with a deep knowledge of the principles of computer science, enhanced by specialist skills in developing computer games.

Northumbria is ranked 5th in the sector nationally and 1st in the North East for the sustained employment of Computer Science graduates one year after graduation. (Longitudinal Education Outcomes (LEO) 2017)

Course Information

UCAS Code
G406

Level of Study
Undergraduate

Mode of Study
4 years full-time or 5 years with a placement (sandwich)/study abroad

Department
Computer and Information Sciences

Location
Pandon Building, Newcastle City Campus

City
Newcastle

Start
September 2019

In your first two years you will follow a core programme of study, allowing you to gain knowledge and skills in different aspects of computer science.

After an optional placement or study abroad year, you will be taught advanced skills in games design and development, including the architecture of games software, games design, programming a games console and the creation of a 3D game demo. You’ll also have the opportunity to work with specialist games content developed in collaboration with local games companies, all with the aim of extending your programming and software engineering skills further.

Your final year will be your Masters-level year, when you will work in advanced areas, and continue your choice of specialism, allowing you to gain the skills that set you apart from the rest. 

Your assessments are designed to help you develop the knowledge, understanding and skills required of a computer science graduate. You will be assessed through a variety of different methods including exams, reports, presentations, individual, group and project work.

You will be taught by a range of academic staff who bring a wealth of professional experience from the computer science industry. Coupled with wider technical knowledge, whereby the staff have published work in prestigious authored journals, you will be taught the essential skills you need to succeed in your future career.

In a dynamic learning environment with an expert team of staff, you will be taught theoretical and practical research skills such as information literacy, as well as problem solving skills around project management, self-directed learning and communication skills. You will develop an understanding of important research methods and approaches which could be directly relatable to the demands of future career.  

caption: Learn from the best

You will be provided with a wide range of learning opportunities in a challenging, stimulating and dynamic quality learning environment.

On the Computer Science with Games Development course, you will have the opportunity to access state of the art facilities and equipment which will encourage your individual intellectual freedom and allow your creative vision to become a reality.

You will have access to dedicated Games and Video studios and open access computing areas which students can use during free periods and into the evenings and weekends.

When you want to get hands-on with technology and really understand how everything connects, how to create games or protect data integrity, our range of specialist facilities will support you.

caption: University Library   caption: Our Facilities

We are living in a digital age where all of our lives are impacted by computer sciences and digital technologies, from cyber security and computational intelligence to games and visual effects. You will be immersed in a research-rich environment with new and exciting insights into the discipline by our rapidly expanding Computer Science research groups.

You will be taught by staff with a strong academic background in areas such as, Computational Linguistics, Web Programming and Informational Visualisation. With access to diverse research work carried out by our expert academic staff, we seek to promote innovative and excellent learning and teaching practice, which will improve your student experience here at Northumbria.

In a dynamic learning environment with an expert team of staff, you will be taught theoretical and practical research skills such as information literacy, as well as problem solving skills around project management, self-directed learning and communication skills. 


caption: University Research  caption: Department Research

For those with high career aspirations, this integrated Masters course can give you an extra edge in today’s competitive job market.

Here at Northumbria, we know how valuable work experience can be in terms of giving you a head start in your career so we enable you to gain real-world experience on a yearlong professional placement in your third year on this course.

Previous computer science students have had the opportunity to go on a placement in blue chip companies such as Hewett Packard and GlaxoSmithKline and at CERN in Geneva. CERN has doubled the number of students it will take on placement, reflecting the respect and value placed on this degree by prestigious industry professionals.

You will also have the opportunity to study abroad in your third year at a partner institution, enabling you to gain global perspective on your subject and boost your future career prospects.

caption: Plan your career

This course covers a broad range of computing specialisms and will open the door to a vast range of careers within this industry.  Our existing games graduates are employed in a wide range of games companies in the UK and overseas, varying from small start-ups to triple-A studios.

We place a real emphasis on developing the transferable skills that will open doors to a range of careers in computer science. These include communication, analytical and problem solving skills, technical skills and the ability to work independently and as part of a team.

As a computer science graduate, you could enter a career in areas such as games development, software engineering, systems analysis and design, computer networks, database development and management, software testing, artificial intelligence, and web development.

Course in brief

Your course in brief

Year 1

Year one This year you will be introduced to core computer programming concepts and languages and you will also focus on the analysis, design and building of software and begin to develop online systems.

Year 2

Year two You will complete a variety of programming tasks, projects and assignments relating to concepts such as operating systems, computer networks and control systems, software engineering, machine learning and computer vision and developing more advanced online systems.

Year 3

Year three You have the option to go out on industrial placement to put your skills into professional practice. You can also combine a placement with overseas study at another university or study abroad for a year.

Year 4

Year four This year includes a large-scale challenging project, where you will design, analyse, develop and evaluate a production relating to the course.

Year 5

Year five Your final year will be your Masters-level year, when you will work in advanced areas and continue your choice of specialism, allowing you to gain the skills that set you apart from other graduates.

Who would this Course suit?

Are you driven by engaging, creative and meaningful experiences? Do you have a passion for computer science and want to pursue creative opportunities in games development?  Do you want to take your understanding of computer science and games development to the next level? Then this is the course for you. 

Entry Requirements 2019/20

Standard Entry

GCSE Requirements:

A good GCSE profile is expected including Maths and English Language at minimum grade C or equivalent.  If you have studied for a new GCSE for which you will be awarded a numerical grade then you will need to achieve a minimum grade 4.

UCAS Tariff Points:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including one or more of the following:

GCE and VCE Advanced Level: From at least 2 GCE/VCE A Levels 

Edexcel/BTEC National Extended Diploma:

Distinction, Distinction, Merit 

Scottish Highers: BBBCC - BBBBC at Higher level, CCC - BCC at Advanced Higher 

Irish Highers:

BBBBB  - ABBBB

IB Diploma:

120-128 UCAS Tariff points including minimum score of 4 in at least three subjects at Higher level

Access to HE Diploma:

Award of full Access to HE Diploma including 18 credits at Distinction and 27 at Merit

Qualification combinations:

The University welcomes applications from students studying qualifications from different qualification types - for example A level and a BTEC qualification in combination, and if you are made an offer you will be asked to achieve UCAS Tariff points from all of the qualifications you are studying at level 3.  Should the course you wish to study have a subject specific requirement then you must also meet this requirement, usually from GCE A level.

 

Plus one of the following:

  • International/English Language Requirements:

    Applicants from the EU:

    Applicants from the EU are welcome to apply and if the qualification you are studying is not listed here then please contact the Admissions Team for advice or see our EU Applicants pages here https://www.northumbria.ac.uk/international/european-union/eu-applications/

    International Qualifications:

    If you have studied a non UK qualification, you can see how your qualifications compare to the standard entry criteria, by selecting the country that you received the qualification in, from our country pages. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/yourcountry

    English Language Requirements:

    International applicants are required to have a minimum overall IELTS (Academic) score of 6.0 with 5.5 in each component (or approved equivalent*).

    *The university accepts a large number of UK and International Qualifications in place of IELTS. You can find details of acceptable tests and the required grades you will need in our English Language section. Visit www.northumbria.ac.uk/englishqualifications

Fees and Funding 2019/20 Entry

UK/EU Fee in Year 1**: £9,250

International Fee in Year 1: £15,000

ADDITIONAL COSTS

There are no Additional Costs

FUNDING INFORMATION

Click here for UK and EU undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for International undergraduate funding and scholarships information.

Click here for UK/EU undergraduate tuition fee information**.

Click here for International undergraduate tuition fee information.

Click here for additional costs which may be involved while studying.

Click here for information on fee liability.

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Modules Overview

Modules

Module information is indicative and is reviewed annually therefore may be subject to change. Applicants will be informed if there are any changes.

KC4000 -

Relational Databases (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to the theory and practice of relational databases. You will learn about the concept of the relational model and the creation and management of relational databases, including how to develop, query and maintain the relational model in a database management system (DBMS), e.g. Oracle, MySql, Access, in an industrial/business context. This will include the generation of queries to extract data from a database and the manipulation of data in order to convert data into information. The module will also address considerations such as user access, encryption, information security and use of profiles and roles within a DBMS

The syllabus of the module will include topics such as
• Database Fundamentals: nature, purpose, use and administration aspects
• The relational database model and design (including ERD’s and similar methodologies)
• Structured Query Language (SQL)
• Relational database management system considerations
• Information security

More information

KF4009 -

Web Technologies (Core, 20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with knowledge and skills in designing and implementing web applications, including appropriate technologies. You will develop web based applications in accordance to key web standards and user needs. The module will also emphasise the technical aspects of web development and will introduce web security issues. In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• Structured mark-up
• Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), including layout design using CSS
• Usability and accessibility, including user needs
• Information architecture
• Client-side processing
• Web serving
• Introduction to server-side programming
• Introduction to web related security issues

More information

KF4010 -

Computing Fundamentals (Core, 20 Credits)

This module aims to provide you with the theoretical and practical basis to understand the design and construction of Computer software and hardware. You will be introduced to the underlying theory of Computation and the major paradigms of Computation. This will include the concepts of software, systems and data modelling and in particular the major computational models and programming paradigms. To complement this theoretical underpinning you will also study the standard von Neumann computer architecture and von Neumann machine programming.

More information

KF4011 -

Systems Analysis (Core, 20 Credits)

The module aims to introduce you to systems analysis using an object oriented approach, including the key ideas and techniques for capturing, analysing and specifying the requirements of an information system. You will learn about approaches to information systems development, including the system development like cycle, the concepts of deliverables and models, alternative approaches (Structured and Rapid) and the techniques associated with requirements capture. This will include the requirements analysis and documentation techniques of the Unified Modelling Language (UML), such as:

• Use Case Modelling including diagrams and descriptions
• Activity Diagrams
• Class Diagrams
• Sequence Diagrams
• Modelling consistency issues

You will also learn about professional issues associated with information systems, including those involving stakeholders, adherence to standards, quality, documentation, and professional behaviour.

More information

KV4000 -

Programming 1 (Core, 20 Credits)

During this module you will learn how to create software using a programming language. You will learn to select and apply standard programming structures for appropriate situations. The module will cover the use of variables, conditions, loops, subprograms, abstraction mechanisms and structured data types.

You will practise solving problems by breaking them down into smaller tasks. As well as constructing software that works, you will also start to consider the quality of your code and produce software that is reliable and maintainable by working to professional standards. You will learn to test, debug and maintain software of an appropriate size and to manage your time in constructing well-structured software products. We will study one programming language in detail on this module.

More information

KV4001 -

Programming 2 (Core, 20 Credits)

During this module you will further develop your problem solving, programming and program design skills, introduced in the module KV4000, Programming. You will learn the principles, knowledge and skills to utilise the object-oriented programming paradigm; using an appropriate programming language to design and write object-oriented programs to process text files and build graphical user interfaces (GUIs).

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KF5002 -

Web Programming (Core, 20 Credits)

The module aims to provide you with knowledge of the principles and practice of developing dynamic, interactive web sites and applications using both server-side and client-side technologies and of issues relating to their use. This will include the retrieval and processing of structured data and its integration to create standards compliant web interfaces. The storage and manipulation of structured data, especially in relational databases, within a web based system will also be covered. A consideration of relevant security issues and methods of working with the Document Object Model (DOM) to manipulate web application interfaces will also be provided. In particular, you will cover the following topics:

• Database applications on the web and their components: database integration and database driven web based systems, database connectivity, manipulating relational database data – record insertion, updating and deletion
• Introduction to other structured data sources, e.g. XML or JSON.
• Retrieving, processing and displaying data from structured data sources to create standards compliant, device agnostic, and accessible web interfaces.
• Client-side and server-side validation of user input and other security issues. Working with user sessions
• Working with the Document Object Model (DOM) to manipulate web application interfaces.
• Asynchronous Javascript and XML (AJAX): the XMLHTTPRequest object, communicating with a web server, parsing and displaying the returned structured data.

More information

KF5008 -

Program Design and Development (Core, 20 Credits)

You will extend your understanding of system development in this module. In particular, you will cover program design issues within the context of an industry-standard approach. You will learn how to implement designs, including the selection, implementation and processing of appropriate data structures, and how to evaluate design models and appreciate the place of these models within a software development approach.

You will develop your knowledge of design by gaining understanding of the principles and concepts upon which design depends. In addition, you will learn to apply an industry-standard approach for design and employ appropriate modelling tools. You will also develop an understanding of the issues involved with the implementation of such models, including the selection and implementation of data structures.

More information

KF5012 -

Software Engineering Practice (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the principles of software engineering and the management of software engineering projects. You will apply these in the context of a small development project and relate then to your other studies. In addition, you will see how the various skills in project management and software engineering combine to aid the delivery of a successful outcome in a commercial and economic context.

The module aims to help you understand the skills required in employment (and your continuing education) in your subject area and to apply them to complete a project, achieving a level of understanding of employer requirements.

More information

KF5042 -

Intelligent Systems (Core, 20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with a broad introduction to the core areas of artificial intelligence with a focus on applications, tools and technologies used in building intelligent systems. You will learn key theoretical concepts and research advances in intelligent systems as well as state-of-the-art techniques such as knowledge representation, machine learning, data and text mining, natural language processing and understanding, and biologically inspired computing. You will learn how intelligent systems allow computers to represent, process and learn from data. You will also explore current and future applications of AI and how various AI techniques have been used to solve practical problems. Additionally, you will learn how to appropriately select from a range of AI techniques and tools to solve practical problems in different application domains. Furthermore, you will learn how to conduct performance evaluation of intelligent systems.

In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• An introduction to AI techniques, tools and applications used in intelligent systems
• Machine learning
• Biologically inspired computing
• Search, heuristics and optimisation techniques
• Data and text mining
• Natural language processing and understanding
• Data visualisation
• Selected key application areas of intelligent systems such as:
- Computer vision and digital forensics
- Biometrics, face detection and recognition
- Affective computing
- Information retrieval
- Sentiment analysis
- Intelligent robotics
- AI in games / VR / movie making

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KV5002 -

Computer Networks, Security and Operating Systems (Core, 20 Credits)

This module introduces you to the fundamentals of computer networks, security and operating systems, including: network architecture and the five-layer Internet protocol stack, processes/threads, inter-process communication, memory management, file systems, and operating systems and network security. You will study:
* network architecture: the five-layer Internet protocol stack (application, transport, network, datalink, and physical layers), switching techniques (e.g. circuit and packet), protocols (e.g. TCP, UDP, IP);
* processes and threads: concepts, use and implementation, creation and destruction, context switching, scheduling, synchronisation;
* inter-process communication: shared memory, message passing, pipes, sockets;
* memory management: memory allocation schemes, paging, virtual memory;
* file systems: file concept, file system structure and implementation, directories, free space allocation;
* operating system and network security: confidentiality, integrity, availability, threats and attacks (e.g. denial of service, spoofing, man-in-the-middle), access control, user authentication, cryptography for data and network security, secure network protocols (e.g. TLS/SSL).

More information

KV5003 -

Human Computer Interaction (Core, 20 Credits)

This module will introduce you to Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), a field of study focusing on the design of computer technology and, in particular, the interaction between humans (the users) and computers. It brings together multiple disciplines, such as computer science, the social sciences, design and human-factors engineering.

Specific topics we will cover:

User-centred design lifecycle
Understanding human capabilities (visual and auditory perception, ergonomics, cognitive models); Social models that inform interaction design, e.g., culture, communication, networks and organizations; Accessibility
Understanding context: Requirements capture methods
Understanding design: Usability heuristics and evaluation; User interface standards
Interface paradigms and metaphors; Principles of good interface design
Prototyping techniques for interface design
Evaluation methods: expert appraisal and user-led
Human Factors and Security in interface design

More information

KA5029 -

International Academic Exchange 1 (Optional, 60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one semester as part of your programme.

This is a 60 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a semester of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad semester will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, if you pass, it is recognised in your transcript as an additional 60 credits for Engineering and Environment Study Abroad Semester.

More information

KA5030 -

International Academic Exchange 2 (Optional, 120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment and provides you with the option to study abroad for one full year as part of your programme.

This is a 120 credit module which is available between Levels 5 and 6. You will undertake a year of study abroad at an approved partner University where you will have access to modules from your discipline, but taught in a different learning culture. This gives you the opportunity to broaden your overall experience of learning. The structure of study will be dependent on the partner and will be recorded for an individual student on the learning agreement signed by the host University, the student, and the home University (Northumbria).

Your study abroad year will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. It will not count towards your final degree classification but, it is recognised in your transcript as a 120 credit Study Abroad module and on your degree certificate in the format – “Degree title (with Study Abroad Year)”.

More information

KF5000 -

Engineering and Environment Work Placement Year (Optional, 120 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one year work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, as well as accreditation bodies such as BCS, IET, IMechE, RICS, CIOB and CIBSE within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the Placement Year is recognised both in your transcript as a 120 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 40 weeks.

More information

KF5001 -

Engineering and Environment Work Placement Semester (Optional, 60 Credits)

This module is designed for all standard full-time undergraduate programmes within the Faculty of Engineering and Environment to provide you with the option to take a one semester work placement as part of your programme.

You will be able to use the placement experience to develop and enhance appropriate areas of your knowledge and understanding, your intellectual and professional skills, and your personal value attributes, relevant to your programme of study, within the appropriate working environments. Due to its overall positive impact on employability, degree classification and graduate starting salaries, the University strongly encourages you to pursue a work placement as part of your degree programme.

This module is a Pass/Fail module so does not contribute to the classification of your degree. When taken and passed, however, the placement is recognised both in your transcript as a 60 credit Work Placement Module and on your degree certificate.

Your placement period will normally be full-time and must total a minimum of 20 weeks.

More information

KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

KC6004 -

Data Security and Governance (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module is set in the context of today’s society and the organisations within. Social behaviour, often in the virtual environment, creates a range of ethical issues centering on information security and governance. In addition to exploring these social and ethical issues, legal and regulatory frameworks that have been developed in recent years to try to address these issues are examined. You will also learn about cybersecurity in organisations and will be introduced to a range of common threats and countermeasures. Topics include basic definitions of terminology alongside practical and theoretical frameworks to help you identify key governance and security issues, and explore potential preventative measures. You will be covering terms such as ‘governance’ and ‘cybersecurity’, frameworks which include the information life cycle, regulations and guidelines relating to professional conduct, privacy and data protection, surveillance, freedom of expression, and freedom of information and intellectual property. Cybersecurity topics will include user authentication, cloud storage, organisational security cultures, access control and encryption, social engineering, user privacy, organisational cyber-attack risk evaluation and breach reporting. Key topics are:

Organisational information and knowledge assets and Information Life Cycle
Corporate and information governance and professional conduct
Privacy, freedom of expression and surveillance
Data protection and freedom of information
Impact of globalisation on governance and security
Intellectual property
Cybersecurity and organisational security culture
Social Engineering
Attack and defence including user authentication, access control and encryption
Privacy and security in the cloud
Future of privacy and security
Cybersecurity risk evaluation and breach reporting

More information

KC6005 -

Smart Technologies and Agile UX design (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module aims to get students to think about the bigger picture when developing application tests for Smart and Wearable computing devices. These could be changeable depending on the user environment which impact on technological configuration and device interaction. This module informs practice by investigating models of User Behaviour and HCI to design and test core functionality within a range of contexts. These approaches help to galvanise the module aim which will improve planning and strategy when developing test designs and implementing recommendations.

This module is concerned primarily with understanding the user and their experience with interactive products; thus it will involve practical sessions along with theoretical debate surrounding user experience and how we design systems that meet their needs. In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• Cultural shift to mobile and smart devices
• Application of techniques for analysing user behaviour in specific contexts
• Review of methodologies
• Approaches to prototyping interactive design
• Running a mobile usability study testing experimental designs
• Analysis of user experience
• Evaluation and implementation of designs

More information

KC6006 -

Web Analytics (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module aims to further develop your ability to examine the concept of big data and how they have changed the analytics landscape. It will also enable you to appraise big data use across a wide range of applications and use analytical tools e.g., sentiment analysis, eye-tracking Google analytics to analyse social media usage. You will critically evaluate online analytics and their use as a tool for investigating social media. The module will enable you to plan and implement a complex analytics process in order to use appropriate online analytics to evaluate the impact of these on organisations’ decision making processes and customer relationship management.

You will learn how organisations can use data analysis, sentiment analysis, eye-tracking and webometrics techniques to exploit social media to enhance decision making and customer relationship management (CRM). In particular you will learn topics such as:
• Big data – what are they?
• Advanced webometrics and analytics, principles and practice, tools and techniques including identifying a range of appropriate statistical tools and applying them to data
• Critical evaluation of advanced tools and techniques e.g. cost and benefits
• Comparative case studies
• Sentiment analysis
• Eye tracking in social media analysis

More information

KF6010 -

Distributed Real-Time Systems (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module is designed to provide you with an in-depth understanding of the critical issues in the engineering of distributed real-time systems. It treats the theory and practical techniques required to implement such systems on both uni-processor and distributed systems. You will cover aspects of concurrent programming, the embedded programming design pattern, safe programming language subsets, reliability, fault tolerance, scheduling and resource management, distributed real-time design and implementation concepts, and the testing of distributed real-time systems.

The syllabus of the module will cover topics such as:
• Advanced Implementation Techniques: review of concurrent programming concepts; embedded programming design patterns; safe programming language subsets; design and implementation issues relating to performance analysis
• Distributed real-time systems: definition, overview of issues; predictable communications architectures, e.g. CAN, TTP; design and implementation concepts, system decomposition, partitioning and configuration; use of appropriate development tools
• Performance Analysis: predictable hardware and software; WCET analysis; real-time scheduling requirements; real-time scheduling algorithms; response time analysis for both uni-processor and distributed systems
• Reliability: issues relating to good engineering practice; notions of reliability, failure and faults; fault confinement; fault tolerance; N-version programming; recovery block approach; backward error recovery, forward error recovery; exception handling; testing, test case design, use of support tools

More information

KF6012 -

Web Application Integration (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn how to write robust, secure server-side applications using reusable components written in Object Oriented PHP to access, process and output structured data from databases, and services returning data as xml and json. You will then learn how to author client-side Single Page Applications (SPA) using the MV* pattern which will use the structured data returned from your server-side application. The SPA will use an appropriate development framework, like Google AngularJS framework

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KF6015 -

Games Design (Core, 20 Credits)

In this module you will learn about the design of computer games, the needs of and the issues facing the games industry and their impact upon games design. You will analyse a games problem and create a designs for their solution using industry standard methods. In particular you will learn about:
• Principles of good game design
• The elements of game design
• How games are made in the industry and the makeup of the industry
• Professional, legal, social and ethical issues faced by the industry in general, and how they affect the game designer.

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KF6017 -

Software Architecture for Games (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the structure of games software. Games engines are complex pieces of software that are worked on by a number of people, with different talents. To manage this complexity, programmers use a number of design patterns to decouple the code and make it more flexible and reusable. You will see how object-oriented principles such as generalisation and encapsulation can be used to achieve this.

Game engines are split into separate components, such as the gameplay component, graphics component, AI component, network component, etc. You will study common approaches used to design and implement a number of these components.

You will also learn to understand and communicate complex designs using diagrams and explanations. You will develop your programming skills to implement more complex object-oriented structures.

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KF6018 -

Computer Graphics and Animation (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will provide you with knowledge and understanding of the theoretical background to and the practical implementation of computer graphics and computer animation, which are two major components in the movie and game industries. They are also used in other industries for design and advertisement, such as furniture and car companies. On this module you will have the opportunity to experience hardware equipment used in the industries, such as a 3D motion capture system, 3D scanners and 3D printers, to help you better understand state-of-the-art computer graphics and animation pipelines.

You will learn about 3D modelling and rendering, perception principles, visualisation techniques, animation algorithms and simulations and how to implement software algorithms for 3D modelling, rendering, visualization and simulations - which you will use to develop your own software artefact. This module will cover the following topics:

1. Basic 3D geometry concepts, such as coordinates, transformations, view projections, etc.
2. 3D rendering components, such as modelling, illumination, shadowing, texture mapping, antialiasing and rasterization, etc.
3. Basic perception principles, such as gestalt principles, change blindness, colour theory, etc.
4. Visualization techniques, such as multivariate visualization methods, trees, networks, flow and volume visualization, etc.
5. Character animation algorithms, such as motion capture, keyframe animation, forward/inverse kinematics, dynamics controller, etc.
6. Crowd simulation algorithms, such as flocking, data-driven simulation, etc.
7. Physical simulations algorithms, such as fluid animation, hair simulation, cloth simulation, deformable objects, etc.

The module will, where appropriate, make use of well-known research papers and journals in computer graphics and animation, to help you develop your critical thinking skills, as well as your research and development skills.

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KF6052 -

Machine Learning and Computer Vision (Optional, 20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with knowledge and understanding of machine learning techniques and computer vision systems, including how to solve problems in these areas. In particular, you will cover topics such as:

• Machine learning
• Supervised machine learning techniques and classifiers
• Unsupervised machine learning techniques
• Computer vision and digital image fundamentals
• Legal, ethical and social issues in computer vision, and techniques for security.
• Application of machine learning techniques in computer vision (biometric systems, face, iris, fingerprint, etc.)

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KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

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KV6002 -

Team Project and Professionalism (Core, 20 Credits)

This module functions as a “cap-stone” to your Batchelor studies. The module gives you the opportunity to work in a team to build a significant computing product directly related to your programme of study. This develops and demonstrates your skills in leadership, team work, project management, planning, communication (both written and oral) as well as technical skills in the technology you choose to implement in. This module aims to give you further experience of team working in the specialism you have selected which is an invaluable asset and highly prized by employers. The project and its potential future commercial exploitation provide a context for you to critically evaluate your and your team’s performance, the fitness for purpose of the product you have developed and the legal, ethical, professional and social content of your chosen specialism. Appropriate Information Security factors will be considered as part of this evaluation. As part of this learning journey you will also explore the associated commercial and economic factors.

You will have the opportunity to apply a wide range of development skills (in specification, design and implementation) to your product development. All products will consider all aspects of the development life cycle. Some projects may be driven by research activity in the department’s research groups, some by the expectations of a “client” and some by students’ own interests. A “client” is a non-fictitious potential benefactor of the project for example a student’s employer, former placement provider, local charity etc. who are willing to formally consent to be involved in the project.

Wider Legal, Ethical, Social and Professional implications will be examined to enable you to appreciate the responsibilities involved in the development and use of computer products both in work and throughout society.

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KV6003 -

Individual Computing Project (Core, 40 Credits)

This module is an individual project where you have the opportunity to choose or define your own topic which will lead to you producing a significant piece of work related to the aims of your programme. To do this you will need to use and further develop skills that you have learned elsewhere in your course. You will become knowledgeable in your chosen topic including important concepts and literature and you will acquire new skills or learning (or extend existing skills or learning) that are needed to carry out the project. These could be technical skills such as a new programming language, or other knowledge and skills such as experimental methods used in your chosen area or the use of statistical techniques to analyse your results. You will also acquire or further develop skills in areas such as report writing, literature searching, research methods, data analysis, project management and personal time management.

You have the opportunity to choose between three structures for your project, including
• Software Engineering - suitable for projects whose emphasis is the construction of a piece of software (a product) for actual use or to a similar standard, following sound and thorough software engineering processes; you will be required to justify the product requirements and the tools and techniques used in support of the development.
• General - suitable for projects where an element of investigation is an important feature, and will include a significant literature review. The product may be a prototype aimed at supporting the investigation. It is also suitable for research-based projects or others whose main product is a computing deliverable other than software, e.g. a well-engineered design whose specification involves a significant element of supporting investigation of relevant literature, or a piece of computing hardware
• Investigative - for projects that carry out a significant piece of research or investigation. These projects must make use of practical computing skills related to your programme, but do not produce a substantial product.

Your project must include you undertaking practical work of some sort using computing/IT technology. This is most frequently achieved by the creation of an artefact as the focus for covering all or part of an implementation life-cycle. Projects based solely on literature review activity and/or user/market surveys are not acceptable.

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ML6001 -

Unilang - Languages for All - Level 6 Placeholder (Optional, 20 Credits)

The 20-credit yearlong Unilang modules (stages 1 – 5 depending on language) aim to encourage a positive attitude to language learning and to develop and practise the four language skills of speaking, listening, reading and writing introducing the basic/increasingly complex grammatical structures and vocabulary of the spoken and written language (depending on stage) and developing your ability to respond appropriately in spoken and written form in simple and increasingly complex everyday situations.

These modules also introduce you to the country and the culture of the country. In doing this, Unilang modules are intended to encourage and support international mobility; to enhance employability at home and abroad; to improve communication skills in the foreign language and in English as well as cultural awareness.

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TE6667 -

Student Tutoring Level 6 (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn how to be a tutor of students in schools or colleges. You will develop your skills in communicating effectively with children or young people. You will also develop your ability to self-manage, communicate, work in teams, and personal enterprise. As part of this process you will learn how to evaluate your own learning of how to support these pupils’ learning over a series of lessons. You will be learning how to transmit your own enthusiasm for learning in a professional context to pupils within the schooling system. You will learn about the issues facing teachers and other professionals within the school or college. Learning how to apply your existing skills and knowledge in a work related context will be an important focus of this module for you. Knowing how to determine which skills and knowledge are relevant, and make appropriate use of these in the work context, will be a major learning opportunity for you. At this level 6 you will learn how to critically evaluate your own learning.

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KC7020 -

Information Organisation and Access (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn about the key principles of information organisation and retrieval, and put them into practice and demonstrate advanced information and data management skills in diverse environments. You will be able to critically reflect on the theory and practice as well as contemporary research into the issues and contexts of information organisation and interactive information retrieval. You will also develop creative, critical and reflective problem solving capabilities and a commitment to lifelong learning in the management of information and data in different contexts.
Topics include:
1) Information organisation and access
a) Context, concepts, approaches, tools, techniques and standards
b) Structured and unstructured information, web information
c) Research data

2) Interactive information retrieval
a) Indexing techniques
b) Information retrieval models
c) Information interactions in specific domains and contexts

3) Human information behaviour
a) Human information behaviour models
b) User interfaces
c) Usability an devaluation of information retrieval

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KC7021 -

Statistics and Business Intelligence (Optional, 20 Credits)

The aim of the module is to provide you with the knowledge and practical skills for applying modern analytical techniques to business data. The module combines both theoretical and practical approaches so that you will have the skills to tackle problems in various realistic business settings.

This module is primarily concerned with examining and analysing (big) data arising from business(es) and to relate the extracted information to strategic, tactical and operational decision-making in organisations. You will covers topics such as:

• Data processing and big data
• Exploratory data analysis
• Probability and distributions
• Hypothesis testing
• Correlation and regression analysis
• Classification
• Distance measures
• Clustering

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KC7022 -

Information Systems and Technologies (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn the necessary knowledge and skills to analyse, synthesise and evaluate information systems; and to appraise and use a range of appropriate information technologies for solving problems within a business / enterprise context. You will learn about modern data-storage paradigm and how contemporary business is making use of cloud computing technologies and services. The module will be taught from two complementary perspectives: the managerial perspective and from the perspective of a developer. From these perspectives you will learn how an appropriate incorporation of technology and innovation into corporate strategy and management can lead organisations to achieve profitable and sustainable competitive advantage. Throughout the module, key issues around security and ethics when implementing and using such technologies will be introduced and discussed.

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KC7024 -

User Behaviour and Interaction Design (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will gain an insight into a range of theories, models, metaphors and frameworks regarding user behaviour in information environments.. You will learn how these can be harnessed to enhance the design process enabling interface designers to move towards user-centred design approaches. You will develop skills in the practice of analysing, monitoring and evaluating user behaviour.

You will be examining in depth theories and models of cognitive, social and emotional interaction in the technological environment and you will be exposed to current research in this area. Quantitative and qualitative methods including sentiment analysis will also be covered.

Tools such as eye-tracking devices, which can be used in the endeavour, will be demonstrated and you will be given an opportunity to evaluate their effectiveness.. Methodologies such as participatory design will also be analysed.

Related ethical and legal issues will be addressed on such issues as accessibility and assistive technologies, security and data protection, privacy issues and information governance.

In summary, the topics you will be learning about are as follows:
• Information behaviour from theory of least effort to co-creation of content
• The user experience and how to capture it
• Cognitive, social and emotional interaction in the technological environment
• Interaction design principles
• Persuasive technologies and behavioural design
• Participatory design methodologies and why they are useful
• Reflecting on wider use, inclusion and equality of access
• Ethical and legal aspects

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KF7002 -

Ethical Hacking for Cyber Security (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will enable you to develop a deep understanding of both theoretical and practical aspects of Ethical Hacking. An essential part of a modern organisation’s e-security. The module includes testing and analysis to determine vulnerabilities. Carrying out such work requires a special skill set, which crosses, legal issues, psychology, computer networks along with detailed understanding of system vulnerabilities and exploits. Additionally, you will be exposed to a collection of industry standard hacking tools and will learn how to apply these in an ethical manner to determine system vulnerabilities.

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KF7003 -

Network Security (Optional, 20 Credits)

The main objective of this module is to provide you with an in-depth coverage of the fundamental concepts, principles and technologies for network security. This module will provide you with a theoretical and practical understanding on two important aspects related to security namely, data security and network security. The module will cover a number of topics including cryptography, classical systems, IP protocol security, private and public-key cryptography, cryptographic protocols, hash functions, authentication, signature schemes, email and web security, viruses, and firewalls. The concepts introduced in lectures are reinforced with the help of extensive hands on laboratory workshops. You will also have the opportunity to develop practical networking skills by using Cisco IOS, configuration of firewalls, switches and routers. You will also explore the wider impact of security via a consideration of related legal, ethical and social issues.

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KF7004 -

MComp Computing Research Project (Core, 40 Credits)

This module will give you the opportunity to engage with a topic at the forefront of the computing discipline. You will experience the full life cycle of a research project. This will involve identifying a research question from computing literature, writing a research proposal, designing and carrying out a piece of research in accordance with ethical guidelines and good practice, analysing the results, forming conclusions, and writing a research paper. In the process, you will gain an in-depth understanding of the chosen topic area and extend your knowledge of research methodologies.

All the projects are practical computing research projects and will involve the development and evaluation of a testable computing product of some kind.

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KF7008 -

Mobile Application Development (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn the principal issues in the development of software applications for mobile, location aware, networked devices, such as phones and tablets. These include the interaction between the user experience, power consumption, network connectivity, device size and hardware capabilities.

In the first half of the module you will look at theoretical issues, and in particular at those aspects of mobile applications that are significantly different from desktop applications. These include the different user experience caused by interacting by touch, instead of using a keyboard, and the effect of using devices of differing sizes, and hardware characteristics that differ markedly from desktop computers. You will also learn how to use the multimedia and sensor capabilities that are embedded in mobiles. These enable multimedia (sound, video) playback and recording, and sensors that allow location awareness.

You will learn about the mobile application development process and practical issues in the second half of the module, including a typical mobile application environment. This is done through a series of practical exercises, each of which results in a working mobile application. You will also cover the security and permissions framework that applies to mobile applications and their capabilities.

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KF7009 -

Decision Support Systems (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module provides you with the opportunity to learn about state-of-the-art technologies and research work in decision support methods, tools and techniques. You will learn about the fundamentals of tackling decisions of increasing difficulty and about computerized methods for knowledge extraction, knowledge fusion and management to support decision making. These will include machine learning, artificial intelligence, data warehousing and data mining approaches with examples of various application areas, including economic and industrial engineering ones. You will implement computerised decision support systems for specific real-life problems.

In particular, the module syllabus will cover the following topics:

• Decision-Making Systems and Models
• Data Warehousing, Data Mining
• Modelling and Analysis, Data Visualization
• Agent based modelling and simulation
• Game theory
• Multiple objective optimizations
• Genetic Algorithms
• Subgroup discovery
• The professional, ethical, legal, social issues, including security/data protection and implications of the development and use of decision support systems

Due to the research-based nature of the module, you will employ key research skills (e.g. using literature, using citation, critical analysis, evaluation etc.) throughout the module.

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KF7012 -

Implementation of Object Oriented Designs (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will enhance your Software Engineering skills using an object oriented methods to develop applications. The module has a strong focus on current professional best practice. You will learn about programming design patterns which can be applied to the Presentation, Domain and Data Access layers of an application and technologies such as Object Relational Mapping that allow the domain layer to remain object orientated while storage uses a relational model. In the module you will also learn about Microsoft C# and .Net development, the design and implementation of client-server applications, the use of the Encryption framework within .Net and testing strategies.

The module will cover the following topics:

1. Familiarisation with .Net development and the C# Language
2. Abstract Data type, Immutable objects and Encapsulation
3. Presentation Design Patterns (e.g., Supervising Controller and Passive View)
4. Design Principles (e.g., Open-Closed, Dependency Inversion, Single Responsibility etc.)
5. Creational Design Patterns and their Implementation
6. Behavioural Design Patterns and their Implementation
7. Structural Design Patterns and their Implementation
8. Data Access (ADO level 1 and LEVEL 2)
9. Object Relational Mapping
10. Testing using unit testing frameworks and Mock objects
11. Threading
12. Client-server applications
13. Encryption

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KF7027 -

Information Assurance and Risk Management (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will provide you with an in-depth knowledge of the processes used in assuring the security of information during use, sharing, storage, transmission and disposal. It will cover the protection of the integrity, authenticity, availability and confidentiality of all classes of information. The module is designed to provide a comprehensive framework for ensuring the resilience of business activities during threats and disruptive events thus enabling the assessment of potential risks to the business which could result from disasters or emergency situations. A breakdown of the key areas of information risk assessment – context establishment, information risk assessment will be followed by the various elements of risk analysis and evaluation. An examination of the treatment of identified risks will be used to illustrate that mitigation is not the only option that organisations The last element of the module will explore the important aspect of communicating the result of the risk management process with key stakeholders.
You will develop an in-depth understanding of the different types of business interruptions - man-made, natural disasters and technology failures - and the potential damage / revenue losses that can result from them. It is crucial to perform regular disaster recovery testing exercises in order to prove that organisations can recover from catastrophic loss of data and facilities.

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KF7030 -

Web system engineering (Optional, 20 Credits)

You will learn how to build, and how to resolve practical issues in doing so, a scalable, cloud hosted, commercial class web service application. That is, a web application that can securely scale to potentially support millions users. Furthermore, you will learn how to apply and interpret statistical web analytics that will give you feedback on where your web application succeeds and where it may be improved.

As web applications are often instrumental in securing commercial success, you will learn how to protect the investment your organisation is making. To do this you will develop an understanding of disaster recovery strategies and their commercial implications. This will combined with development of an in depth awareness of both internal and external security threats, and knowledge of best practice in how they may be countered.

Finally, you will learn best practice in web application development. This will be through the use of industry leading server and client side technologies, and best practice in software development, such as the use of distributed version control software development that emphasises data integrity, and support for non-linear workflows.

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KF7031 -

Wireless Networks and Security (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module is designed to be suitable for a variety of networking professional roles including those wishing to gain a deeper understanding of 802.11 protocols, security and enterprise deployment. Additionally, it is suitable for wireless network administrators and support or design staff requiring a greater understanding of the new technologies and applications of modern converged networks and delegates seeking Certified Wireless Network Associate (or similar) certification. You will study the following areas:

Enterprise wireless deployment elements and methodologies
Basic RF characteristics for mobile systems
802.11 protocol operation and technologies
Wireless security issues and attack vulnerabilities

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KF7032 -

Big Data and Cloud Computing (Optional, 20 Credits)

In this module you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to tackle a realistic big data problem, using some of the principal machine learning techniques and statistical approaches used in big data analysis. Furthermore, you will learn how to implement your solution using an industry leading Cloud computing provider together with appropriate distributed processing environments.

You will learn how to host multi-terabyte sized big datasets using a cloud service provider. This will includes provisioning a commercial cloud provider, and then mastering appropriate distributed operating systems, such as Hadoop. You will then learn approaches to processing and analysing big data, based on advanced statistical processing, supervised and unsupervised machine learning algorithms and other state of the art big data analytic methods. Such techniques include clustering algorithms, pattern based information extraction, linear and non-linear regression, and feature based models. Inevitably, much work on big data analysis is statistical, so you will therefore develop some relevant statistical understanding. As data visualization is frequently critical in helping to develop hypotheses about the data, you will also cover and apply problem relevant 2D and 3D visualization methods where appropriate to the particular datasets.

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KF7033 -

Augmented reality (Optional, 20 Credits)

This module will you will learn about augmented reality, which is one of the most important components in the area of next generation human computer interaction. You will learn about the theoretical background of and gain development skills in augmented reality. This will include extending your knowledge of computer graphics, animation and vision, and combining these areas with knowledge of human computer interaction to create augmented reality applications. You will gain experience of hardware systems for immersive human-computer interaction, such as different motion sensors and depth cameras, and will utilise them in software applications.

Augmented reality aims at providing the user an immersive experience while interacting with the computer. For example, a real-world scenario/scene can be augmented to insert artificial virtual characters and objects that follow the geometry of the real world. This involves using computer vision techniques to understand a scenario captured by colour or depth video, as well as using computer graphics and animation techniques to render virtual objects in a realistic manner. To enhance the immersiveness of the application, virtual reality hardware such as 3D motion capture systems and gesture-based control systems are usually used as the input devices to capture the scenario/scene. Typical application areas of augmented reality include console gaming, sport training, architecture, education, medical visualization, etc.

Specifically, this module will cover the following topics:
1. The concepts in augmented reality
2. Natural user interfaces for motion and gesture based input, such as Microsoft Kinect and Leap Motion controller
3. Immersive display and feedback systems, such as 3D displays and head mounted displays
4. Vision based image understanding and object tracking
5. 3D reconstruction of a scenario
6. Photo realistic rendering techniques
7. Improving presence using immersive audio, smell and tactile feedback
8. Software development pipeline for augmented reality

The module will, where appropriate, make use of well-known research papers and journals in augmented reality, to help you develop your critical thinking skills, as well as your research and development skills.

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KF7034 -

3D Graphics Programming (Core, 20 Credits)

You will learn how to program 3D graphics games software on an industry-standard games platform (games console or PC). This will include learning how to create elements of a games engine (the rendering of model meshes, and texturing and transforming them, elements of lighting and other graphical effects) which you will then use to create a small game. You will also learn the supporting mathematics of 3D representation and simulation.

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KF7046 -

Computer Network Implementation (Optional, 20 Credits)

The aim of this module is to promote graduate-level study of topics in computer network implementation. You will shown how to develop a systematic understanding of modern principles, software, techniques and tools for the investigation, analysis and evaluation of computer network implementations. You will also be introduced to topics at the forefront of computer networking research.

One of the features of the module is that you are encouraged to work directly with primary sources, including ISO standards, RFC's and original research papers, many of which are classics in the field of computer network implementation.
Lectures are used to provide context and motivation for the material and you are expected to supplement your understanding by reading the technical and research literature. You will develop practical and experimental techniques in computer network implementation in the lab sessions. There will be weekly exercises and you will be able to discuss your solutions with each other and with staff.

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KV5001 -

Academic Language Skills for Computer and Information Sciences (Optional, 0 Credits)

Academic skills when studying away from your home country can differ due to cultural and language differences in teaching and assessment practices. This module is designed to support your transition in the use and practice of technical language and subject specific skills around assessments and teaching provision in your chosen subject. The overall aim of this module is to develop your abilities to read and study effectively for academic purposes; to develop your skills in analysing and using source material in seminars and academic writing and to develop your use and application of language and communications skills to a higher level.

The topics you will cover on the module include:

• Understanding assignment briefs and exam questions.
• Developing academic writing skills, including citation, paraphrasing, and summarising.
• Practising ‘critical reading’ and ‘critical writing’
• Planning and structuring academic assignments (e.g. essays, reports and presentations).
• Avoiding academic misconduct and gaining credit by using academic sources and referencing effectively.
• Listening skills for lectures.
• Speaking in seminar presentations.
• Presenting your ideas
• Giving discipline-related academic presentations, experiencing peer observation, and receiving formative feedback.
• Speed reading techniques.
• Developing self-reflection skills.

More information

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