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Digital Economy, Strategy and Telecommunications

Telecommunications is at the heart of today’s economy and society. Through widely available telecommunication networks, we are able to surf the Internet, buy goods and services online and talk to one another. But not everyone has access to these networks.

In some parts of the world, there are no telecommunication networks. For a variety of economic, political and technical reasons, some areas are not served by telecommunication companies. And even when telecommunication networks are available, some may not be able to use them because they can not afford the services or lack the necessary skills to make the most of them.

Due to the central role played by telecommunications today, there is a clear need to understand this industry. This understanding reflects the complex and dynamic interaction that occurs between and range of fixed and wireless technologies, the companies operating in the market and the basis on which they compete. Integral to this is identifying how demand for services develops, and how users – individuals and companies – can maximise the benefits to be enjoyed from using the Internet, communicating with family and friends etc.

These issues have been explored by Professors Jason Whalley and James Cunningham and their research team. Working with organisations they have sought to identify and understand the challenges and opportunities associated with the digital economy. This has resulted in a significant body of work emerging including a new book – Mobile Telecommunications Networks: Restructuring in response to the new global economy (Edward Elgar, 2014) – by Peter Curwen and Jason Whalley. This book explores how technical changes is affecting the telecommunications industry

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To find out more, get in touch with the leads for this research theme Professor Jason Whalley and Professor James Cunningham.

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